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I've just started thinking about this and was wondering if anyone had some insight. Are there any specialties that tend to be more travel-friendly (work-related travel), or allow you to even practice abroad for some amount of time?
 

LRAccord624

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Infectious Disease, especially if you decide to do any research, will be one specialty that offers a lot of travel. I know an ID doc who specializes in tropical disease and travels to south america and Africa alot. He was also in the military for a number of years and goes to the middle east regularly.
 

justdoit31

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General/Trauma Surgery, Family/Internal, or Pediatrics are always good... also several organizations look for anesthesiologist to come and help during surgeries (Operation Smile type stuff). What physicians have told me is that if you specialize too much (say cardiology, oncology, resp) you can't do as much.

One oncologist said "so what if I can diagnose them with a cancer I can't treat it" (refering to trips to Central America) but she is able to listen for basic things, it's just she doesn't remember every little thing from medical school general rotations and she doesn't see those issues anymore.
 

LizzyM

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Add Emergency Medicine-- particularly in areas with violence.
 

tkim

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I've just started thinking about this and was wondering if anyone had some insight. Are there any specialties that tend to be more travel-friendly (work-related travel), or allow you to even practice abroad for some amount of time?
You need to differentiate between medical missions, where you either work for free or minimal money - like Doctors Without Borders, and true, move to another country and practice for money.

Doing the first, pretty easy, as they grant privileges for visiting missions.

Relocating and practicing for money, much harder. Licensing requirement and language issues make it a country-to-country issue. There is no such thing as an internationally recognized medical degree, US MD or otherwise.
 

Morsetlis

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Surgical specialties are in high demand. However, if you know how to manage DM, OA, HTN, and STD's, that's probably what most people need.
 

link2swim06

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I read it on here....

Cruise ships hire EM docs to work on them
I hear you get paid peanuts and live in a closet if you work on a cruise ship. I read something awhile back, most cruise ships have foreign docs who will work for less anyways.
 

FluffyRabbit

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boaz

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There was an EM doc on the news (I forget his name) who went to Haiti and did amputations under fallen down buildings and massive slabs of concrete.
 

CUBR

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But it's basically vacation all year.
It's not really vacation when you're working all the time. And all you see is puking from sea sickness and couple heart attacks a year. In which case you try to keep them alive until the coast guard can reach you.
 
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Have you ever considered radiology? More specifically teleradiology.

As long as you have high quality monitors and high speed internet connection you can work from virtually anywhere. It might even be considered an advantage because of time differences your working day could be the middle of the night back in North America.

-Tyler
 

Bernoull

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I've just started thinking about this and was wondering if anyone had some insight. Are there any specialties that tend to be more travel-friendly (work-related travel), or allow you to even practice abroad for some amount of time?

Public health/Epidemiology.. think WHO, you travel to death.

I have a family member who just wrapped up 20yrs at WHO and routinely travelled from Egypt to Iraq, US to Kazahkstan, Tanzania to Myanmar and many countries in between..