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St. John's University 7 Year DPM Program (NYCPM)

Discussion in 'Pre-Podiatry Students' started by smsc2009, Mar 24, 2007.

  1. smsc2009

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    Hi,
    I am currently a sophmore in high school. I know that I want to work in field of medicine, however I am not sure which field yet. I have several MD and DDS in my family, but nobody is a DPM. I have been to the Podiatrist many times, he is probably one of from favorite doctors to go visit. I have talked with him about a career in Podiatry and he has only encourged it. I really like NYC and understand that combined with St. John's University NYCPM has a 7 year program. If I choose to go DPM I would like to complete a residency in Sports Medicine. I hope to practice in either NY, NJ, PA, or CA. I am curious to know about this 7 year program I understand you start right out of high school, correct? I like the fact that I would be guaranteed a spot in NYCPM. My main question is how competitive is admission? Is the program only opened to people who are in AP's and have 3.8+ GPA? Would you recommend this path? Anything else you can tell me about the program I would appreciate,
    Thanks
     
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  3. jonwill

    jonwill Podiatrist
    Podiatrist Moderator Emeritus

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    Wow, I've actually never heard of this before. I really should get out more! Maybe one of our NYCPM posters can help you out.
     
  4. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member
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    there are currently no residencies in sports medicine. All residencies are currently surgical in nature (PM&S 36 and PM&S 24). you can find more info on the differences in these residencies by going to www.apmsa.org . Or doing a search on SDN.

    About the St. Johns 7 year program...

    The only 7 year programs that I am aware of are the articulation agreements between NYCPM and several colleges thru out the US. But these programs do not start from the 1st day of college. The college student applies to NYCPM in the 2nd or 3rd year of college and once accepted begins NYCPM as the 4th year of college/1st year of NYCPM and gets a diploma from college after successful completion of the 1st year of pod school. Maybe I am wrong and St. Johns has a program that starts right as you enter college. You'll have to call the admissions department at NYCPM and speak to Lisa Lee for more info 212-410-8032.

    I do not know if anything is garunteed.

    The advice I would give to you on any 7 year deal is....

    Be careful what you enter into that will direct your life for the next 7 years. The podiatry profession has been in transition for the past several/many years and continues to change. How can you know if the school you want to go to today will still be the right school for you in 3 years. Be very careful in making this decision. You must do plenty of research on the profession and the colleges before jumping into this.

    Best of luck. Feel free to PM me with specific questions about NYCPM.
     
  5. smsc2009

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    Thank you for the informational post. I am intrested in three schools if I choose Podiatry, NYCPM, Temple, and Western. I understand Western will not be open until 2009, but I wont be applying til about 2013 anyway. This is what I have found from the St. John's website,

    Pre-Podiatry (a seven-year, B.S.-D.P.M. degree in affiliation with the New York College of Podiatric Medicine) (http://www.stjohns.edu/admission/programs.sju)

    One question about Western, do you guys think it would be bad to attend because it will be so new?

    Last thing, I understand that the residencies are only surgical, however is there a Sports Medicine fellowship after the residency? What other fellowships are offered? I did a search, and even looked at the site provided, I still don't fully understand the difference between PM&S 36 and PM&S 24. Hopefully someone can explain,
    Thanks again
     
  6. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    There are risks and benefits with any new school. One of those would be that they do not gain accreditation. There are many people who do not agree with opening another school; so it maybe scrutinized a lot more than AZPod or other schools. I can see alumni, faculty, and students of CCPM being a major road block for final approval.

    Also, many of the schools have early entrance programs. If you contact the other schools they may also work with your undergrad to get your B.S. also.
     
  7. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member
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    This website does not differentiate between an articulation agreement or a true BS/DPM program. Definitely call and ask questions.

    About the residencies: 24 is 2 years and for forefoot mostly - bunions and hammer toes. 36 is three years and for forefoot and rearfoot/ankle reconstructive and trauma.

    There are fellowships mostly in wound care, some in vascular, few in ortho foot and ankle, AO in germany, switzerland and austria, and maybe in sports med but you have to really search for sports med if any are left.
     
  8. smsc2009

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    So 36 would add alot more to do in a practice, correct?
    Thanks
     
  9. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    Yes and no. Many pods don't do much in the RF and ankle b/c it can be very demanding, and the outcomes at times are not as great. Bunion surgeries and hammertoes can really pay the bills b/c patients usually can see the results.
     
  10. cool_vkb

    cool_vkb Member

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    What do you mean by demanding? I didnt understood that. and i thought RF surgeries pays very well!
     
