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Steroid receptors in the cytosol?

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chaser0

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I just wanted to confirm that steroid receptors are not in the nucleus (i thought they were).

How do they act on the nucleus? Are they dragged there?

Thanks~
 

chaser0

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Thats what i thought but EK says verbatim

"Cortisol is a steroid. You should know that steroids diffuse through the membrane and bind to a receptor in the cytosol, where they are carried to the nucleus"

So... Thyroid and cortisol?
 

loveoforganic

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Weird, I don't think I ever learned that in phys, but it seems to be right with a quick google. I suppose so! I assume there are additional exceptions now, but I don't know what they are :(
 

Night Hawk

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I just wanted to confirm that steroid receptors are not in the nucleus (i thought they were).

How do they act on the nucleus? Are they dragged there?

Thanks~

You won't be asked to differentiate between the locations specifically. They'll say something like:
A. Plasma Membrane
B. Nuclear Membrane
C. Cytosol (Or they could say Nucelus)
D. Ribosome

The true answer is that they'rein both. Some receptors spend their entire "life" in the nucleus waiting to bind a steroid hormone, at which point they undergo a conformational change and act a transcription factors for X, Y, Z, etc.

The ones that "live" in the cytosol wait to be activated as well and their conformational change allows them to be transported to the nucleus where thay act as transcription factors as well.

I fould a lot of the EK Bio to be generalized so when in doubt I refered to whatevre text I didn't sell back, in this case my good ol' Molecular Cell Biology book...
 

ThirdEye

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The important thing to understand is that they move into the cell, which is obvious since steroids are lipids, whereas peptides act at the membrane.

Also know that steroids act slow and for long durations, and peptides are fast/short. Think cortisol shot vs. insulin shot.

If you understand these you're ready to move on.
 

Night Hawk

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the important thing to understand is that they move into the cell, which is obvious since steroids are lipids, whereas peptides act at the membrane.

Also know that steroids act slow and for long durations, and peptides are fast/short. Think cortisol shot vs. Insulin shot.

If you understand these you're ready to move on.

+1
 

loveoforganic

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I was just reviewing this material and thought I should recomment - I had misremembered. The common location for steroid receptors is cytosol (migrate to nucleus after binding hormone), but the location for TH receptors is the nucleus
 

Temperature101

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I was just reviewing this material and thought I should recomment - I had misremembered. The common location for steroid receptors is cytosol (migrate to nucleus after binding hormone), but the location for TH receptors is the nucleus
The operative word here is "common". Some steroid hormone receptors are located in nucleus...
 

pfaction

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I was just reviewing this material and thought I should recomment - I had misremembered. The common location for steroid receptors is cytosol (migrate to nucleus after binding hormone), but the location for TH receptors is the nucleus

This is what I learned. Especially for testosterone->DHT.
 

Temperature101

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I agree, but common doesn't mean insignificant (quite the opposite), particularly for the mcat
I agree. But I dont want other readers to think that steroid hormone receptors are ONLY located in the cytosol. That is why I pointed out the word 'common' in your post.
 
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