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Stats?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by Hawkeye, Dec 11, 1999.

  1. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Senior Member

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    What stats would one need to be considered a "competitive applicant" for an osteopathic school?? I have seen the averages on the U.S. News Report, but do these generally result acceptance?? Thanks in advance.

    Go Hawkeyes
     
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  3. rhillstr

    rhillstr Senior Member

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    I think the averages are very accurate, yet meaningless. These are averages remember, not thresholds. Thus if the average GPA was 3.5, someone with a 4.0 and someone with a 3.0 could have matriculated. Or....
    Someone with a 3.4 and a 3.6! You'll never really know. I had a 3.2 overall GPA but a 33 MCAT. That means I push one up and push one down wherever I would attend. There is grade inflation to consider and major as well. So, while the math is very accurate, it is truly devoid of utility.
    RH
    CCOM '04
     
  4. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    Hawkeye,

    Just remember that if the average is higher say 3.8 then the majority of their class is in that general area. True they'll be people with lower scores than that, but the majority of the students would be on the higher end thereby pushing up the avg. Honestly, if you have basically a 3.5 (give or take) and an avg MCAT of around 25 (give or take) and a bounty of volunteer/extracurricular experiences etc... Then your in. All you have to do is give a decent interview. However, if your lower than that stated above in any one category then it is essential that you excel in the others to help balance things out.

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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004
     
  5. Nav

    Nav Member

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    I don't think that the averages mean anything. It is mostly luck.
    Some schools which have a lower admissions averages might reject you outright while another with a higher average might give you an early interview. Kind of strange.
     
  6. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    It's all relative Nav. Every situation is unique. That's why it's best to apply to several schools. However, like I said if you've got those stats I mentioned earlier, then you've got a pretty solid chance.

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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004
     
  7. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Senior Member

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    DocGibby:

    You mentioned in an earlier post that an average MCAT was a 25. What is considered to be high and low? I have yet to take the MCAT being only a sophomore, but have begun to think about it. Also what test do you feel is better to take (August or April)? Any pros/cons to either? Thanks in advance!

    Go Hawkeyes
     
  8. mt

    mt Member

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    Hawkeye,

    For your own sanity take the April MCAT if you have finished the prerequisites and are prepared for the exam. Taking the April MCAT allows you to apply early and interview early if possible. Also, some with lower stats have found that their early second time apps have helped them to secure interviews without changing anything about their apps except for earlier application submission. Taking the August MCAT does not preclude you from getting an interview or obtaining a spot but you are dealing with less openings in the class in which to compete. Also, you will not be waiting for 2 months watching others get interviews while you are anxiously awaiting your scores and later interview invites. Good luck and study hard.
     
  9. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Senior Member

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    mt:

    I will not have completely finished physics. I plan on taking it next year first and second semester of my junior year. Do you think that I will be alright only having 1.5 semesters of physics or will this not be to my benefit? Thanks a million for the advice.

    Go Hawkeyes
     
  10. larryj

    larryj Member

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    Hawkeye-
    You will be fine with 1.5 semesters of Physics when you take MCAT. I took it after only one semester of physics. First semester covers nearly everything. Get a good review book and teach yourself the little bit about currents/magnets/and optics which are not covered in physics I.

    BTW- what happened in Ames saturday night? Hawks looked terrible!
     
  11. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Senior Member

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    larryj:

    I couldn't agree with you more, the Hawks came out and looked really flat. It has been a terrible year for the Hawks, first the football game and now this. Oh well...to steal a page out of the ISU handbook "There is always next year." Thanks for the advice.

    Go Hawkeyes
     
  12. mt

    mt Member

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    Hawkeye,

    I agree with larryJ that the MCAT can be done with 1.5 years of physics. But, the topics he listed in his post: currents, magnets, and optics are physics 2 topics and from my experience are huge. IF you can take a lighter load during your spring semester to study and take a review class do it. The Princeton Review is money well spent. If you are taking a full load you will not get the full benefit of the review class because you will not do the material properly. There is just not enough time. Make sure you schedule classes accordingly and lighten the load during MCAT semester. Making up some extra credits during the summer is alot better than having to study for the MCAT twice. Good luck.
     
  13. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    Hawkeye,

    Basically, you want to maintain at least an eight in all three categories (best scenario). You can get in with less (not much)but obviously the lower the scores the lower your chances. Anyway, forget about all that. You haven't even taken the test yet. You should be more concerned with doing the best possible (not the bare minimum). If you can manage to pull off a double digit or two it's all the better.

    Best test taking time? Here's my story. I took it in April of my Junior year (the typical time you take it). I got one low score, a 6. Instead of applying anyway (1st mistake) I waited and took the August test (brought up the 6). You recieve your scores around late October. Then I screwed around with AACOMAS packet until late November (2nd mistake). Long story short, I didn't get in. MSUCOM advised me to apply early June (start of app cycle). I did and I got in.

    My advice:

    1)If your a procrastinator(like me) and you have the resourses take a Kaplan or Princeton Review course (or whomever else). It forces you to study.

    2)If you feel sufficiently prepared can get enough study time etc.. Take the test in August of at the start of your junior year. The reason is that if you can take the test in august (only if your ready!!!) then you'll have another opportunity the following April to retake the test if necessary and still get the app out early June. Of course it's always best to take the test once and do your best.

    3)If your not ready in August, then take it in April. Do your best and get that app out ASAP (early june). If you did poorly, send it in anyway and take it again in August. Most schools will simply put your file on hold until the new scores arrive. Besides you never know. Despite a low score you just might have what they're looking for. In anycase by sending in your app you'll save valuable time as opposed to waiting till Nov to get things started.

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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004
     
  14. For those of you that are familiar with the credentials required of the interviewees at NYCOM: Is it common for students with my stats (cGPA=3.67, sGPA=3.46, MCAT=8v,10p,9b,Q) to be rejected after an interview there? NYCOM interviews approximately 600 applicants per application year and accepts roughly 300. What caused the remaining 300 interviewees to be rejected? Any experienced input concerning my chances for admission and grades and MCAT of the entering class at NYCOM would be greatly appreciated. [​IMG]
     
  15. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    Vegeta,

    Have you already been rejected? Have you been interviewed yet? Are you a New York resident? Your post isn't clear. I'm pretty sure that NYCOM is one of those schools like MSUCOM which is partial to in-state residents. As far as the other 300. I haven't seen their applications so I couldn't tell you. There could be a multitude of reasons that 300 people were rejected. For one thing, not everybody applying to med school has "stellar" scores. As much as the Admissions committee's would love to accept everyone, they've gotta draw the line somewhere. If you didn't get accepted, it's best to call the admissions office at NYCOM and ask them what you might need to improve on your application etc...

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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004

    [This message has been edited by DocGibby (edited 12-13-1999).]
     
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  17. No, I haven't been rejected and I'm interviewing at NYCOM shortly. My concern arises from the fact that I've been hearing that Osteopathic schools are favorable to non-traditional applicants--which I'm not. Being a borderline applicant, in my opinion, doesn't leave any room for further mediocrity so I was wondering if NYCOM applicants fell within a certain range of scores and grades (which the admissions committee views as reasonable for their school) and most of the upper half are offered a spot in the entering class.
     

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