Oct 10, 2014
3
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Hello.

I am in my third year at a university in the US. I am a Biology major and doing pre-med. I am hoping to go to medical school in Europe. I know that everywhere else, high school students go straight into their specialized schools without going through a 4 year general university.

I was wondering how my education in the US would complicate me going into a European med school? Also what special requirements would I have to have in order to get in? If I can't get into med school, can I do my residancy and still practice there.
I am mainly interested in Ireland and Scandinavia. I am a non-EU citizen but I hope to practice in a European country after I graduate.

Any tips would be very helpful as I have no idea where to start. :)
 
Jul 28, 2015
2
0
Status
Medical Student
As someone who studies in English in Poland in a 6-year program as a (albeit an EU-citizen growing up outside of Europe) amongst students primarily from Sweden/Germany/ Canada and some from the US/Ireland/Norway, perhaps I’ll be able to help you with some facts. My information may not be entirely accurate though as I’m in a slightly different situation from yours, so I’d appreciate it if someone else “in the know” could correct me/provide further details.

So first of all, regarding studying in Europe. Your question is rather broad, because although it applies generally to the “European Union”, regulations do still differ from country to country and more specifically from university to university.

I believe that your situation of being in pre-med, majoring in Biology shouldn’t be a problem. In fact, it could serve as an advantage. Whilst the direction of completing high school and immediately entering a 6-year medical program is indeed the most popular route, there are courses in Europe popping up that are in fact “4-year” medical programs (So called “Graduate Medical Program” for people with degrees around the medical sciences/biology fields). As far as I know, such courses are available for foreigners in select Irish and Polish universities in particular. Apparently UK, Dutch, Portuguese and Czech universities also offer this option but I’m not certain on whether they have programs for foreigners. Admission requirements will once again differ from university to university. Unfortunately no such programs exist in the Scandinavian countries, but as far as I’m aware and judging by the number of Swedish students that I study with (Making up approx. 80% of my year), it is EXTREMELY difficult to get into Medicine in Sweden.

If you’re considering studying in Europe nonetheless, the fact that you're a non-EU citizen is crucial. On top of that I’m assuming that you may not be proficient in languages such as Swedish or Polish. So what you’ll be looking for is:
1. Countries that are English speaking (e.g. Ireland as you mentioned) or
2. Countries that have English teaching programs. These especially include Eastern Europe e.g. Ukraine, Poland, Hungary, Romania. However if you wish to study in the national language of the country you’d like to stay in, I know that there are students who enter university language programs in said country, and learn that language for 6months-1 year. Studying in the local language of the country you plan to study in is generally very advantageous: Not only will you be able to communicate by yourself with patients (Thus immensely contributing towards your growth as a doctor), but it is highly likely your tuition fees will be much lower.

If you are indeed considering taking the route of studying in english in a non-english speaking country just remember:
  • Teaching quality (Although I strongly believe in self-study and the idea of someone being entirely reliable for the doctor they become, take note that in non-english speaking countries clinical classes may be difficult for foreigners, and these are the moments where you learn crucial details),
  • Tuition fees and
  • Outlook on foreigners
differs widely between these countries, so you’ll need to do your research on each country/university separately.

Regarding residency/work: I can tell you that in Poland there are a number of foreigners graduating in Poland (who have in the meantime become proficient in the language) who stay on to work/do residency here. Generally the EU countries are accepting of graduates within the EU for work, but the hospital you end up in may be highly reliant on your grades/the program you complete (e.g. english speaking program in non-english speaking country). However, being a non-EU citizen may make things a bit more difficult. On top of that, keep in mind, graduating abroad will make it difficult to return/practice in the US. It’s possible, but you’ll complicate the entire situation for yourself. As for American graduates working in Europe, I believe it’s possible although I’ve yet to meet a US graduate here. It will depend on the need for doctors in various countries. You’ll possibly need to go through licensing/language proficiency examinations, and will need to apply for a work visa.
 

