messenger634

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A year ago (2015) I left my residency after one year. I didn't want to practice medicine permanently and its turned out to be the right decision. I'm going to be back in school when making good money and all that. My residency wasn't thrilled when I decided to leave–in fact it put them on probation and the residency director left a few months later. They have faxed a form or two as I've needed in the last year, and I got a previously license without needing any of their help, but I applied for a new license (I do want to see patients part time, and I moved to a new state a few months ago), in early May and they still haven't filled out my forms. I've tried to be patient and understanding, but I think they're bitter and maybe have put me the off because they don't want to deal with me. I handled leaving and everything very professionally. Does 2 a half months seems like a long amount of time to wait for these forms to be filled out? What would you do?
 

Crayola227

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A year ago (2015) I left my residency after one year. I didn't want to practice medicine permanently and its turned out to be the right decision. I'm going to be back in school when making good money and all that. My residency wasn't thrilled when I decided to leave–in fact it put them on probation and the residency director left a few months later. They have faxed a form or two as I've needed in the last year, and I got a previously license without needing any of their help, but I applied for a new license (I do want to see patients part time, and I moved to a new state a few months ago), in early May and they still haven't filled out my forms. I've tried to be patient and understanding, but I think they're bitter and maybe have put me the off because they don't want to deal with me. I handled leaving and everything very professionally. Does 2 a half months seems like a long amount of time to wait for these forms to be filled out? What would you do?
Get an attorney.

Nothing like a letter with an attorney's letterhead on it to get people moving.
 
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messenger634

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Get an attorney.

Nothing like a letter with an attorney's letterhead on it to get people moving.
I appreciate the rec - Ive considered it. But what kind of attorney, and on what basis? Also - I see JD in your sig. Are you a lawyer?
 

Crayola227

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I appreciate the rec - Ive considered it. But what kind of attorney, and on what basis? Also - I see JD in your sig. Are you a lawyer?
Lol, no, that's an exchange between the two characters JD and Dr. Cox on the tv show Scrubs.

You could try getting an attorney that specializes either in medical board dealings (they likely have experience getting past employers/programs to cough up paperwork) or one that specializes in employment law (same deal).

You can google for these, or contact your local Bar Association (google) and see if they can refer to someone.
Remember, if one attorney can't help you, you can always ask if they know another who can.

Also, before someone says this is going to antagonize you and hurt the program, remember that getting legal advice from an attorney never has to be something anyone knows anything about.

Also, in general, if a hospital, program, or HR gets a letter from an attorney, that almost always triggers them to bring out their own attorneys because hospital legal risk management is a huge deal as you might imagine.

Do you think their attorney is going to advise them to continue their little passive aggressive bull**** game, or tell them to just cough up the forms??

Food for thought.
 
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messenger634

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Lol, no, that's an exchange between the two characters JD and Dr. Cox on the tv show Scrubs.

You could try getting an attorney that specializes either in medical board dealings (they likely have experience getting past employers/programs to cough up paperwork) or one that specializes in employment law (same deal).

You can google for these, or contact your local Bar Association (google) and see if they can refer to someone.
Remember, if one attorney can't help you, you can always ask if they know another who can.

Also, before someone says this is going to antagonize you and hurt the program, remember that getting legal advice from an attorney never has to be something anyone knows anything about.

Also, in general, if a hospital, program, or HR gets a letter from an attorney, that almost always triggers them to bring out their own attorneys because hospital legal risk management is a huge deal as you might imagine.

Do you think their attorney is going to advise them to continue their little passive aggressive bull**** game, or tell them to just cough up the forms??

Food for thought.
Thanks - yes, they are very legal conscious. And its def a passive aggressive game. This is the kind of garbage that caused me to leave. They are so childish. Thanks for the advice.
 
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Law2Doc

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Also, before someone says this is going to antagonize you and hurt the program, remember that getting legal advice from an attorney never has to be something anyone knows anything about...
Except that you just told him to have the lawyer send a letter on legal letterhead, not just get advice...

This may be where you end up but not a good starting point. Start with a phone call or two. The issue may be clerical. Then maybe a reminder letter/ email. Only then consider the big guns. Hiring a lawyer for every little thing is the SDN knee jerk response, but not actually the right way to get things done in a professional setting. You will have to deal with these people again in the future.
 
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messenger634

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Except that you just told him to have the lawyer send a letter on legal letterhead, not just get advice...

This may be where you end up but not a good starting point. Start with a phone call or two. The issue may be clerical. Then maybe a reminder letter/ email. Only then consider the big guns. Hiring a lawyer for every little thing is the SDN knee jerk response, but not actually the right way to get things done in a professional setting. You will have to deal with these people again in the future.
Agreed. I had called a lawyer just to discuss the possibilities but as a matter of fact I got an email today that it was taken care of- I wonder if they browse studentdr! I wrote back to thank them. Even if in another week or two I hadn't heard anything I wasn't going to sic a lawyer on them. Not worth it in the long run at this point as you said. I think it's only human nature to have a bit of bitterness towards me for leaving, thus making me sweat a bit on these forms. It was a lot they had to fill out, including a letter. In the future I may have a lawyer on tap in case I feel it's going down the tubes.
 
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Crayola227

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I was merely outlining steps for upping the ante -not to go full nuclear on the first shot

L2D is right, you want to give them time, contact them personally and politely by phone and email with gentle reminders

I just meant if push comes to shove you can never hurt yourself getting legal advice as long as you are aware that it's just that - advice!

I just meant you can have a lawyer in your back pocket and you can go nuclear PRN - just remember it's nuclear
 

exsanguination

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I was merely outlining steps for upping the ante -not to go full nuclear on the first shot

L2D is right, you want to give them time, contact them personally and politely by phone and email with gentle reminders

I just meant if push comes to shove you can never hurt yourself getting legal advice as long as you are aware that it's just that - advice!

I just meant you can have a lawyer in your back pocket and you can go nuclear PRN - just remember it's nuclear
How do you have so much time to post on SDN? The interesting part of it all is that your advice is always mediocre at best, including your behemoth intern thread
 
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messenger634

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How do you have so much time to post on SDN? The interesting part of it all is that your advice is always mediocre at best, including your behemoth intern thread
His advice was very helpful. I didn't do exactly what he said, but he responded and gave me a reasonable point of view to consider. Between him and Law2Doc I got some helpful suggestions.