  11. krabmas

    krabmas Senior Member
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    There is this thing called the global period. Insurance companies re-imburse for the surgical procedure then for the next 90 days (typical time frame) what ever you do for the patient (mostly all things, not x-rays) is not re-imbursed. The weekly or bi-monthly appointments that you have with the patient are all included in the re-imburdement for the actual procedure.

    The reason that rearfoot stuff is more demanding is that it is usually a surgery performed due to trauma, charcot, pediatric flatfoot, neuromuscular conditions... many things that are not easily delt with. The joints that are "messed" with for rearfoot and ankle procedures are high demand for gait. After trauma or fixing a very deformed foot there is very high risk for arthritis due to joint surfaces not alligning 100% properly. The patients tend to have continued pain and become patients for life. Pediatric patients can sue until they are 18 and in some states a few years past their 18th birthday, making it very risky to do surgery on kids if you are not proficient.

    I hope this helps a little to clarify.
     
  12. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    :thumbup:

    And unfortunately if their co-morbidities don't add to the issues then noncompliance can.
     
  13. KHep

    KHep Senior Member

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    I know that Scholl offers the BS degree to students who don't already have one, after successfully completing the first year of pod school. You have to request it (and pay a small fee) and then it is granted at the end of year 2.

    Don't most pod schools only require 90 hrs? There are even a few md schools that will admit students with 90 hrs...not that this is in the best interest of the majority of applicants.

    There are several md schools that have 6-8 yr programs right out of h.s. Now is the time to look at them because you have to apply at the beginning of your senior year. Some guarantee entrance to med school, others are based on college GPA and MCAT...some you don't even have to take MCAT. Others want you to take MCAT for their data, but don't have a required score for entrance. I think that it is a shame that more HS students don't know of these programs because it seems as if there aren't tons of people applying to these programs...maybe I'm wrong; I don't know.

    If you are solely interested in Sports Med, then md/do is the route for you. It would be very tough to have a pod practice that only concentrates on sports med. Try to find someone in your area to shadow, then you'll have a better idea of which fits your ideal lifestyle. Good Luck!!!:luck:
     
  14. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    Not just a few MD programs. I would dare to say all programs have some sort of early entrance program (i.e. 90 credit hours), but some of them are very hard to gain acceptance through.

    Does Scholl have certain requirements (i.e. History, Arts, ect) or can anyone get the B.S.?
     
  15. KHep

    KHep Senior Member

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    Not all have early acceptance. My info is old, but in 2005-2006 MSAR, there were 48 schools (out of about 130 md schools) that offer a combined BS/MD. And yes, most are difficult to get into; it is med school after all.

    Scholl does have specific requirements for the BS; there are a number of humanities and math requirements. If anyone wants the information, it's on Scholl's website in their student handbook.
     
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  17. KHep

    KHep Senior Member

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    And as far as shaving total time off of schooling, only 20 of those 48 offered the BS/MD in less than 8 years. And 5 of those schools will let you do it in 6-7 years:eek:
     
  18. KHep

    KHep Senior Member

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    And isn't it crazy to think that there are doctors running around out there without an undergrad degree? DPMs, ODs, DCs, DDSs....:eek:

    The other nice thing about some of these early entrance programs is that they don't all have application fees, nor do they have seat deposits. So, if you are 17 and know with certainty that you want to got to med school, this seems like an awesome way to go about it.

    Some of these schools only get about 30 applicants! Like East Tennessee State had 20 applicants in 2004, they interviewed all 20 and 12 matriculated! Of course, the other end of it was Drexel which had 1200+ apps, interviewed 49, 16 entrants. Most are in the 150-200 range for applicants though.
     
  19. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    I'm not talking about getting a BS/MD, I'm talking about early entrance only. You do the pre-reqs and have a total of 90 credit hours. Personally, I think a BS/BA is the modern high school diploma. It does not carry the prestige it once did.
     
  20. KHep

    KHep Senior Member

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    Those are the early acceptance programs. Most schools require a BA or BS. And I think most people agree that EVERYONE has a BA or BS these days.
     
  21. Dr_Feelgood

    Dr_Feelgood Guest

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    Maybe it was just a perfect storm. Creighton U and U of Nebraska Medical Center are the two programs I applied to, and they both only require 90 credits for admission.

    http://www2.creighton.edu/medschool/medicine/officeofmedicaladmissions/requirements/index.php

    http://www.unmc.edu/dept/com/index.cfm?L1_ID=-1&L2_ID=-1&L3_ID=6&CONREF=3
     
  22. KHep

    KHep Senior Member

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    OK so you are talking about programs to which you apply during your Jr year of college. I was referring to the ones that require you to apply during HS and then you have an agreement to matriculate to their MD school upon the completion of either 90 hrs or a undergrad degree. I do however think, that there are more MD schools that require an undergrad degree than don't. Maybe I'm mistaken.
     

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