Where would you attend?

  • Mount Sinai

    Votes: 65 46.8%
  • Cornell

    Votes: 74 53.2%

  • Total voters
    139
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schizosquirrel

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I was accepted at both and am trying to decide where to attend. I'm interested in research/career in academia, but I also have a strong desire to do a lot of community service work while in medical school.

I'm leaning Sinai as of now, as I thought the students seemed more relaxed, I liked the P/F, they have an awesome institute for stem cell research (I'm into that), and I thought the location so close to Central Park was great.

I also liked Cornell a lot too, and I know it's higher ranked/more prestigious in a lot of circles. And, specifically because I'm interested in going into academia I know this can be a factor.

Any thoughts?
 
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I was accepted at both and am trying to decide where to attend. I'm interested in research/career in academia, but I also have a strong desire to do a lot of community service work while in medical school.

I'm leaning Sinai as of now, as I thought the students seemed more relaxed, I liked the P/F, they have an awesome institute for stem cell research (I'm into that), and I thought the location so close to Central Park was great.

I also liked Cornell a lot too, and I know it's higher ranked/more prestigious in a lot of circles. And, specifically because I'm interested in going into academia I know this can be a factor.

Any thoughts?
it's pretty clear that you'd be a better fit for Sinai
 

schizosquirrel

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it's pretty clear that you'd be a better fit for Sinai
Sorry, I did like Cornell as well...I'm just leaning Sinai. I think I meshed better with Cornell's curriculum and research focus, and I liked the fact that you could live in apartment style studios as 2nd-4th year.
 

Infinitydrop

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i would go to cornell given that money is equal. People say that prestige doesn't matter, but guess what my dad wanted to get a pretty risky procedure a while ago and he researched the doctors and picked the harvard guy, COULDN"T get an appt because he was booked and went for the cornell one next. So even though the prestige doesn't matter in turns of which education you will eventually get, it matters to be average american.
 

naijaboi

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I would go to Cornell because of their hospital affiliations - NYP, Hospital for Special Surgery and MSKCC. They are all top institutions. Mount Sinai is an amazing school - especially when it comes to community service work, but you'll get more than enough opportunities to do that at Cornell as well. Their rankings are negligible though - Cornell and 18 and Mt. Sinai at 22 and rising. I don't think the rankings should matter.
 

schizosquirrel

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Thanks guys. Anyone who interviewed at both....or was accepted at both, have anything to chime in on?
 

BlueElmo

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Tough choice, you can't go wrong with either one. But it does seem you prefer Sinai.
 

dw2158

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Thanks guys. Anyone who interviewed at both....or was accepted at both, have anything to chime in on?
:hello:

i'd pick (and probably am picking) sinai. i'm interested in working with an impoverished urban community and while cornell has done a lot to boost its "helping people" reputation, the fact of the matter is that many (most? not sure) of their doctors and hospitals don't take ANY insurance, let alone public health insurance. (i know this because i'm a patient there, and had a ridiculously hard time finding a specialist because of this, and i spoke at length with the specialist i did find about this issue.)

just one thing to consider. may be a bigger deal for me than it is for you-- i just think it says something about the personalities of the two different institutions.

editing to add: i know i'm going to get bashed by current cornell students for posting this. i really don't mean any disrespect towards your school; it's just not the place where i see myself being happy and achieving my professional goals.
 

naijaboi

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Thanks guys. Anyone who interviewed at both....or was accepted at both, have anything to chime in on?
I was accepted to both. I am going to neither, but I would have chosen Cornell. They seem to have an excellent global health program and I liked the smaller class size (more attention to students, I think). I also liked that classes ended at 1pm. I think that Sinai runs a little bit longer. For me, Cornell would have also been the cheaper option - thanks to need-based aid.

The students at Cornell did seem a bit more high strung, but I was at Mt. Sinai a day before thanksgiving, and met only a few students - so I don't know how friendly their student body is.

