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pfaction

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Going crazy, cannot find this in my books, but know it from school. True or false?
 

typicalindian

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Isn't it both? sympathetic works to restrict blood flow and parasympathetic will work to dilate the vessels.
 

pfaction

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As far as I know I don't think paraNS exists in the blood vessels...and I'm doubly not sure about skin. I could google it.....

 

typicalindian

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ohh I think I remember something from my physio course about this, let me know if this makes sense to you:

Blood vessels have inherent tone, so when sympathetic stimulation increases, they can further constrict, and when sympathetic stimulation is removed, they can relax.
 
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pfaction

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That I do know for a while since a lot of drugs act to remove that tone from the vessels. Same with the heart and paraNS: If there was no dual innervation, the heart is either on or off, no inbetween, same with vessels.
 

Charles_Carmichael

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ohh I think I remember something from my physio course about this, let me know if this makes sense to you:

Blood vessels have inherent tone, so when sympathetic stimulation increases, they can further constrict, and when sympathetic stimulation is removed, they can relax.
It's not a matter of sympathetic stimulation causes vasoconstriction while removing sympathetic stimulation causes vasodilation.

Sympathetic activity causes vasoconstriction and vasodilation depending on what adrenergic receptors (the receptors that norepi/epi bind to) are present in the vasculature in different areas of the body.
 

typicalindian

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It's not a matter of sympathetic stimulation causes vasoconstriction while removing sympathetic stimulation causes vasodilation.

Sympathetic activity causes vasoconstriction and vasodilation depending on what adrenergic receptors (the receptors that norepi/epi bind to) are present in the vasculature in different areas of the body.

OH! Yeah yeah thank you do much! Now I remember everything about the alpha/beta 1 and 2 receptors. Can't believe I forgot about those.
 
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