M

mitrieD

I'm about to start writing my personal statement but I'm a little worried. I've read other 'successful' personal statements for those that applied to medical school. The thing is, my personal statement doesn't have some amazing or super interesting story.... but it goes into genuine and logical detail in why I for sure want to become a podiatrist over any other career. Will this hurt my chances? How important is the personal statement compared to the rest of the application?
 

dorsiflexor

2+ Year Member
Jan 10, 2016
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Resident [Any Field]
I'm about to start writing my personal statement but I'm a little worried. I've read other 'successful' personal statements for those that applied to medical school. The thing is, my personal statement doesn't have some amazing or super interesting story.... but it goes into genuine and logical detail in why I for sure want to become a podiatrist over any other career. Will this hurt my chances? How important is the personal statement compared to the rest of the application?
Being honest >>>>> bull****ting some story that you think sounds good.

Your personal statement is meant for exactly what you described: explaining why podiatry and why you.

Mine wasn't some cool story. I explained my dream to be in healthcare, my shadowing experience of all different specialties and how I initially avoided podiatry because I have family members that are podiatrists and I didn't want to follow them (wanted to make my own path/way or whatever). But after realizing no other specialty really felt right I decided to shadow a pod. Ended up sticking around for a while because I loved it so he hired me as an MA and I worked there for over a year while applying and interviewing.

In the end be honest. Your interviewers will ask about it and they can see through the bull****.
 
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heybrother

7+ Year Member
Oct 17, 2011
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Podiatrist
What he said. I was a student interviewer during my 3rd year. Most of the essays were not impressive. I personally appreciate an honest story with smooth transitions (I'd like to follow your thought process from paragraph to paragraph) that demonstrates an true interest (dear lord please have shadowed) and an honest understanding of the profession (what we actually do for people and not what you imagine or want us to be). We don't walk on water and I don't think you do either. Go easy on the cliches. Important - if English is not your first language - have a friend proof read it.

That said - I don't particularly think there is a lot of weight given to the essay. As a student I didn't see grades or MCAT so all I had to go on was your interview and personality, but in theory I had a vote.

At DMU you are asked a series of questions. My personal experience is that people who have had more life experiences tended to have more to share. If you'd been challenged more, volunteered, or held a leadership experience then you were more likely to have something to say about success and failure.

I personally feel a lot of people who interview didn't really understand the questions. Each of the pre-written questions, in my opinion, was meant to explore your values, integrity, and depth as a person. Yes, you should answer the question, but take a moment to ask yourself "what are they really asking me". Show us some insight into yourself as a person.
 
OP
M

mitrieD

What he said. I was a student interviewer during my 3rd year. Most of the essays were not impressive. I personally appreciate an honest story with smooth transitions (I'd like to follow your thought process from paragraph to paragraph) that demonstrates an true interest (dear lord please have shadowed) and an honest understanding of the profession (what we actually do for people and not what you imagine or want us to be). We don't walk on water and I don't think you do either. Go easy on the cliches. Important - if English is not your first language - have a friend proof read it.

That said - I don't particularly think there is a lot of weight given to the essay. As a student I didn't see grades or MCAT so all I had to go on was your interview and personality, but in theory I had a vote.

At DMU you are asked a series of questions. My personal experience is that people who have had more life experiences tended to have more to share. If you'd been challenged more, volunteered, or held a leadership experience then you were more likely to have something to say about success and failure.

I personally feel a lot of people who interview didn't really understand the questions. Each of the pre-written questions, in my opinion, was meant to explore your values, integrity, and depth as a person. Yes, you should answer the question, but take a moment to ask yourself "what are they really asking me". Show us some insight into yourself as a person.

Wait, you actually had applicants that didn't shadow any podiatrists?

And yes my main concern is that my essay will be filled with cliche's and typical concepts you'd expect in a personal statement because I chose this career based on me looking around and finding the right career path for me rather than going on some magical journey or going through some traumatic experience that made me want to become a doctor...