I would like to match into NYP or MSKCC; Cornell seems easier to match from than Sinai.
 

jbz24

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Cornell and Sinai are so different that it shouldn't be a terribly hard decision. You can't go wrong with either one.
 

mdeast

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I'm WLed at Cornell, but accepted at Sinai. I think they are very different places, but I actually liked them both.

Sinai is very liberal artsy, community health oriented, but they also are a ridiculously well funded research institution.

Cornell seemed to be a little bit more basic science focused, but they did have an awesome global health program.

I thought the Sinai kids were also more chill, but the Cornell students did seem to have a lot of fun (especially getting out at 1 PM most days during your first 2 years).

To be honest, if I got in off the waitlist, I don't know what I'd do. I like both, but for different reasons.
 

dw2158

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I'm WLed at Cornell, but accepted at Sinai. I think they are very different places, but I actually liked them both.

Sinai is very liberal artsy, community health oriented, but they also are a ridiculously well funded research institution.

Cornell seemed to be a little bit more basic science focused, but they did have an awesome global health program.

I thought the Sinai kids were also more chill, but the Cornell students did seem to have a lot of fun (especially getting out at 1 PM most days during your first 2 years).

To be honest, if I got in off the waitlist, I don't know what I'd do. I like both, but for different reasons.
bolded = why sinai is my fave :D
 

Dr Lyss

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Ouch a lot of Cornell bashing I see! Haha it's okay. I love my school and I came here specifically for the opportunities they have to get involved in community health, global health, and health disparities (both in research and in clinical work).

NYP is a big bougie hospital, BUT that's not the only hospital we work at. We are all over the city. Look at our community affiliates and that's where you will be doing your rotations. For first years, our clinical placements ranged from MSK to Brooklyn Community to Westchester to Lincoln ER to Spanish Harlem to AIDS clinics and everything in between.

I think Sinai has a great program, especially when it comes to community service, but don't assume that their hospital runs much differently. I've worked very closely with a health center affiliated with Mt. Sinai and they are constantly fighting to get their patients without insurance seen. It happens everywhere unfortunately.


If you have more specific questions I'm happy to answer. I think you should go where you feel you would mesh better and have all the opportunities available to you. That's why I chose Cornell. Don't let the UES neighborhood and the big hospitals fool you. I know we have somehow received that reputation, but its not reality. If you ever want to come by and find out for yourself I can set that up too.

Good luck!
 

dw2158

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Ouch a lot of Cornell bashing I see! Haha it's okay. I love my school and I came here specifically for the opportunities they have to get involved in community health, global health, and health disparities (both in research and in clinical work).

NYP is a big bougie hospital, BUT that's not the only hospital we work at. We are all over the city. Look at our community affiliates and that's where you will be doing your rotations. For first years, our clinical placements ranged from MSK to Brooklyn Community to Westchester to Lincoln ER to Spanish Harlem to AIDS clinics and everything in between.

I think Sinai has a great program, especially when it comes to community service, but don't assume that their hospital runs much differently. I've worked very closely with a health center affiliated with Mt. Sinai and they are constantly fighting to get their patients without insurance seen. It happens everywhere unfortunately.


If you have more specific questions I'm happy to answer. I think you should go where you feel you would mesh better and have all the opportunities available to you. That's why I chose Cornell. Don't let the UES neighborhood and the big hospitals fool you. I know we have somehow received that reputation, but its not reality. If you ever want to come by and find out for yourself I can set that up too.

Good luck!
bolded = VERY different than what i was talking about. many NYP, HSS, and MSKCC doctors do not take insurance. as in, if you go to them, you must pay out of pocket. that's a whooooole different type of patient population. i haven't found this to be the case at sinai, where my (pretty awesome) employer health insurance has been readily accepted by my PCP, the ER, and a couple of specialists.

and i totally understand that cornell works with hospitals besides the 3 i named, and that the school has opportunities to work in community health-- and good for you if you're taking advantage of them. cornell just has a very different personality than sinai. works for some people and not for others.
 

jbz24

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For what it's worth, I'm sure that's not the norm and most physicians at Cornell take insurance. Without a doubt though, they have different personalities. Cornell's been trying to shed their private-y reputation though, and I definitely think they've been making some progress...

