Kinocilium

10+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2009
33
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Minneapolis
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So I really don't see how relevant it is that I should enter my parents and siblings, but I've heard that it can only help. I entered my older sister, and I'm not sure what to do about my brother, who died when he was 16 (8 years ago).

I haven't mentioned my brother anywhere else on my application. I feel like it's kind of sleazy if use that situation to get into medical school, but on the other hand it was obviously an experience that played a big factor in my life, and it's the only really difficult thing I had to go through in my otherwise relatively privileged life.

Has anyone else here lost a sibling and mentioned it in their application somewhere? What are your thoughts? Does it even matter? I assume they don't really look that much at the family section anyway, right?

Oh, and I can't write "deceased" in the age box because it only allows for 3 characters. Maybe I could just leave it at 16 and if they ask questions at the interview I'll be more specific?
 

adeline

idk my bff ***?
Jul 24, 2009
273
0
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put in xx as his age
 
Jul 7, 2009
49
0
The Lone Star State
Status
Pre-Medical
I haven't mentioned my brother anywhere else on my application. I feel like it's kind of sleazy if use that situation to get into medical school, but on the other hand it was obviously an experience that played a big factor in my life, and it's the only really difficult thing I had to go through in my otherwise relatively privileged life.
Although I would never pretend to understand what it would be like to have a sibling die, I am in a somewhat similar boat in that I have grown up with a brother with a severe developmental disability. In my opinion, I don't think it is sleazy at all to talk about that in your secondaries/personal statement. For me, I know that my experiences growing up with my brother have definitely affected my own character development and make me see things differently from others with neurotypical siblings. Your situation has profoundly affected you I'm sure. In order to have the AdCom know as much about you as possible, I don't think there is anything wrong with discussing how you have been impacted/what you have learned from your life experiences.
 

BerlinDude

7+ Year Member
Jul 2, 2009
528
5
Status
So I really don't see how relevant it is that I should enter my parents and siblings, but I've heard that it can only help. I entered my older sister, and I'm not sure what to do about my brother, who died when he was 16 (8 years ago).

I haven't mentioned my brother anywhere else on my application. I feel like it's kind of sleazy if use that situation to get into medical school, but on the other hand it was obviously an experience that played a big factor in my life, and it's the only really difficult thing I had to go through in my otherwise relatively privileged life.

Has anyone else here lost a sibling and mentioned it in their application somewhere? What are your thoughts? Does it even matter? I assume they don't really look that much at the family section anyway, right?

Oh, and I can't write "deceased" in the age box because it only allows for 3 characters. Maybe I could just leave it at 16 and if they ask questions at the interview I'll be more specific?
You're not the only one who thinks the question is irrelevant. If they really want to know about your family they can admit you and meet them at graduation.

I wouldn't shy away from mentioning your brother. It's not sleazy to bring it up and it gives a better idea of who you are as a person.
 
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Kinocilium

10+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2009
33
0
Minneapolis
Status
Although I would never pretend to understand what it would be like to have a sibling die, I am in a somewhat similar boat in that I have grown up with a brother with a severe developmental disability. In my opinion, I don't think it is sleazy at all to talk about that in your secondaries/personal statement. For me, I know that my experiences growing up with my brother have definitely affected my own character development and make me see things differently from others with neurotypical siblings. Your situation has profoundly affected you I'm sure. In order to have the AdCom know as much about you as possible, I don't think there is anything wrong with discussing how you have been impacted/what you have learned from your life experiences.
hmm... maybe "sleazy" was the wrong word. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the experience obviously helped shape who I am, but I'm pretty sure it didn't affect my decision to become a doctor, which came much later. I just don't want to "use" his death as an advantage. I think I'm treading lightly mostly for myself so I don't feel guilty about it, and I thought I'd see what others in similar situations did. I think it's just weird for me because it's something I don't talk about a lot with people, so why should I now? Here I'm thinking more about bringing it up in the essay or something (I'm in the process of brainstorming now)... I guess I don't have much of a problem listing him as a sibling. I think I get what you're saying though, thanks!
 
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Kinocilium

10+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2009
33
0
Minneapolis
Status

adeline

idk my bff ***?
Jul 24, 2009
273
0
Status