should i even think about it ?

Discussion in 'General International Discussion' started by future_doc_?, May 6, 2004.

  1. future_doc_?

    future_doc_? Junior Member

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    hello to all ,

    slite question for thee who wants medical school to be his life :

    does having diabetes effect anything ?!?!?!?!?!? :eek:

    i have to set my path as soon as possible , i've had diatbetes for 13 years now ( 18 y/o ) and i really want medical school, but does my being diabetic have a negetive inpact on the medical schools ? if yes how :scared: ? if not why :confused: ? for this i'm talking about medical schools in all of IRELAND , THE UNITED KINGDOM and THE STATES ?


    thanx all,
     
  2. Mr Reddly

    Mr Reddly Snowglobe!
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    I'm in the states so I can't speak for outside, but why do you think it would impact you? I would think it could be helpful for some aspects of medicine. Also, as a curiosity, do you inject or are you a pumper (insulin pump)?
     
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  3. future_doc_?

    future_doc_? Junior Member

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    well,

    having diabetes is a true reason for my wanting medical school, i've been on injections all my life ... i should try the pumper , for now injecting insulin is the way for me...

    I once read that those who are diabetic are not permitted to try to do surgery , and surgery is an entire year in some medical schools,even more.
    plus, my doctor says that stress SHALL kill me some day :) i know that but what ever ,,,i love medicine !
     
  4. BellKicker

    BellKicker Twisted Miler
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    Future doc,

    I have never heard of anyone having a whole year of surgery in med school. We had about 4 months - all subspecialties included - and that's probably more than in the US. Also, it's not like they all leave the room and tell you to "stitch up that mitral valve, will you".

    Now, one part that might be a problem you haven't thought of I've seen up close with two of my close friends in med school. One has hypothyroidism and for years it's been kind of a weird topic, like she'd leave lectures and generally seem VERY vulnerable about it. Another friend has very high cholesterol; I can tell it bugs him that we all know he has that extra risk factor.

    (Which totally reminds me of the time I twisted me left testicle during a lecture and had to strip down and have the lecturer untwist me.)

    I'm just saying all med students are hypochondriacs. You'll hear a lot about complications of diabetes in almost every specialty you rotate through. It won't change anything for you but it might get under your skin after a while.

    OTOH, a lot of people will think you're mr. Cool if you share with them what it's like to be a diabetic.
     
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  5. IlianaSedai

    IlianaSedai Senior Member
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    I know some medical students who are diabetic. They are just the same as everyone else, and are treated no differently. While I can't speak for them, I do not think it will negatively affect your experience in medical school to any greater degree than it impacts your life in general.
     
  6. leorl

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    WHAT! sheesh.... That must have been embarrassing....

    FutureDoc, there's no reason why being diabetic should impact your aspirations and ambitions. As long as you manage it properly for your own health and functioning, there's no problem.... Interest in diabetes in all three of those countries is quite high, because the Ireland, the UK and America are the top three countries experiencing the problem of the spiralling obesity and diabetes epidemic. I should say your reason for being interested in medicine might even enhance your application because this is an area where significant research and money is being spent.
     
  7. JohnnyOU

    JohnnyOU Slow like Honey
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    OMG

    That sounds sooooooooooooooooooooooooo painful :(

    J~
     
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  8. jakstat33

    jakstat33 Senior Member
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    FD- one of my classmates has diabetes, and if anything it has helped her deal with the mess known as MICRO/IMMUNO, a 2nd year class... seriously though, living with diabetes should not affect your decision one way or another. you should not be overly aggressive in pursuing a career fraught with emotional insecurity just because you have a lifelong disease, which can be a killer if left uncontrolled. i guess what i'm saying is figure yourself out first, decide what it is you really want out of life, and make the necessary adjustments to help you achieve this.
     
  9. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    While having diabetes means that you need to be more organized than your peers (especially in rotations with unpredicatable hours), there should be no reason why it should affect your ability to pursue medicine and any of its specialties.

    I know at least 2 surgery residents with insulin dependent diabetes - they have to be more careful about their diet, monitoring sugar levels etc, than the rest of it, but somehow they have managed. I believe they both found Vascular Surgery rotations a bit trying (as many of the amputations are done on diabetics), but otherwise thrived.
     
  10. Dr.Wolkower

    Dr.Wolkower the same to you
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    as long as you want to be an md and have the energty to do it diabetes should not prevent you good luck
     
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  11. rah223

    rah223 Member
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    Hey,

    I'm a type 1 diabetic, and I just finished up my 1st year of medical school in May. As with you, It was a big reason why I chose medicine. Don't let that stop you at all, and give the insulin pump a try. It gives you so much flexibility that weird schedules won't be a problem. I don't know where you heard the no surgery thing as that has never been mentioned to me. The only thing that diabetics can't do is fly a commercial plane. :)
     

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