In terms of MSKCC, it's only affiliated but not a main clinical site of Cornell. MSKCC has its own residency/fellowship programs. Residents from NYU, SLR, and I think some other places rotate through MSKCC. Chief residents I believe are also NYU and SLR, not just Cornell. It's definitely a great place for heme/onc research, so for the OP, if you have any inkling of going into Heme/Onc, I would recommend Cornell over Sinai. In terms of other research though, you'll be fine at either program. Sinai pulls in more NIH funding than Cornell, although it probably won't matter much to a med student.
 

Dr Lyss

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bolded = VERY different than what i was talking about. many NYP, HSS, and MSKCC doctors do not take insurance. as in, if you go to them, you must pay out of pocket. that's a whooooole different type of patient population. i haven't found this to be the case at sinai, where my (pretty awesome) employer health insurance has been readily accepted by my PCP, the ER, and a couple of specialists.

and i totally understand that cornell works with hospitals besides the 3 i named, and that the school has opportunities to work in community health-- and good for you if you're taking advantage of them. cornell just has a very different personality than sinai. works for some people and not for others.
Not accepting YOUR insurance is very different than not taking insurance. They take my insurance all the time. In fact, knock yourself out Put in your insurance company and see your options at NYP.

The schools have very different personalities and are located in two very different communities so I agree whole heartedly... but arguing that a school/hospital isn't good because they don't take your insurance (or don't have many doctors that do) is kind of silly. Of course we take insurance. I mean, NYP-Cornell and NYP-Columbia is one of the biggest hospital networks (actually I think it is) in the city! To say that most of our specialists don't is a lie. Our patients come from so many different neighborhoods/backgrounds that we would be bankrupt if we didn't! Sorry, that's just not true.
 
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dw2158

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Not accepting YOUR insurance is very different than not taking insurance. They take my insurance all the time. In fact, knock yourself out Put in your insurance company and see your options at NYP.

The schools have very different personalities and are located in two very different communities so I agree whole heartedly... but arguing that a school/hospital isn't good because they don't take your insurance (or don't have many doctors that do) is kind of silly. Of course we take insurance. To say that most of our specialists don't is a lie. Sorry.
ok, Lyss... i don't want to fight with you. i'll just say that i came across many doctors who did not take ANY insurance. not once did i say that there were no doctors who took insurance. i believe my exact words were "many (most? don't know)."

i'm happy you're happy at cornell.
 

jbz24

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ok, Lyss... i don't want to fight with you. i'll just say that i came across many doctors who did not take ANY insurance. not once did i say that there were no doctors who took insurance. i believe my exact words were "many (most? don't know)."

i'm happy you're happy at cornell.
These might be doctors with privileges at Cornell but are not faculty at Cornell.
 

dw2158

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These might be doctors with privileges at Cornell but are not faculty at Cornell.
ok, i'm so very unbelievably wrong. :rolleyes:
can we be done with this please?

(though to me, it doesn't matter if they're faculty or not. it's just the personality of the institution... which i have clearly misjudged and i'm a terribly ignorant human being. flogging myself as i type.)
 

jbz24

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ok, i'm so very unbelievably wrong. :rolleyes:
can we be done with this please?

(though to me, it doesn't matter if they're faculty or not. it's just the personality of the institution... which i have clearly misjudged and i'm a terribly ignorant human being. flogging myself as i type.)
Nah, I agree with you about the personality of the institution.

Just trying to give Cornell it's fair share since Sinai is my place :)
 
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Dr Lyss

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ok, i'm so very unbelievably wrong. :rolleyes:
can we be done with this please?

(though to me, it doesn't matter if they're faculty or not. it's just the personality of the institution... which i have clearly misjudged and i'm a terribly ignorant human being. flogging myself as i type.)
lol it's ok! I'm sorry if I came off kinda aggressive. It's my long winded way of saying "that's not 100% true." :D


But in terms of personality of our home institution, sure I'll definitely agree. The hospital is "bougie." But the students/education aren't, I promise :) But I just think people should judge the "personality" of Cornell by coming here, not what you hear from others or preconceived notions. I thought the same thing and I spent a summer here and I was shocked. Unfortunately, most people don't get that opportunity so they never see it.

