BeachBlondie

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So, I've been reading a good deal of threads recently of pre-meds casually dropping the fact that their daily schedules include studying all day, everyday.

I'm not certain if this is simply another form of auto-bolstering of the ego, if it's true, or if I'm just a rebellious pre-med...but that's certainly not the case for me.

I'm committed to studying incessantly about a week before exams. But, other than that I indulge in...you know...seeing the sunshine once in a while. Or going to the gym. Or actually having a drink with other students.

Who here isn't a slave to the books? Speak up!

Edit: Allow me to clarify my motivations behind asking this. I think it's sad that pre-medical students spend so much time worrying about grades that DO NOT define them as a human being; and that they are missing the best years of their lives. I suppose I just wanted to see how many of us aren't neurotic.
 
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torshi

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I occasionally go out to the gym when i can, but I'm taking so many courses at once, i have to study.

Actually these past few weeks I've been so tired of studying the only thing i wanted to was lay down and fall asleep. I'm currently half asleep right now, since i just woke up...hah

But yea too much work, i try to find some time to get out do something productive.
 
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I'm a student athlete.... 20 hours a week in athletics, 10 or so in the research lab, and then when I have exams, I study.
 
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BeachBlondie

BeachBlondie

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I worry about grades, but I also go to the gym 6 hours a week, volunteer, tutor, etc. It's not like worrying about grades makes one neurotic. Why does it matter if people spend most of their day studying? Live your life and they'll live theirs. People who put down others for studying so much are just as bad as those that do nothing but study.
*sigh*

Before people start getting pissy. I was just weighing in how many students actually DO study so frequently. It's somewhat alien to me, but nothing I'm placing blame about. I suppose I was just curious as to everyone's experiences.
 
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BeachBlondie

BeachBlondie

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I'm a student athlete.... 20 hours a week in athletics, 10 or so in the research lab, and then when I have exams, I study.
I was a collegiate athlete, too! *knucks*

Maybe that's where the allocation of time commitment to lots of other obligations AND studying comes from.
 

MidnightSun32

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I don't study often. I usually study the week that I have an exam. For classes that I just need to memorize info for, I can usually do it a couple days before with flash cards. For math and chem, I just do practice problems-- typically between classes. I could study more, but I like to go out with friends and have a life.

I used to work all the time so I'm enjoying having some freedom to do things that are fun.... not spending all of that time cooped up in my house with books between shifts.
 

werd

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i wasn't even under the impression that premeds were studying all day. me and my friends who were premed all had lives. it's the (second year) med students that live the life of non-stop studying.
 
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BeachBlondie

BeachBlondie

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Calling something "sad" or an "auto-bolstering of the ego" or the fact that you have a condescending tone as if everyone who worries about grades and wants to do well is completely unsocial is a way for you to not place blame upon something? You're trying to justify your different work ethic by saying you take place in other activities that constitute more of a life than someone who tries to do as well as possible in school. You're trying to compensate.

In the end, who cares?
Hahaha If, in the end no one cares, then why lambaste me for a thread in which I was checking out the lifestyle of other pre-meds?

You see, the problem with you reading far too much into my "tone" over an electrostatic medium is that now you make YOURSELF out to be condescending. No one wins. And you being confrontational is neither justified nor desired by anyone here.

If you would read my original post, I said, "I don't know if it's auto-bolstering of ego, if it's true, or if I'm a rebellious pre-med." Wouldn't you say that's a statement in which I'm trying to ascertain where I, myself, stand within the realm of pre-meds? And, I said it was sad that these students had work so hard because they don't get as many opportunities to have free time. If you were to ask them, I'm sure they would tell you that there are moments when they'd wish they had more time to do something other than find themselves buried beneath an avalanche of books.

This was an attempt to get a feel for everyone else in my situation. Nothing more.
 
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BeachBlondie

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chloe, circulus, and werd--

That's what I had assumed most of us did. Maybe SDN has a tendency to bring out students with heavy course-loads. I just thought I had seen an influx of comments from people about how often they camp out in the library.
 

MidnightSun32

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chloe, circulus, and werd--

That's what I had assumed most of us did. Maybe SDN has a tendency to bring out students with heavy course-loads. I just thought I had seen an influx of comments from people about how often they camp out in the library.
I've met some students at my school that swear they spend all day studying. They are also the first gunner type students I've ever actually met lol. They sort of freak me out... a little intense... I try not to look directly at them... lol. I met them in my evolution of health care class; it's FULL of these whacky pre-meds. I know people need to study, but they take it to the extreme.
 
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BeachBlondie

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They sort of freak me out... a little intense... I try not to look directly at them... lol.
HAHAHAHA!! I feel like you're describing some sort of mythical text book goblins.
 

getright

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I lightly review material a couple of weeks before exams. Then I just study hardcore when they're a few days away. It works for me and I still have a lot of time to do other things.
 
Oct 20, 2010
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So, I've been reading a good deal of threads recently of pre-meds casually dropping the fact that their daily schedules include studying all day, everyday.

