Feb 5, 2013
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0
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Hi! I am applying for IM categorical match 2013 and am really interested in heme/onc in the future.

I was pretty impressed by the affiliation SLR has with MSKCC-- 4-5 months of rotation with ample opportunities for research and one SLR resident becoming a chief resident at MSKCC every year.

My question: does this really help in getting a reputed fellowship in the future? Or should I rank university programs (Upstate, UMass, Louisville) above SLR?

Thanks a lot!!
 

ROBINHO

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Dec 27, 2004
407
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Resident [Any Field]
The best indicator is those who have matched from SLR into heme onc...where have they gone to?
 
OP
T
Feb 5, 2013
8
0
Status
The best indicator is those who have matched from SLR into heme onc...where have they gone to?
Thats obvious, but one SLR resident being chosen as a chief resident at MSKCC is brand new! It starts from July 2013 with a PGY3.

Seeing their fellowships now, its just above average except for July 2010 when it was exceptional (1 MSKCC, 1 MD Anderson, 1 Fox Chase, 1 Emory, 1 NYU, 1 IU).
 
Jan 26, 2011
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Resident [Any Field]
SLR does give you ample opportunity to rotate and MSKCC, and there is going to be a chief since NYU pulled out there.

In most years, MSKCC takes 0-1 SLR residents on as fellows. Its a good program, and probably your best shot of getting into MSKCC of programs in that tier. A stronger but not top tier university program probably gives you as good a shot, but probably not better.
 
OP
T
Feb 5, 2013
8
0
Status
SLR does give you ample opportunity to rotate and MSKCC, and there is going to be a chief since NYU pulled out there.

In most years, MSKCC takes 0-1 SLR residents on as fellows. Its a good program, and probably your best shot of getting into MSKCC of programs in that tier. A stronger but not top tier university program probably gives you as good a shot, but probably not better.
Thanks, that was helpful!
 
8

868853

I am a recent grad of SLR's IM program. It is a strong program on the rise and has gotten a lot better each year since Mount Sinai acquired the 2 hospitals. The Sloan experience is a great opportunity to see how Heme/Onc functions in the best cancer center in the world and even though I didn't go into Heme/Onc it was one of the top rotations I participated in as a resident. We match as well as any other program in our tier into Heme/Onc and there is always a sky high ceiling for the people who are motivated enough, although that can be said of most programs.

The location is superb as well. Residents live in subsidized housing across the street from Roosevelt/West Hospital. It's a big class but they do a great job of recruiting diverse residents with a pretty good mix of US MD/DO, and then IMGs from all around the world (Central America, South America, Europe, and Asia are all well-represented every year).

As New York City residencies go the hours are reasonable. Residents don't work more than 16 hours straight, and that itself is rare. Scut work is minimal and is basically non-existent now. One of the big complaints people used to have was having to draw their own labs on occasion, but now they're done entirely by nurses/phlebotomists. The salaries are among the best in the city (higher than Mount Sinai Hospital's residents are paid), and the benefits are incredible, I didn't know they made health insurance policies as good as SLR's, everyone in your family is covered at no additional cost and it covers everything. Dental and vision are also included. Along with a life insurance policy for something like $100-150K at no cost to the resident. Residents get Seamless lunch delivered on day shifts Monday - Friday and about $500 annually to cover non-Seamless shifts (night float, weekends). Schedule is X+Y (6+2) and residents are exposed to a strong outpatient experience at Ryan Center clinics around New York. The patient population is among the most diverse you'll find anywhere in the country drawing from Harlem, the Bronx, the Upper West Side, and Midtown.

The two hospitals are undergoing renovations and a switch to Epic EMR is on the horizon, although it has been for the last year or so.

I highly recommend this program. The fellowship match has gradually improved over the last few years with a very strong one last year. I am confident it will keep getting better under the guidance of Mount Sinai.
 

notcool

5+ Year Member
Jan 29, 2014
37
18
I am a recent grad of SLR's IM program. It is a strong program on the rise and has gotten a lot better each year since Mount Sinai acquired the 2 hospitals. The Sloan experience is a great opportunity to see how Heme/Onc functions in the best cancer center in the world and even though I didn't go into Heme/Onc it was one of the top rotations I participated in as a resident. We match as well as any other program in our tier into Heme/Onc and there is always a sky high ceiling for the people who are motivated enough, although that can be said of most programs.

The location is superb as well. Residents live in subsidized housing across the street from Roosevelt/West Hospital. It's a big class but they do a great job of recruiting diverse residents with a pretty good mix of US MD/DO, and then IMGs from all around the world (Central America, South America, Europe, and Asia are all well-represented every year).

As New York City residencies go the hours are reasonable. Residents don't work more than 16 hours straight, and that itself is rare. Scut work is minimal and is basically non-existent now. One of the big complaints people used to have was having to draw their own labs on occasion, but now they're done entirely by nurses/phlebotomists. The salaries are among the best in the city (higher than Mount Sinai Hospital's residents are paid), and the benefits are incredible, I didn't know they made health insurance policies as good as SLR's, everyone in your family is covered at no additional cost and it covers everything. Dental and vision are also included. Along with a life insurance policy for something like $100-150K at no cost to the resident. Residents get Seamless lunch delivered on day shifts Monday - Friday and about $500 annually to cover non-Seamless shifts (night float, weekends). Schedule is X+Y (6+2) and residents are exposed to a strong outpatient experience at Ryan Center clinics around New York. The patient population is among the most diverse you'll find anywhere in the country drawing from Harlem, the Bronx, the Upper West Side, and Midtown.

The two hospitals are undergoing renovations and a switch to Epic EMR is on the horizon, although it has been for the last year or so.

I highly recommend this program. The fellowship match has gradually improved over the last few years with a very strong one last year. I am confident it will keep getting better under the guidance of Mount Sinai.
I saw the fellowship match list from 2012-2015 on SLR's website. Any idea what it looks like for Heme/Onc for 2016+? Thanks.