I <3 u DW!
 

dw2158

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lol it's ok! I'm sorry if I came off kinda aggressive. It's my long winded way of saying "that's not 100% true." :D


But in terms of personality of our home institution, sure I'll definitely agree. The hospital is "bougie." But the students aren't, I promise :)

I <3 u DW!
oh i know! i totally liked the students i met. like i said before, i just didn't feel it was the place where i'd be happiest. but it is refreshing to hear you talk about it-- gets me excited for school in general :)
 

Dr Lyss

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oh i know! i totally liked the students i met. like i said before, i just didn't feel it was the place where i'd be happiest. but it is refreshing to hear you talk about it-- gets me excited for school in general :)
THIS is what's important. And you should be excited. Medical school is lots of fun... but I need to get off this website before I fail (that won't be as fun I think) ;)
 

mdeast

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Wow, I missed quite the debate. I'm sort of surprised that Cornell and Sinai seem so closely tied in this poll. Usually when we have these things up, everyone just seems to fall in with whatever US News rankings tell us to believe.

I think both schools do have a different culture, but they're both top research institutions, with hospital networks throughout the boroughs. Either way you're living in NYC on the Upper East Side and getting a fantastic education.
 

jbz24

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Wow, I missed quite the debate. I'm sort of surprised that Cornell and Sinai seem so closely tied in this poll. Usually when we have these things up, everyone just seems to fall in with whatever US News rankings tell us to believe.

I think both schools do have a different culture, but they're both top research institutions, with hospital networks throughout the boroughs. Either way you're living in NYC on the Upper East Side and getting a fantastic education.
Yeah, I somehow ended up on the wrong side of the debate! Hopefully dw won't take offense :p
 
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I interviewed at both schools and IMO there isn't even a question: Cornell all the way.

Sinai has a solid program but Cornell is well known and has tons of resources. You want to do something, they will find a way to help you do it.... and the students seemed really chill.

But that's just me. Good luck
 

vivical

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Imma MD/PhD student at Sinai (disclaimer), so concerning your academic questions:
1) Sinai's an up and coming institution, rather than a static or declining one. This is reflected in the top professors they've been recruiting over the last 5+ years from institutions around the country, as well as the brand new state of the medical research center that's being built even in a recession. Sinai's Stem Cell Institute is a well funded and very productive program being led by Ihor Lemischka, a big shot recent recruit out of MIT.
2) It's a very collaborative environment, which makes a difference in your experience there. You can work with great PIs without the boiler room mentality other places (e.g Columbia, a notoriously anti-collaborative place where people are so worried about sharing data with people in their own department, lest they get scooped.).

As for other aspects, remember that Sinai is at the interface of East Harlem and the Upper East Side (unlike Cornell, strictly in the UES). This means that you'll not only get to see both the rich guy with a coronary, but also a recent immigrant with TB. The book knowledge always sticks better when you see a real patient. Also, Sinai's big on community service. EHHOP is a student-founded and run clinic that has won several state/federal awards and funding. They also run a large community health fair every spring that draws large numbers from east harlem.
 

Steeler7588

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I've been waitlisted at both, but liked Cornell way better. I spent a significant amount of time with the students outside of the interview day and was very impressed. I'm not going to disparage Sinai or anything, but let's just say I was less than enthused with that aspect of the school. It's a shame too, because I was very excited about the school before I visited. Just a lot of little things ended up rubbing me the wrong way. I guess in terms of more practical reasons, I'm interested in doing research abroad and Cornell >>> Sinai in that respect, but you might not be interested in that.