I'm not certain if this is simply another form of auto-bolstering of the ego, if it's true, or if I'm just a rebellious pre-med...but that's certainly not the case for me.

I'm committed to studying incessantly about a week before exams. But, other than that I indulge in...you know...seeing the sunshine once in a while. Or going to the gym. Or actually having a drink with other students.

Who here isn't a slave to the books? Speak up!

Edit: Allow me to clarify my motivations behind asking this. I think it's sad that pre-medical students spend so much time worrying about grades that DO NOT define them as a human being; and that they are missing the best years of their lives. I suppose I just wanted to see how many of us aren't neurotic.

I am not going to both with reading the replies to your thread but just explain what I think about premeds and their study habits.

First of all, I want to point out a few facts.

Sleep consolidates memory. In reinforces the memories you have formed, and opens up space for new memories.
Long periods of time interspersed with random things that will drown out memories between consolodiation of memory during sleep and studying diminishes what you can retain.
Anxiety and a feeling of "pressure" and "urgency" facilitates memory formation.
Memories are formed through repetition. In otherwords, unless you are a waiter and making full use of the zeigarnik effect, you have to review to form a memory.
Short periods of time between repetition (idealy through unaided retreival and making use of short term memory) helps solidify memories. That's why people like flashcards. Many don't understand why they work through, and will make hundreds of thousands of them. Best method is a a dozen or so flash cards and quick repetition. In other words, you are trying to memorize a complex structure for organic chemistry or biochemistry. Get out a sheet of paper, review 3 different ones. Try to draw them based on that short term memory image you have in your head without looking at the structure. Find out where you made a mistake, and repeat. Short periods (not to long, not back to back, just re-reading) of time between reviewing the material is key.

A technique I developed over 6 years of trying to succeed in school (actually only really got it like a year and a half ago, but it works) with ADHD but no prescription is this.

Consolidate the material the evening after the lecture. Just go over it again, write down the things that seem important. If it is all important and you have to memorize 200 biochemical pathways write them all down. Review that night.
Sleep right after that. Long period of time, of drinking or watching TV or what will drown out any thing in your mind. (7-8 hours is best).
Wake up and chances are you will be able to rattle off everything you reviewed the night before.

Week or two before the test.... (anxiety and that feeling of pressure that increases memory formation starts to kick in). Break your days up into halves.

Study non stop a variety of different topics with short breaks between periods of repetition. Over that time you will get to the point where you can regurgitate what you memorize. Now is the half day step.
Take a 3.5-4 hour nap. This will get you through a single cycle of rem sleep. Repeat the studying again with different material, with another 3.5-4 hour nap after wards. Repeat.

After ~ 2 days of that, get a full night sleep. Making sure you review everything you went over before going to sleep shortly after waking up. Retrieval is the key to LTP.

When it comes to memorization all day every day isn't going to help much, especially if they take long breaks, don't review the next morning, and don't get through 2 cycles of rem sleep.

When it comes to practice, again sleep plays a key role.

It has been proven through studies using video games, that after playing a video game for an extended period of time, the "player" becomes 'practiced'. He then sleeps, and that creates a motor pattern. Basically, he learned how to do something while playing and did it. Sleep turned that into a kind of "autonomic" process so the next time he plays he is better at it.

Runners take advantage of that through training for triathlons.

REM sleep is the key to memory consolidation and "practice".

Exercise is also important. Exercise releases endorphins and those have been shown to facilitate memory formation.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/39791
 

MidnightSun32

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HAHAHAHA!! I feel like you're describing some sort of mythical text book goblins.
Well, I always thought people exaggerated about them. Come to find out, no... they were quite accurate! The gunners in my class drive me b-a-n-a-n-a-s! It's like the M&Ms commercial.... they do exist! :D

P.S. I have a test on Thursday and I haven't started studying yet so that should answer the original question. :eek:
 
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BeachBlondie

BeachBlondie

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Well, I always thought people exaggerated about them. Come to find out, no... they were quite accurate! The gunners in my class drive me b-a-n-a-n-a-s! It's like the M&Ms commercial.... they do exist! :D

P.S. I have a test on Thursday and I haven't started studying yet so that should answer the original question. :eek:
So do I! HHAHAHAHA Granted, I've been slipping in some studying here and there. But, it hasn't hit the 72-hour extravaganza.
 

MidnightSun32

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I'm lucky that only two of my classes have exams and finals this semester (well I had another but it ended already)!! The others just have papers to write. I did have to do a 2.5 hour presentation, but it wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be!

Can we begin the count down 'til the next holiday break??? I'm already ready!
 
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BeachBlondie

BeachBlondie

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I am not going to both with reading the replies to your thread but just explain what I think about premeds and their study habits.

First of all, I want to point out a few facts.

