SMC123

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Jun 30, 2009
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1. Would it be a good idea to take a binder consisting of copies of certificates and awards, with addition to letters of recommendation from volunteer organizations for proof?

2. I have read that it is recommended to take a portfolio or folder to an interview. What do people put in the this? Just loose leaf paper to take notes on during the interview? (Maybe a copy of a resume to pass out ?)

3. How many questions does a student usually ask?

4. I am worried about how to conclude the interview. How does one thank the interviewers the right way?
 

TexasTriathlete

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1. No, that would be highly gay.
2. Yeah, that's fine. If you want to take notes, bring something like that along. Probably not a bad idea.
3. How many questions do you have? What do you want to know about the school in question?
4. Say thank you and shake hands.
 
OP
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SMC123

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Jun 30, 2009
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awww, thank you for your quick response. It was so thoughtful. I really appreciate your helpfulness, wish you all the best in medical school.
 

msd848

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HAHAHA.. this is hilarious!

On a serious note, do a lot of people take portfolios into interviews or go empty handed?

I really don't see how it would be beneficial to pass out my resume to them?

I am pretty sure nobody takes there personal statement activities copy into the interview do they?
 

Semicolon

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I personally never brought a folder/portfolio or copies of anything; I figured they already had the copies I sent them. Never had issues. I've heard of people simply taking empty folders/portfolios with them just so it looks like they have something. :shrug:

As for questions, just ask what you feel would be perceived as thoughtful/insightful. Make your questions relevant and show interest in actually attending the school (ask questions pertaining to student life there and what you can expect). Above all, try to ask questions you actually care to hear the answers to! Don't only ask for the sake of asking.

As for ending the interview, it'll just sorta go with the flow. It's never been awkward for me. They usually end the interview asking you if you have any questions, at which point you should always ask something (read above), then you can acknowledge their responses, make a concluding remark if necessary (like stating that the interview has been very helpful, etc.), then you all get up, shake hands, and you give your thanks. It's nothing nerve-wrecking.
 

JanikeyDoc

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1. Would it be a good idea to take a binder consisting of copies of certificates and awards, with addition to letters of recommendation from volunteer organizations for proof?

2. I have read that it is recommended to take a portfolio or folder to an interview. What do people put in the this? Just loose leaf paper to take notes on during the interview? (Maybe a copy of a resume to pass out ?)

3. How many questions does a student usually ask?

4. I am worried about how to conclude the interview. How does one thank the interviewers the right way?
The best thing is to keep copies of your primary, especially your PS, and also keep your secondary, and study it before hand for the interview. I heard a lot of schools will often ask you interview questions relating to whatever your wrote on your personal statement.

From what I heard is that DO interviews tend to be more relaxed, so its best to keep a relaxed demeanor. I have heard they are more like a way to just get to know you and to see if they like you, which is a bit unfair and biased, because it seems like the interviewer has to like you for you to be successful.
 

Semicolon

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If you've worked on your PS enough, you should already know pretty darn well what you've written without a copy. :D I never understood why you'd need to study something YOU wrote.
 

rc4ch

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Oct 18, 2005
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1. Would it be a good idea to take a binder consisting of copies of certificates and awards, with addition to letters of recommendation from volunteer organizations for proof?

2. I have read that it is recommended to take a portfolio or folder to an interview. What do people put in the this? Just loose leaf paper to take notes on during the interview? (Maybe a copy of a resume to pass out ?)

3. How many questions does a student usually ask?

4. I am worried about how to conclude the interview. How does one thank the interviewers the right way?
I never brought a binder or folder or paper to any of my interviews. Most people I've seen at interviews did not.

Ask 3 or 4 questions or as many as you'd like.

Say: thank you for having me and thank you for your time.

Just be yourself and relax. And stop worrying.
 

BioENG 215

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Feb 7, 2009
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1. Would it be a good idea to take a binder consisting of copies of certificates and awards, with addition to letters of recommendation from volunteer organizations for proof?

2. I have read that it is recommended to take a portfolio or folder to an interview. What do people put in the this? Just loose leaf paper to take notes on during the interview? (Maybe a copy of a resume to pass out ?)

3. How many questions does a student usually ask?

4. I am worried about how to conclude the interview. How does one thank the interviewers the right way?

1. There's no need to take any certs or awards. They already know you're qualified. Now they want to determine if you would be a good "fit" for the school as far as personality is concerned.

2. Take a portfolio. It allows you to look professional and have the ability to scribble a note. It don't recommend taking any notes during the interview as it distracts from the interview flow. You want to have a nice flow of communication between the interviewing committee and yourself.

3. Ask as many questions as you'd like. It's best to find out as much as you can about the school before making the four year commitment. However, avoid asking questions which could easily be answered by visiting the schools website. If you are really interested in the answer, it will add a great amount of energy to the conversation.

4. Thank the interviewer by giving them a 'firm' handshake (indicates confidence) and say "Thank you for providing me with the opportunity to visit your school and taking the time to personally sit with me..... blah blah blah. Make sure you get the interviewers contact information to write a formal thank you letter/email.

Note: I've interviewed many candidates for engineering positions and it's pretty much the same. The resume (Primary/Secondary App) tells us the candidates qualifications. The face to face interview allows us to dig a little bit deeper into the candidates experience and to determine if they're a good fit for our group. After all of the interviews are conducted, we meet to discuss the candidates and choose the one which best fits the need of the open position.

Hope this helps!
 

droogdoc

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Jul 12, 2009
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I am going to bring a portfolio with a pad of paper in it and a copy of the file sent to them by AACOMAS. That's it. It's not that I need to "study" it but it couldnt be a bad thing to have.

Personally, I look at this like the most important interview of your life thus far. Also, you never go into an interview, especially a very important one, without something to write on. EVen though, as posted above, you really wont be writing anything during the interview.
 

soriandra

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4. Thank the interviewer by giving them a 'firm' handshake (indicates confidence) and say "Thank you for providing me with the opportunity to visit your school and taking the time to personally sit with me..... blah blah blah. Make sure you get the interviewers contact information to write a formal thank you letter/email.

Hope this helps!
What do I do if there's a commitee, like 3 or 4 professors? I can't possibly ask all of them to exchange emails with me, can I?

I am going to bring a portfolio with a pad of paper in it and a copy of the file sent to them by AACOMAS. That's it. It's not that I need to "study" it but it couldnt be a bad thing to have.

Personally, I look at this like the most important interview of your life thus far. Also, you never go into an interview, especially a very important one, without something to write on. EVen though, as posted above, you really wont be writing anything during the interview.
So basically just bring something so you're not empty handed but never use it? Can't think of a good time to take notes anyway, unless you wanna walk and write and then during the actual interview you shouldn't so...:confused:

I'm nervous...
 
May 22, 2009
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Instead of exchanging emails, I plan on just remembering their names at the beginning of the interview and find out their address/office number afterward. Although, if their names were anything like dr. alexyukinski, dr. chupakrov, and dr. yo****aka ishii, i don't think I could remember them.