I ended up leaving the schools knowing neither was where I'd ideally like to spend next year, but there were some nice things about both of them. I thought Cornell was an overall more positive experience. However, Sinai's view of Central Park from the anatomy lab = pretty amazing, even if it's an ultimately trivial plus to the school.
 

dw2158

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I've been waitlisted at both, but liked Cornell way better. I spent a significant amount of time with the students outside of the interview day and was very impressed. I'm not going to disparage Sinai or anything, but let's just say I was less than enthused with that aspect of the school. It's a shame too, because I was very excited about the school before I visited. Just a lot of little things ended up rubbing me the wrong way. I guess in terms of more practical reasons, I'm interested in doing research abroad and Cornell >>> Sinai in that respect, but you might not be interested in that.

I ended up leaving the schools knowing neither was where I'd ideally like to spend next year, but there were some nice things about both of them. I thought Cornell was an overall more positive experience. However, Sinai's view of Central Park from the anatomy lab = pretty amazing, even if it's an ultimately trivial plus to the school.
for clarification-- you didn't like the students at sinai? because they weren't impressive? i'm genuinely asking; no one try to jump down my throat please
 

Steeler7588

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for clarification-- you didn't like the students at sinai? because they weren't impressive? i'm genuinely asking; no one try to jump down my throat please
Right. It wasn't anything about their qualifications, I'm sure they've all accomplished a lot, but I was a little put off by how socially poor the few I met were. Granted, I was only able to meet a small group through my hosting experience and it's not a very fair assessment of the entire student body, but when it happens to you personally, it's hard to shake that bias, you know? One of the guys I met (out of 5-6) and both tour guides were very cool, so I'm sure it was probably an aberration.

Also, one of the students who came in to the office while we were waiting "warned" me about how the school "misled" her about their international opportunities. Exact words used. I hadn't met a student at any other school who spoke about their own institution in that manner, so that was a little weird for me.

And no worries, I'm not going to jump down your throat. Like I said, I came back from my Manhattan trip knowing neither school was the best fit for me, so I have no reason to favor one over the other from that standpoint.
 

dw2158

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Right. It wasn't anything about their qualifications, I'm sure they've all accomplished a lot, but I was a little put off by how socially poor the few I met were. Granted, I was only able to meet a small group through my hosting experience and it's not a very fair assessment of the entire student body, but when it happens to you personally, it's hard to shake that bias, you know? One of the guys I met (out of 5-6) and both tour guides were very cool, so I'm sure it was probably an aberration.

Also, one of the students who came in to the office while we were waiting "warned" me about how the school "misled" her about their international opportunities. Exact words used. I hadn't met a student at any other school who spoke about their own institution in that manner, so that was a little weird for me.

And no worries, I'm not going to jump down your throat. Like I said, I came back from my Manhattan trip knowing neither school was the best fit for me, so I have no reason to favor one over the other from that standpoint.
i totally know what you mean about the randomness of it all in terms of the people you happen to speak to when you're visiting... i think that's further proof that taking certain general things into account (geographic location, for example) we could all be happy at pretty much any school-- as much anyone may not want to admit that. because (even though you didn't) you could just as easily have run into the awkward or unhappy students at cornell, you know? it all depends.
 

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Mount Sinai offers multiple global health opportunities via their Global Health Center (http://www.mssm-ghc.org/partner_sites). Students have spent summers in Kenya doing field work, Tanzania distributing malaria nets, and India doing community-based healthcare. They also have a popular Valladolid summer exchange program where students travel to Spain to observe healthcare abroad and improve their Spanish speaking skills. In addition, every year, the Medical Students Making Impacts (MSMI) group sends students to Belize to do medical missions and Liberia to do surgical missions. And for those who desire to have a global impact without ever leaving NYC, Mount Sinai REMEDY (http://students.mssm.edu/groups/remedy/) collects and donates recycled medical supplies to developing countries that would otherwise be thrown away.

I also wanted to reinforce how big community service is at Sinai. Their pass/fail system allows students in their first two years to devote an EXCEPTIONAL amount of time to serving their community, from the EHHOP free clinic to the annual community health fair (featuring a special guest visit from Magic Johnson this year!). Of note, the AAMC recently awarded Mount Sinai the prestigious Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service, awarded to only ONE institution annually (http://www.aamc.org/about/awards/2009/ocsa_mtsinai.htm).

