Suggested Anatomy books?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by kimchifly, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. kimchifly

    kimchifly New Member
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    I'm taking some time off before my first year and wanted to take a look at some anatomy books. I've looked into Grant, Netter, Rohen, etc. and they all seem to have different pro/con's.

    Can anyone tell me what their opinion is on the clearest anatomy book for dissections?

    Also, anyone know of any good clinical anatomy books?

    thanks.
     
  2. njbmd

    njbmd Guest
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    Hi there,
    The best anatomy books are going to be the ones that your schools suggests in conjunction with your classes. Every medical school tests differently and without the class work and notes, reading the books is going to be pretty useless. You need to be in the class and seeing what works best for you.

    My school had an in-house dissector that riveled any of the commercially available dissectors. This with Baby Moore was all one needed for Gross Anatomy.

    Again, every school is different so hold off on purchasing the Anatomy books until you get to class. You can easily end up with hundreds of dollars of books and atlases that are not that useful.

    njbmd :)
     
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  3. DoctorFunk

    DoctorFunk Get down with the boogie
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    Netter is great for an idealized view of the body, and is the only book I consider essential. Moore's Clinical Anatomy is good for the clinical connections, and is usually a great source for information on the written exams. Not sure about a book for dissecting, as my group usually just goes in all guns blazing and figures out what is left to ID at the end of the day. ;)
     
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  4. OSUdoc08

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    ESSENTIAL: ROHEN (photos of lab --> can substitute for extra time in lab)

    GOOD: NETTER (good for completeness of structures --> best drawings)

    OK: MOORE & DALLEY (good for clinical correllations)

    HORRIBLE: GRANT (awful drawings)
     
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  5. Dr.Doom

    Dr.Doom Junior Member
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    I really like Ellis' Clinical Anatomy. I'd be lost without it and Netter's.
     
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  6. emack

    emack Senior Member
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    I agree.
    I thought I would love anatomy-- and I did-- except for labs. Getting over initial shock was relatively easy, but I could never get used to the stench. It's not even a strictly olfactory thing for me (horrible sense of smell), but I'd still get lightheaded after an hour or so, and inevitably come home with a headache.
    I couldn't avoid extra lab time entirely, but for those evenings when I just couldn't bear the thought of trudging back over, donning the stinky lab coat, and spending more time poking around in puddles of juice, Rohen was definitely a good friend.
     
  7. mojojojo

    mojojojo Member
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    I find Netter and Rohen to be essentials.
     
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  8. dinesh

    dinesh Senior Member
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    Netters is great, a must have.
     
  9. MadameLULU

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    I like Moores for explanations of relationships (antatomy at my school is poorly taught), but for pics Netters is good and then I look at Rohens before I go into lab.

    Also, the Ackland videos are really really good, although that guy is kinda creepy.
     
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  10. EvoDevo

    EvoDevo Forging a Different Path
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    I'll echo Netter's for an atlas. I have Rohen's too, and while I agree that it can be somewhat useful, I've found that in many cases it's less than complete.

    If you need an anatomy text, I recommend "Gray's Anatomy for Students." The explanations are awesome and many of the diagrams for innervation, or pleural spaces, are wickedly clear when compared to other sources.
     
  11. emack

    emack Senior Member
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    Gray's was useful, although I found myself using it less as the weeks went by. If you can get an access code from someone for the online material for it at studentconsult.com, you can get all the diagrams for free (and the diagrams are the best part, for sure).
     
  12. logos

    logos 100% Organic
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    I would say Grants >> Netters.
    The rationale being that the drawings in grants are less cartoon like. They are more like what you will actually see in anatomy lab. Netter's drawings look like cartoons, they may help you get relationships down, but they wont help you recognize structures in lab. This is why all the professors in our anatomy dept. suggested that we get grants...and after seeing both it makes a whole lot of sense...the class ended up being about 50/50 grants/netters.

    Rhoens is also good.
     
  13. JETER

    JETER Super Educated, I'm Smarter than Spock
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    If you can find it, Sobotta's atlas is hands down better than Netter, Grant and maybe even the new Gray's. It is a bit pricey, but worth it.

    It gives you the best of Netters (the attention to detail, relationships, etc) and Grant's (perspective, real-life color, etc). Do a little comparative shopping, and you won't be disappointed.
     
  14. Emergency!

    Emergency! Senior Member
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    My combination was this: Netters for the relationships, Grant's for the explanations, and Rohen's or Downstate's Anatomy site for lab practicals.

    However, don't necessarily go out and BUY all of them. I purchased Netter's and loaded Dynamic Human Anatomy v. 2.0, which comes with Grant's Atlas, and loaded it on my computer. DHA is great, as it includes many (but not all) of the illustrations and explantions from Grant's, but also has a neat feature where you can turn off the labels and quiz yourself on the structures. I used Downstate's website pretty extensively for studying practical stuff, as if followed the dissection procedure we used pretty closely. NetAnatomy's site is also a great resource, although they don't currently have the back and head/neck region available in the "gross anatomy" section.

    I don't know if all schools do this, but our library had copies of all of the atlases on closed reserve where we could check them out for two hours at a time. I recommend buying whichever you like best, and then using the library to supplement as necessary, rather than buying several.

    Oh - and don't spend too much time trying to get ahead on anatomy. Enjoy the time you have before school starts doing things for pleasure . . . say like reading fiction, because once classes start your time will be much more limited.
     
  15. orientedtoself

    orientedtoself resident
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    I would recommend studying histology instead of anatomy if you really feel like you need to study something medical during your year off. Anatomy is three-dimensional, and you can't learn that from books. It will be much easier when you actually have your cadaver to look at. I suggest Wheater's histology- slides are flat, and the pictures are pretty!
     
  16. OSUdoc08

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    I second the Wheater's.
     
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  17. MadameLULU

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    i just realized that the OP hasn't started med school yet.

    My advice. DO NOT STUDY!!! RELAX!!!
     
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  18. lord_jeebus

    lord_jeebus 和魂洋才
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    I would not purchase any books prior to starting anatomy class.

    That said, I use the Sobotta and Rohen atlases. I think Sobotta is better than Netter (more realistic, more plates [especially for bones and joints], useful tables, mini latin dictionary, depictions of anatomical variations, attractive nude woman on Plate 2), but not enough to justify paying full price (around $180?) for the 2 volumes. For an illustrated atlas, consider Clemente's atlas, which mainly uses illustrations from Sobotta, with some added commentary. It is quite affordable.

    I found Rohen indispensible in the early weeks of my anatomy course, when I didn't know what I was looking at, but as time passed I used it less and less.

    The new Moses atlas has some very nice photos, I suggest looking into this one as a Rohen alternative.

    I also read Big Moore for a while, but I didn't have the strength to get past Chapter 4.
     
  19. marooner

    marooner Member
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    netter is the best atlas i have ever found. the pictures were too ideal though hey... if you really want to learn anatomy and how it is described in many textbooks, netter is really recommendable.

    as for text i'd go for NMS anatomy or the one written by pansky. outlined texts works for me. it facilitates memorization and understanding.
     
  20. GuP

    GuP Senior Member
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    im surprised you guys are sleeping on Snells
     

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