Yazo

5+ Year Member
Jul 28, 2012
180
38
As someone who studies in English in Poland in a 6-year program as a (albeit an EU-citizen growing up outside of Europe) amongst students primarily from Sweden/Germany/ Canada and some from the US/Ireland/Norway, perhaps I’ll be able to help you with some facts. My information may not be entirely accurate though as I’m in a slightly different situation from yours, so I’d appreciate it if someone else “in the know” could correct me/provide further details.

So first of all, regarding studying in Europe. Your question is rather broad, because although it applies generally to the “European Union”, regulations do still differ from country to country and more specifically from university to university.

I believe that your situation of being in pre-med, majoring in Biology shouldn’t be a problem. In fact, it could serve as an advantage. Whilst the direction of completing high school and immediately entering a 6-year medical program is indeed the most popular route, there are courses in Europe popping up that are in fact “4-year” medical programs (So called “Graduate Medical Program” for people with degrees around the medical sciences/biology fields). As far as I know, such courses are available for foreigners in select Irish and Polish universities in particular. Apparently UK, Dutch, Portuguese and Czech universities also offer this option but I’m not certain on whether they have programs for foreigners. Admission requirements will once again differ from university to university. Unfortunately no such programs exist in the Scandinavian countries, but as far as I’m aware and judging by the number of Swedish students that I study with (Making up approx. 80% of my year), it is EXTREMELY difficult to get into Medicine in Sweden.

If you’re considering studying in Europe nonetheless, the fact that you're a non-EU citizen is crucial. On top of that I’m assuming that you may not be proficient in languages such as Swedish or Polish. So what you’ll be looking for is:
1. Countries that are English speaking (e.g. Ireland as you mentioned) or
2. Countries that have English teaching programs. These especially include Eastern Europe e.g. Ukraine, Poland, Hungary, Romania. However if you wish to study in the national language of the country you’d like to stay in, I know that there are students who enter university language programs in said country, and learn that language for 6months-1 year. Studying in the local language of the country you plan to study in is generally very advantageous: Not only will you be able to communicate by yourself with patients (Thus immensely contributing towards your growth as a doctor), but it is highly likely your tuition fees will be much lower.

If you are indeed considering taking the route of studying in english in a non-english speaking country just remember:
  • Teaching quality (Although I strongly believe in self-study and the idea of someone being entirely reliable for the doctor they become, take note that in non-english speaking countries clinical classes may be difficult for foreigners, and these are the moments where you learn crucial details),
  • Tuition fees and
  • Outlook on foreigners
differs widely between these countries, so you’ll need to do your research on each country/university separately.

Regarding residency/work: I can tell you that in Poland there are a number of foreigners graduating in Poland (who have in the meantime become proficient in the language) who stay on to work/do residency here. Generally the EU countries are accepting of graduates within the EU for work, but the hospital you end up in may be highly reliant on your grades/the program you complete (e.g. english speaking program in non-english speaking country). However, being a non-EU citizen may make things a bit more difficult. On top of that, keep in mind, graduating abroad will make it difficult to return/practice in the US. It’s possible, but you’ll complicate the entire situation for yourself. As for American graduates working in Europe, I believe it’s possible although I’ve yet to meet a US graduate here. It will depend on the need for doctors in various countries. You’ll possibly need to go through licensing/language proficiency examinations, and will need to apply for a work visa.
As a Pole/EU citizen living in the US, I'd like to look into Poland. However, the only thing holding me back is the tuition fee. Do you think I could get any kinds of loans or scholarships?
 
Oct 29, 2015
3
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
well you can get into the Universities in Romania. I can help you out with it .. myself having completed undergraduate studies in Romania and doing residency too now here with an English language program i haven't faced so much of a problem to adjust with the system and language here .. as we learn the language gradually and slowly so you do not need to spend an extra year just to learn the language