If you're still undecided between Sinai vs. Cornell, I think the student housing will overwhelmingly favor Sinai. Sinai's heavily subsidized housing is RIDICULOUSLY cheap; rent is only ~$550 a month (which is unheard of in NYC!). The suite setup is arguably the best med student housing offered in NYC. You have a common room/kitchen, singles!, and two bathrooms per suite unlike some other NYC med schools where first year students have to share communal (ick!) bathrooms and/or kitchens in the hallway. Plus there is a recently renovated gym, recently renovated laundry facilities, recently renovated lounge (w/ foosball table and flat screen tv), and basketball courts and tennis/handball walls in the courtyard. And Central Park is only TWO blocks away for those who like to jog, ride bikes, play frisbee, play soccer, or study under the sun!

And on a totally unrelated note, President Bill Clinton is slated to be this year's commencement speaker in Lincoln Center!
 
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Steeler7588

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i totally know what you mean about the randomness of it all in terms of the people you happen to speak to when you're visiting... i think that's further proof that taking certain general things into account (geographic location, for example) we could all be happy at pretty much any school-- as much anyone may not want to admit that. because (even though you didn't) you could just as easily have run into the awkward or unhappy students at cornell, you know? it all depends.
100% truth. And it sucks, because I knew as I started my Sinai interview day, that my experience was going to be tainted. I have to admit, though, I've heard of poor hosting experiences pretty often with Sinai... maybe a little stricter screening for student volunteers is needed?
loljkttyl said:
Mount Sinai offers multiple global health opportunities via their Global Health Center (http://www.mssm-ghc.org/partner_sites). Students have spent summers in Kenya doing field work, Tanzania distributing malaria nets, and India doing community-based healthcare. They also have a popular Valladolid summer exchange program where students travel to Spain to observe healthcare abroad and improve their Spanish speaking skills. In addition, every year, the Medical Students Making Impacts (MSMI) group sends students travel to Belize to do medical missions and Liberia to do surgical missions.
I didn't mean to imply I thought Sinai was poor in global health, that was just how one of the students put it. I think she was more upset about there not being a substantial partnership in South America than anything else, though. However, I do think their international stuff pales in comparison to Cornell's. However, that's nothing bad - I think Cornell offered the most impressive international stuff of any of the schools I interviewed at.
 

mdeast

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100% truth. And it sucks, because I knew as I started my Sinai interview day, that my experience was going to be tainted. I have to admit, though, I've heard of poor hosting experiences pretty often with Sinai... maybe a little stricter screening for student volunteers is needed?

I didn't mean to imply I thought Sinai was poor in global health, that was just how one of the students put it. I think she was more upset about there not being a substantial partnership in South America than anything else, though. However, I do think their international stuff pales in comparison to Cornell's. However, that's nothing bad - I think Cornell offered the most impressive international stuff of any of the schools I interviewed at.
Just on a side note, I've actually heard from a lot of Cornell students that the international opportunities are way less impressive than they are touted on interview day. People definitely do go abroad the summer after MS1 and during fourth year rotations, but not even nearly the "almost everyone" that the dean talks about in his talk. I'd like to do some more brief third world clinical workk (i.e. a one week medical/surgical trip). This isn't the type of medicine I plan on eventually practicing, but I think it definitely enlightens you to conditions around the world and the roles we as doctors can play on affecting global health. What I really do want to do is spend some more time in an European or East Asian developed country, particularly those with socialized healthcare systems, because I'm really, really into the idea of policy and health care structure. Plus, it'd be fun to live abroad (even if it's only for a month). Cornell has a program in Paris, which sounds really intriguing to me.

