Streptococcus oligofermentans - The big hole in dentists' money pocket?

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coconutdental

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This newly discovered oral streptococci can out-do every virulent factor of S. mutans that makes it the most cariogenic oral bacteria!! Is the end of 'drill and fill' approaching?:confused:
 

Plopper

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so is this like a super bacteria...wouldn't that be good for business? more cavities??
 

appleonius

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basically S. mutans makes lactic acid as a byproduct. this acid causes caries. S. oligofermentans takes this lactic acid & converts it into peroxide...an inhibiting agent to S. mutans. luckily (or not), peroxide is used in dental whitening.
 

coconutdental

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basically S. mutans makes lactic acid as a byproduct. this acid causes caries. S. oligofermentans takes this lactic acid & converts it into peroxide...an inhibiting agent to S. mutans. luckily (or not), peroxide is used in dental whitening.

Interestingly, this effect is only specific to S. mutans. Other bacteria that a members of the oral normal flora were not significantly affected. All experiments so far were done in vitro. It will be interesting to see some animal studies.
 

Chesnok

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There also S. mitis and salivarius that are in the mouth. Also, I think that killing S.mutans would result in decreasing normal flora which I believe is not that good. Just think about what happens when you kill E. coli in your gut with antibiotics. I guess, it's called disbacteriosis and it takes time to regain E.coli back.
And yeah, E.coli + humans = mutualism, S. mutans + humans = parasitism or maybe not ??? ;)
Good luck to all of us this appl. cycle.
 

coconutdental

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There also S. mitis and salivarius that are in the mouth. Also, I think that killing S.mutans would result in decreasing normal flora which I believe is not that good. Just think about what happens when you kill E. coli in your gut with antibiotics. I guess, it's called disbacteriosis and it takes time to regain E.coli back.
And yeah, E.coli + humans = mutualism, S. mutans + humans = parasitism or maybe not ??? ;)
Good luck to all of us this appl. cycle.


Interestingly, this effect is only specific to S. mutans. Other bacteria that a members of the oral normal flora were not significantly affected. All experiments so far were done in vitro. It will be interesting to see some animal studies.
 

DiNoZeRo2o9

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Hey one of my dad's students is one of the authors =P He wrote me a letter of rec. for UCLA too!
 

jay47

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I'm pretty sure that as long as humans walk the earth, and eat food, there will be a large need for dentists.

I once remember my microbiology professor say that if there was a war between humans and bacteria, they would win every single time. I think that may be the case here as well.
 

DSpagnoli

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This newly discovered oral streptococci can out-do every virulent factor of S. mutans that makes it the most cariogenic oral bacteria!! Is the end of 'drill and fill' approaching?:confused:

Our preventive professor was talking about this the other day in lecture....probably would take quite a long time to pass in legislation if it even got that far. Also needs extensive in vivo testing...this whole thing will most likely be shot down during in vivo testing. Putting this stuff in a dish is a little different than putting it in a dynamic system like the oral cavity. There are questions about how this would be administered hypothetically, and how it would be available to the general public. Doesn't really matter anyway since most of the younger cohort is at least 50% caries free. We are going to be making most of our living doing secondary restorations on babyboomers. I've drilled out only 3 amalgams now....I better get good at it I guess.
 
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