EtherBunny

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Quick question...

I recently transitioned into a group practice of pain physicians. As a new doctor in the practice, I had assumed that roughly half of my insurance premiums for my family would be covered by the practice. When I signed up for the benefits yesterday, it seemed like I was covering the entire premium, which is roughly $1300/mo for a family of four.

Is this the norm for private practice? I was employed by a hospital before and my health insurance premiums were a fraction of the cost, presumably because the hospital was heavily subsidizing them.
 

DOctorJay

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Yes. At each of the private practices I interviewed at not a single one provided health insurance for the physicians. They did for their regular staff.

Unfortunately I think this is the norm although I know of at least one doc on here who helps out his employed physicians.


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lobelsteve

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Some one can chime in on # employees and mandatory. Do not think if they offer to employees they do not offer to you is legal. If you are an employee. 1099 is on your own.
 

Ducttape

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you arent an employed physician. you are in private practice, right? i would naturally assume that you would have to pay for all of your "benefits". does make sense for the group practice to take money from your hard work, only to pay you back via benefits? its your money...


benefits (and lack there of) was the major deciding factor on my choosing on a hospital employed position as opposed to private practice.


and steve, shouldnt you be lecturing some group right now?
 

willabeast

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you arent an employed physician. you are in private practice, right? i would naturally assume that you would have to pay for all of your "benefits". does make sense for the group practice to take money from your hard work, only to pay you back via benefits? its your money...


benefits (and lack there of) was the major deciding factor on my choosing on a hospital employed position as opposed to private practice.


and steve, shouldnt you be lecturing some group right now?
seems to me the only person who can accurately predict if it is better to get income vs health benefits is your accountant. that is what accountants are for. one nice thing about $$ is that you can pick whatever insurance or group you wish. i have life time insurance benefits BUT when i turn 65 i have to live in only a few states to take advantage of it. so i would take a hit living in Idaho or New Zealand for example. Kauai does not work either. limits me a little.
 

Ducttape

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for old guys like me, i dont need an accountant to tell me that getting disability insurance through an employer is better than not being able to get any at all due to age, etc.

likewise, being able to get life insurance that is not exhorbitant is better than going without.
 

olafa

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For health insurance for the employee, either partial coverage or full and with family coverage up to employee seems reasonable.
Malpractice also covered

Disability and other insuances up to the individual employee.
 

bedrock

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Paying a significant proportion of health care benefits is still expected in most private practices.

They should pay at least a third if not half your insurance premium.

Agree with Steve that offering insurance to employees and not to you is illegal in most states. Also, it's still the norm to expect some insurance coverage, so them just transferring that cost to your salary is a bait and switch.
 
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Ducttape

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um... in private practice, are you (etherbunny) salaried?
Agree with Steve that offering insurance to employees and not to you is illegal in most states. Also, it's still the norm to expect some insurance coverage, so them just transferring that cost to your salary is a bait and switch.
if you are PP and "eat what you kill", how does the practice get money to pay for your health insurance?

ive been told all along that employed doctor's salaries are almost always lower because the employer pays for benefits. if one is private practice in a group, does that automatically mean "salaried"?