But really. You can do away rotations (both abroad and domestic) at any medical school really.
 

justinbaily

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100% truth. And it sucks, because I knew as I started my Sinai interview day, that my experience was going to be tainted. I have to admit, though, I've heard of poor hosting experiences pretty often with Sinai... maybe a little stricter screening for student volunteers is needed?
Just to add my two cents, my hosting experience at Sinai was amazing. My two hosts actually left their lecture to let me into their building when I arrived ahead of schedule and spoke to me at length about their school, the city and medicine in general. I had forgotten to bring my coat, so they provided me with jackets, hats, gloves, etc so that I could go explore the city that night, and they invited me to a party that they were having with some other students. It was great. It also holds the distinction of being the only school at which my host and I were able to discuss our mutual interest in both Faulkner and molec research. The students who streamed into the interview waiting-room were quirky and pleasant. I did not apply to Cornell--although I wish that I had--so I can't compare the two. It obviously has a great reputation, world-class hospital affiliates and a location that rivals Sinai's, depending on what you're looking for. The facilities look superb and I hear that they have the money to fund whatever opportunities you would like to pursue. It looks like the majority of their apartments are located on Roosevelt Island, but they look beautiful on the Cornell website.

Obviously, outside of the city everyone will have heard of Cornell, but I have yet to meet a single person outside of medicine who has ever heard of Sinai, which I find a little bit sad. I don't know if something like that matters to you, though. Both are awesome.
 

Steeler7588

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Just on a side note, I've actually heard from a lot of Cornell students that the international opportunities are way less impressive than they are touted on interview day.
It's not really a matter of the actual programs you can do, but the funding they provide you. Every student is given what, $3500, straight off the bat? Compared to other similarly ranked schools who actually limit the number of students who can go abroad during the summer using school funding, I found that quite impressive.
 

loljkttyl

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Just wanted to point out that Mount Sinai is generous with funding in other areas. Every student receives a free (top of the line cardiology) stethoscope at the White Coat Ceremony. Every student group now gets $100 for food (which is a lot!) per meeting. They are also more generous than other schools with funding students to go on medical student conferences. They also have a Recreation Office which offers discounts to movie tickets, Broadway shows, US Open tennis tickets, and baseball games (sometimes tickets to the NY Mets for as cheap as $3!!!), etc. I have even heard of students snagging free concert tickets to Lincoln Center and NY Giants football tickets from generous attendings. In the past, class social chairs have secured free tickets to the David Letterman show. Sinai's location also allows you take advantage of other free perks around the area. Its prime location allows you to easily walk into Central Park to watch the NY Philharmonic play for free on the Great Lawn during the summer. You can walk two blocks to Fifth Avenue and watch the runners whiz past you during the NYC Marathon. And it is within walking distance to both the Guggenheim Museum (which has pay what you wish Saturdays), the Metropolitan Museum of Art (which has pay what you wish everyday), Museum of the City of New York (free with Sinai ID), the National Design Museum, the Jewish Museum, etc. Of note, Mount Sinai has an innovative art appreciation course (as featured in the NY Times!) designed to hone the observation skills of future physicians where students get multiple free guided tours of selected artwork/sculptures at the Met during their geriatrics rotation.
 
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Xoyes

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At Cornell revisit they mentioned that the curriculum will likely become pass/fail next year. I wonder if that will convince people to lean towards Cornell now. I really like the pass/fail and testing system at Sinai since it provides some flexibility to do research and community service, but I am more attracted to the type of research being done at Cornell. I still can't decide but I'm looking forward to Sinai revisit!
 

edfig99

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I find the whole "pass/fail" thing as one of those factors that current applicants are using to choose among schools fascinating. I know the rationale and justification and I don't necessarily disagree with it (nor do I think h/p/f in preclin is a big deal to begin with). But as a criterion for choosing a school, it's definitely something I've only seen in the last year or two in admissions.

If a school is pass/fail but the faculty have decided that the cutoff for passing is 90%, is that really less stressful than an h/p/f system? I'm just curious.

To the original poster, you have no bad choices. see which one fits better for your personality and your finances, and that's your choice.
 

jbz24

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Jan 22, 2010
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I find the whole "pass/fail" thing as one of those factors that current applicants are using to choose among schools fascinating. I know the rationale and justification and I don't necessarily disagree with it (nor do I think h/p/f in preclin is a big deal to begin with). But as a criterion for choosing a school, it's definitely something I've only seen in the last year or two in admissions.

