Mar 18, 2010
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I'm a sophomore in high school, and I really want to go into the medical field. I've looked at different opportunities in the medical field, and several have interested me, including pharmacy, vet, and pre-med. I'm a very good student (top 5 in my class, 4.0 GPA), but the thought of trying to get into med school scares me. From what I've heard, the MCAT is a very hard test, and getting into med school is very hard as well.

I'm looking at undergrad schools that would prepare me well for acceptance into med school, and I've found some that look very good. My question to you is, if you have a strong work ethic, what are your chances of getting into med school? Also, are there any undergrad schools that have connections with med schools? (guaranteed acceptance and that sort of thing)
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Hello,
I recommend going to the HSDN section. Its dedicated to helping high schoolers interested in a medical school admission as well as other health fields. With a 4.0 if you can keep it up and score very well on the sat (2000+) you can apply to combined BA/MD or BA/DO programs. These programs are either 6 or 7 years long and sometimes wave the need to take the mcat.
However I wouldn't necessarily recommend those programs. But yes regardless I think that its a little bit early to be thinking about medicine ;). But really getting into medical school isn't that scary, I'll say its not easy but if your diligent and dedicated you'll be fine.

If your interested in pharmacy you can get into 2 and 4 year program ( 2 years undergrad and then 4 years of pharm school). Vet school is also pretty much similar in requirements as medicine conventionally 4 years of college + 4 years of vet school.
 
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Ischemic

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NO you shouldn't bother applying to medical school. We need more people to go into the arts like painters, writers and other vocations that end up with you living in a run down apt surrounded with your failed "artwork".
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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You are free to do what you want with your life. My advice, as a person who already went to college and works in the real world, get a degree that is employable. I do not care if it is accounting, biochemistry (pharma sales, lab work, and the like), business, finance, marketing, any engineering field, graphic design, and some other degrees.....you can still take your pre-med courses and go to medical school. If you feel the need, you can double major at your own risk.
I recommend Econ :).
 

bravofleet4

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keep in mind there's no such thing as a pre-med major. you can major whatever you want as long as you take the pre-requisites which for the most part is 1 year general chemistry, 1 year organic chemistry, 2 semesters or quarters of math, 1 year of physics, and 1-2 bio labs.
 

metallica81788

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It's a bit early, just concentrate on having fun and graduating high school. Get into a college that you like, and is cheap - because if you're even thinking about medicine you don't want to carry any undergrad debt with you. Then come back in 4 years and let us know how you're doing. :thumbup:
 

Janieve

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You know what? I'm gonna stop rephrasing this every time I post it. Let me give you the same lecture every other high school student here gets from me:

1. You are a child. I know, you're closing in on adulthood. But I'll tell you this now: there is not some instant maturity reached upon the transition between seventeen and eighteen. You're still a kid, and that's something awesome. Go do stupid things while you can. Hang out with friends. Take a road trip. Go bungee jumping. Eat on your parents' dime and date high schoolers. Don't think too hard about college until you're actually IN college.

2. NOTHING is set in stone. When I graduated high school, I traipsed on over to China and played my trumpet through four provinces. I was dead-set on entering the Peace Corps and really didn't even plan on college. When I entered college, I was going to major in applied linguistics and STILL join the Peace Corps. Obviously, that's not how things worked out.

I'd say that there's a minimum 70% chance you will change your focus from medicine to something else. You would be doing yourself a disservice by not contemplating other fields. Who's to say you wouldn't be happy as an astronaut or a stockbroker? Maybe your life will be complete with a position as a restaurant owner. Who knows, you may become a PA or a nurse or something. Sure, it's great to have distinct goals. But let yourself have time to make them!

3. Don't follow a set course to the letter. I planned to major in linguistics when I entered university. On my brother's advice, I took other classes - Japanese, anthropology, computer science, creative writing. I'm now currently working towards a double major in Japanese and Anthropology. Take classes in things you wouldn't have considered otherwise. Take psychology or horticulture. Maybe gender studies. Learn a language or take a class in political science. It might end up the best thing you ever did.

4. Take advantage of opportunities. Go wild. I never would've thought to be a doctor until I had to wait a year to give blood, and if I couldn't give blood, I figured I might as well give time. My volunteer experience with the Red Cross opened the door to health care for me, and subsequent exposure to the field is what made me decide to go into medicine. I also accepted an offer to study abroad (best experience of my life) and have attended conferences all around. Accepting invitations and taking advantage of opportunities presented to you will change your life, whether in small (using your own thermos instead of disposable cups at cafes) or big (pursuing a career you never even imagined) ways.
Hope that helps you out, kid! It's never to early to think about your future, but try not to make decisions until you're a part of the real world. Good luck with high school!
 
D

da8s0859q

I'm a sophomore in high school, and I really want to go into the medical field. I've looked at different opportunities in the medical field, and several have interested me, including pharmacy, vet, and pre-med. I'm a very good student (top 5 in my class, 4.0 GPA), but the thought of trying to get into med school scares me. From what I've heard, the MCAT is a very hard test, and getting into med school is very hard as well.

I'm looking at undergrad schools that would prepare me well for acceptance into med school, and I've found some that look very good. My question to you is, if you have a strong work ethic, what are your chances of getting into med school? Also, are there any undergrad schools that have connections with med schools? (guaranteed acceptance and that sort of thing)
Dude, you've got lots to go before you need to start really worrying about all this. One thing at a time. But in any case...

As aforementioned: "going into pre-med" isn't really that. You can major in chemistry, biology, psychology, music, ... anything you'd like, really. As long as you complete the usual course requirements for most schools (a year of general chemistry, organic chemistry, general biology, and some other stuff), you're fine.

Taking Step (think "board exam that kicks the MCAT down the stairs and takes its lunch money") concerns me. Matching into a residency in which I'll be happy concerns me. Lots of things down the road concern me. Point is, I think it'd be wise to not look so many steps ahead; yes, planning is a great thing, but there's a difference between that and simply getting bogged down in too much, too soon. You, my friend, have years to enjoy before you even start to worry about the MCAT.

Statistically, less than half of first-time applicants make it into any given US MD-granting medical school (as opposed to a DO school). The American Association of Medical Colleges, the organization which oversees the production of the MCAT and the AMCAS (the med school application used by most schools in the country, save for Texas state schools), produces statistics on this sort of thing. You may want to start here.

Some medical schools do have admissions programs like what you're talking about, but they are the minority and have their own requirements. I know of one or two here in Texas, but I suspect others here can tell you more about this sort of thing nationwide than I can.