Sleep consolidates memory. In reinforces the memories you have formed, and opens up space for new memories.
Long periods of time interspersed with random things that will drown out memories between consolodiation of memory during sleep and studying diminishes what you can retain.
Anxiety and a feeling of "pressure" and "urgency" facilitates memory formation.
Memories are formed through repetition. In otherwords, unless you are a waiter and making full use of the zeigarnik effect, you have to review to form a memory.
Short periods of time between repetition (idealy through unaided retreival and making use of short term memory) helps solidify memories. That's why people like flashcards. Many don't understand why they work through, and will make hundreds of thousands of them. Best method is a a dozen or so flash cards and quick repetition. In other words, you are trying to memorize a complex structure for organic chemistry or biochemistry. Get out a sheet of paper, review 3 different ones. Try to draw them based on that short term memory image you have in your head without looking at the structure. Find out where you made a mistake, and repeat. Short periods (not to long, not back to back, just re-reading) of time between reviewing the material is key.

A technique I developed over 6 years of trying to succeed in school (actually only really got it like a year and a half ago, but it works) with ADHD but no prescription is this.

Consolidate the material the evening after the lecture. Just go over it again, write down the things that seem important. If it is all important and you have to memorize 200 biochemical pathways write them all down. Review that night.
Sleep right after that. Long period of time, of drinking or watching TV or what will drown out any thing in your mind. (7-8 hours is best).
Wake up and chances are you will be able to rattle off everything you reviewed the night before.

Week or two before the test.... (anxiety and that feeling of pressure that increases memory formation starts to kick in). Break your days up into halves.

Study non stop a variety of different topics with short breaks between periods of repetition. Over that time you will get to the point where you can regurgitate what you memorize. Now is the half day step.
Take a 3.5-4 hour nap. This will get you through a single cycle of rem sleep. Repeat the studying again with different material, with another 3.5-4 hour nap after wards. Repeat.

After ~ 2 days of that, get a full night sleep. Making sure you review everything you went over before going to sleep shortly after waking up. Retrieval is the key to LTP.

When it comes to memorization all day every day isn't going to help much, especially if they take long breaks, don't review the next morning, and don't get through 2 cycles of rem sleep.

When it comes to practice, again sleep plays a key role.

It has been proven through studies using video games, that after playing a video game for an extended period of time, the "player" becomes 'practiced'. He then sleeps, and that creates a motor pattern. Basically, he learned how to do something while playing and did it. Sleep turned that into a kind of "autonomic" process so the next time he plays he is better at it.

Runners take advantage of that through training for triathlons.

REM sleep is the key to memory consolidation and "practice".

Exercise is also important. Exercise releases endorphins and those have been shown to facilitate memory formation.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/39791
Wow.

Solid work.
 
Oct 13, 2008
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Do what you love, do well enough in your classes. If you have a lot of hard classes, you may have to study more. If it's your senior year, you may gain benefit from not doing homework/studying (for interviews, socialization, things you want to do before md school). That's my philosophy, at least.
 

Lunasly

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So, I've been reading a good deal of threads recently of pre-meds casually dropping the fact that their daily schedules include studying all day, everyday.

I'm not certain if this is simply another form of auto-bolstering of the ego, if it's true, or if I'm just a rebellious pre-med...but that's certainly not the case for me.

I'm committed to studying incessantly about a week before exams. But, other than that I indulge in...you know...seeing the sunshine once in a while. Or going to the gym. Or actually having a drink with other students.

Who here isn't a slave to the books? Speak up!

Edit: Allow me to clarify my motivations behind asking this. I think it's sad that pre-medical students spend so much time worrying about grades that DO NOT define them as a human being; and that they are missing the best years of their lives. I suppose I just wanted to see how many of us aren't neurotic.
Relax buddy. It doesn't meke sense to call those who continually study neurotic. Perhaphs studying is what makes them happy.
 

SimplyMars9

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Believe it or not, I actually had no idea pre-meds studied so much until I was introduced to SDN. I thought that pre-meds were the biggest slackers ever. Most of my friends spent their time partying it up and cramming 2 nights before exams...

...or it's entirely possible my friends have all been lying about their study habits lol
 

Janieve

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Oct 22, 2009
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I think that for most reasonably serious premeds (not "serious to the point of burnout" or "eh, med schools are okay with a 2.3, right?" premeds) don't study all the time. It just becomes a matter of balance.

Like, a reasonable schedule for me goes something like:

-Morning Class(es)
-Review (15 mins, tops)
-Gym
-Afternoon Class(es)
-Review
-Work
-Socialize
-Study/Homework
-End

Startlingly manageable. :eek: And the best part is, studying just 45 minutes-1 hour per night means you don't have to cram before tests. Handy.
 

Ursa

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i sleep on my back with books laying open on my face
 

gravitywave

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i wasn't even under the impression that premeds were studying all day. me and my friends who were premed all had lives. it's the (second year) med students that live the life of non-stop studying.
yep. i'm M1 and certainly don't study all the time, although some of my classmates sure do. all the M2's were looking kinda constipated in September though, and now that Step I is less than three months away, i never see them any more :laugh:

in general it seems that the people who were hardcore studiers in undergrad still are once they get here. most of us that weren't, still aren't (although we work harder than we used to). people don't change the habits that have always worked for them unless those habits stop working out.