If a school is pass/fail but the faculty have decided that the cutoff for passing is 90%, is that really less stressful than an h/p/f system? I'm just curious.

To the original poster, you have no bad choices. see which one fits better for your personality and your finances, and that's your choice.
It's been an issue for a while now. I know when I applied 4 years ago it was an important consideration then. Also generally the bar is set pretty low for pass/fail such that it's very hard to fail. I remember at my school passing was above 40 or 50 while averages for exams were in the 70s or 80s.
 

edfig99

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It's been an issue for a while now. I know when I applied 4 years ago it was an important consideration then. Also generally the bar is set pretty low for pass/fail such that it's very hard to fail. I remember at my school passing was above 40 or 50 while averages for exams were in the 70s or 80s.
by recently i meant this is the first year I was asked by applicants during the interview specifically about our grading system. The issue really didn't come up much during my last few years of interviewing.

40/50 for passing? I don't foresee our bar being set that low if p/f happens, but I'm only speculating as I won't be a part of the committee that comes up with the final recommendations. I can think of certain basic science faculty that would definitely want to bring the passing score higher if honors disappears. It'll certainly be a culture shift, more for the faculty than the students, if/when it happens.

anyway, didn't mean to hijack the thread.
 

jbz24

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by recently i meant this is the first year I was asked by applicants during the interview specifically about our grading system. The issue really didn't come up much during my last few years of interviewing.

40/50 for passing? I don't foresee our bar being set that low if p/f happens, but I'm only speculating as I won't be a part of the committee that comes up with the final recommendations. I can think of certain basic science faculty that would definitely want to bring the passing score higher if honors disappears. It'll certainly be a culture shift, more for the faculty than the students, if/when it happens.

anyway, didn't mean to hijack the thread.
I think it's a good point. Actually I want to retract the 40/50 comment, I just took a look and it's 50s or 60s. I don't think there was any set cutoff for passing though. It was basically set so that everyone passes unless someone is drastically below the average (like one test the average was a 70 and someone got a 20).
 

mdeast

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I think it's a good point. Actually I want to retract the 40/50 comment, I just took a look and it's 50s or 60s. I don't think there was any set cutoff for passing though. It was basically set so that everyone passes unless someone is drastically below the average (like one test the average was a 70 and someone got a 20).
Hmmm, interesting. I thought it would have been higher. I know Penn has it at 70. My friends here used to do what they called "riding the 69 train" (no sexual reference intended)...because they were usually forgiven if they got close enough....a simple "don't do it again, slap on the wrist" if they were far below that.

At my Stanford interview they had just gotten a neuro exam back and about 12 students had failed. Freaked me out a bit.
 

Xoyes

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What kind of research are you interested in?
I'm interested in public health and health disparities research, and I know both schools have centers devoted specifically to those issues (part of the reason I applied to both schools). One reason I'm attracted to research at Cornell is because I am already collaborating with someone at the school in my current job. I'm sure that I could find some interesting research at Sinai that I could become involved in, but it's just nice to be able to continue research at Cornell that 1) I am familiar with, 2) I have already devoted a lot of time to, and 3) I know I enjoy :) However, part of me wants to branch out and do something a bit different just to see what's out there. So yeah, I'm still trying to decide...
 

jbz24

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I'm interested in public health and health disparities research, and I know both schools have centers devoted specifically to those issues (part of the reason I applied to both schools). One reason I'm attracted to research at Cornell is because I am already collaborating with someone at the school in my current job. I'm sure that I could find some interesting research at Sinai that I could become involved in, but it's just nice to be able to continue research at Cornell that 1) I am familiar with, 2) I have already devoted a lot of time to, and 3) I know I enjoy :) However, part of me wants to branch out and do something a bit different just to see what's out there. So yeah, I'm still trying to decide...
Yeah I wouldn't be able to help you much with that anyway. Good luck with your decision.
 
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