Should I stay with my current job (research) or take a new one (clinical)

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trailrunner141

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Hello everyone.

First and foremost: thank you for taking the time to read my post and help me out. I am a 28 YO nontrad. I spent the past year scribing in an emergency department and I LOVED IT! My experience prompted me to start in a premedical post bacc program, in which I am in the second semester of my first year. I recently moved to the city where my post bacc is located and secured a research position in a dry lab where I help PIs with statistical research, specifically in the context of pharmaceuticals. It's very dry and takes up a lot of my time (it's a very busy department and I usually clock around 45-50 hours per week). It's a good job on paper, especially in the context of shaping a med school application; however, I'm not nearly as excited by the work as I was when working in a hospital.

A friend of mine in my post bacc program connected me with an opportunity to work as an ED tech in a lvl 1 trauma center. I feel that I would enjoy the work significantly more than what I am doing currently. I fear that by leaving my current job to pursue this that I could be setting myself up for failure in the med school application process for lack of research experience/publications. What are your thoughts on this?

For context (this might help inform your answer), I spent 4 years before I changed careers in the research department of an investment bank. There, I did a lot of work for which med schools view research favorably (analyzing data, preparing presentations, presenting your findings, etc.) However it had no connection to science (I analyzed consumer stocks and published research on buy/sell recommendations on behalf of the bank). I am not sure if this experience could cover the hole in my application that a lack of science research presents? I really have no insight.

thank you!
Trailrunner

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Are you just gunning for Harvard level medschools? Research and publications will help with getting into those top tier schools.

If not, then you do not need research to get accepted into non-Harvard level medschools. Make sure all your other ECs are fulfilled and your GPAs and MCAT are competitive for the schools you are applying to and you are good to go.
 
how did you handle the transition from investment banking to scribing? i was looking into scribing recently, but it seems to pay much less than what i'm doing right now.

and where is your postbacc?
 
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how did you handle the transition from investment banking to scribing? i was looking into scribing recently, but it seems to pay much less than what i'm doing right now.

and where is your postbacc?
The transition from investment banking was so fun - I love being in healthcare environments and it was a treat to work alongside a physician everyday. If you're asking from the vantage point of "how did you deal with the pay cut?" It's not as bad as you think. I still made enough money to keep a roof over my head and food on the table - which is good enough for me.

I'm in the PMP at Harvard Extension School.
 
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Are you just gunning for Harvard level medschools? Research and publications will help with getting into those top tier schools.

If not, then you do not need research to get accepted into non-Harvard level medschools. Make sure all your other ECs are fulfilled and your GPAs and MCAT are competitive for the schools you are applying to and you are good to go.
Thanks for the input. It's tricky because I don't want to count top schools out of the picture. On the other hand, I want to spend my time in a hospital and not at a desk rearranging numbers. Does anyone else have any insight into this dilemma?
 
Thanks for the input. It's tricky because I don't want to count top schools out of the picture. On the other hand, I want to spend my time in a hospital and not at a desk rearranging numbers. Does anyone else have any insight into this dilemma?
Hi Trailrunner, I am a nontrad pre-med student in a similar boat. Did you get any more input on this?

Or, if anyone else wants to weigh in on this still, I'd love to hear more - thanks!
 
I got a ton of input. the short answer was: if you want to go to a T20, stay research. otherwise, go ED. I actually went with staying with my current research position for two reasons, neither of which had to deal with wanting to apply T20: 1) The ED came back to me with my schedule and I would only be working Friday-Saturday-Sunday 12 hour overnight shifts. That didnt work for me. 2) I spoke with my current position about my desire to have a more flexible work schedule to volunteer in a clinical setting. They allowed me to make up some time when I see fit remotely as long as I get my work done, which frees me up to scratch my clinical itch through volunteering. If you have any other questions or want to talk generally about the premed process as a nontrad - I'd love to. Please feel free to DM me.
 
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