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Sports Medicine

Discussion in 'Family Medicine' started by freddydpt, May 3, 2004.

  1. freddydpt

    Physician 10+ Year Member

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    Hi,

    I'll be an entering 1st year at GW Med and I'm finishing up my doctor of physical therapy degree this year. I realize I have a ton of time but I wanted to explore how competitive it is to get a Sports Fellowship after a FP residency. Would anyone happen to know that? Also, would the DPT degree help in the applicant pool? Also, does anyone know the salary difference before and after a sports fellowship.

    Thanks so much!
    Fred
     
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  3. DocWagner

    DocWagner Senior Member
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    While I am not a FP resident...I can offer alot of information.

    First and foremost, you are apprently are entering medical school? That is a great idea, as I was a PT prior to medical school, and it is always nice to see allied health professions entering medicine.

    Now, as for Sports Medicine after residency, yes it is quite competitive. You can actually go the IM, FP, PM&R, or EM route and of course Orthopedic Surgery.
    The fellowships are 1-2 years in length. Because of the limited number of fellowships, it is very competitive.
    Wage of course depends on the primary residency training, as relatively few decide to practice ONLY sportsmedicine. Myself, I will choose to practice only part time in sports medicine as EM does pay considerably better as a starting salary.
    http://www.amssm.org/Fellow.html

    The above site should give you some nice information.
     
  4. freddydpt

    Physician 10+ Year Member

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    Hi DocWagner,

    Thanks for your reply. It was very helpful. What would be some advice be to a fellow PT entering medical school? What motivated you to go to medical school?

    Fred
     
  5. DocWagner

    DocWagner Senior Member
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    My advice...be prepared to enter the majors. As many say, "slow and steady wins the race", so do not expect to be "the best", do not expect "to be #1". You will find yourself behind in certain areas and ahead in other areas. Just survive and maintain a social life as best as you can.

    I chose medical school after 3 years of PT outpatient practice because PT no longer challenged me. I wanted to 1. make life and death decisions 2. face the challenge of medical school 3. get out of the nonsense political world of PT (I found PT to be 50% politics and 50% patient practice, DPT vs PT debates and direct access debates...all of which really meant zero as licensure requirments state to state varied and were less than stringent...seemed to form a double standard of "education up front, but after you graduated you could slide").

    Medical school was fantastic...you will be humbled and you will have a greater respect for Doctors, Nurses, EMT's, and of course Residents. It is a WHOLE new level.
     
  6. kmacPTATC

    kmacPTATC Junior Member
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    DocWagner,

    Are you using any of your techniques to help patients? I bet you get to see alot of acute backs in the ER. I will be attending an allopathic school this fall, but I want to continue to work on improving my manual therapy skills, your thoughts?
     
  7. DocWagner

    DocWagner Senior Member
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    Well as a DO, many of my skills for NON EMERGENT patients (back pain/neck pain) fall into these categories:

    1. Manipulation vs nonmanipulation
    2. Stretches
    3. Education
    4. Medical treatment

    Most often my PT skills are seen with peripheral joint exams.

    I can say that being a PT made being a DO alot easier...today, I can't tell which is more influential.
    Since I am in an allopathic residency, many of the other residents note a difference in the way I do an exam(perhaps more hands on)...but it is attributed to being a DO.
    Personally i think being a PT gave my hands "practice" touching patients and really having confidence in my hands...something MD's rarely have (besides orthopedic surgeons or Rheumatologists)


    Being a PT has a great route towards being
    1. Orthopedic surgery
    2. PM&R
    3. FP
    4. some derivation with sports medicine

    It is not a natural progression to EM...I just wanted AWAY from chronic pain patients. Good Lord, I still see too many fibromyalgia patients as it is!!!
     
  8. kmacPTATC

    kmacPTATC Junior Member
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    :thumbup: Thanks for the advice.
     

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