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Summer Job in an ER

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by flynnt, Jan 23, 2002.

  1. Dr. Wexler

    Dr. Wexler Member
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    I am currently a high school senior. I have volunteered in an ER for the past two years. This summer after I have been considering working as an ER tech (not neccessarily at the hospital I volunteer at). What do you think my chances of being taken seriously are, given I have no formal training past first aid and CPR, will only have recently graduated HS, and will only want to hold the job for the summer.
    Also what is the best way to approach finding a job? Presently, I can find no listings for a ER tech position open. Should I just call the hospital and explain what I am looking for?
     
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  3. Sonya

    Sonya Senior Member
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    Hi,

    I don't know a lot about ER medicine, but i doubt you could get a job as a tech without formal training.
    But someone else would be better to answer that.

    If you volunteered in the ER, than you probably know people there well. Tell them your plans, ask them for contacts of people at ERs where you would want to work. I'm sure the people you volunteer with could tell you a lot.

    Will you be 18 once you graduate? That could make a difference.

    Where are you looking for job postings? Maybe call around the hospital to find where they have a job listing directory.

    Hope this helps.
    Sonya
     
  4. irongirl

    irongirl Member
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    Most ER Departments want you to have your CNA and/or EMT licenses, plus some experience. I am an EMT, and thought about working as an ER Tech, and that's what most of the places were looking for, but you should look at specific hospitals in your area to be sure.
     
  5. You have the right idea, going after a job in the ER, but I'd suggest a few things. First, if you are searching at a Level 1 trauma center ER, good luck as I don't you'll have any there without experience and certification. Maybe more so at a smaller ER to start. Maybe look into starting in the ICU, in maybe a clerical position and then moving up after 1 year. The ICU or even a CCU or Day Surgery unit or even Recovery Room for that matter could possibly afford a patient care, entry level job, but consider your age. These jobs are a great way to start and include various bedside procedure assisting and inventory control, code response, etc. It's what I did in college (ICU) then tranferred to the OR and stayed there till graduation, doing weekends mostly and some evening shifts. Most big trauma ERs want their techs to have BCLS and ACLS and maybe cert also. The job is far more diverse today than ever before and it's a great college job, even part time. Be patient, get to know the people in the department, let them get to know you and be dependable and hard working, but you can only go so far without credentials in the ER or OR. Good Luck!
     
  6. calaxer19

    calaxer19 Senior Member
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    If your interest is in Emergency Medicine, I highly suggest enrolling in an EMT-B program. Trying looking at local community colleges or just asking the ED you work in.

    EMT-B cert. is fairly simple to get, relatively quick (my program was 2.5 months including clinicals), and is usually a prereq for even an entry level in the ER.

    I had a great time in my program, and would have taken the class even if I were not interested in putting the cert to work. Money and time very well spent!
     
  7. calaxer19

    calaxer19 Senior Member
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    Forgot to mention: I don't think you'll get any kind of paid position in the ER, but maybe in the ED (but you don't want to be doing admin. stuff anyway). For me, it's tough getting a position enough with EMT-B cert.

    Somethings you'll need before the EMT course (at least for Cali): BCLS (Adult and maybe child/infant CPR), TB skin test (within 6 months), and all your shots up to date (HepB included).

    Good luck!
     
  8. Mossjoh

    Mossjoh Mayo Clinic-PGY2
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    I have worked as an ER Tech throughout college. At the ER I work for, you have to be certfied as an EMT or CNA. You must also be certified in CPR for adults, children, and infants. We are also trained in pheblotomy ect ect ect.
    I worked in the ER as a lower position before and got to know the staff, then moved up to Tech. Now I'm known as one of the best Tech's in the ER, you just have to work hard and earn their trust, they will let you do a lot.

    Mossjoh
     
  9. Dr. Wexler

    Dr. Wexler Member
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    Getting EMT certs is something I have toyed around with for a while. I dont know of any courses I would be able to fit into my schedule though. (student, varsity athlete, part time job, chasing girls, etc. ) During the spring it probably wouldn't be possible. Maybe over the summer though. Also, what does CNA training entail, and what are they allowed to do?( in Pennsylvania specifically.)
    BTW, I volunteer at a level-I trauma center but in a perfect world, I would work at a community hosptial closer to my house. The upside to the trauma center is that I know people there so it might be easier to get a job there.
     
  10. newfocus

    newfocus Senior Member
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    Dr. Mossjoh is correct, I worked as an ER tech for about 2 years and most ER's do require you to have a CNA or EMT-B (I was lucky and went to church with one of the ER attendings) I started off as a care assistant but advanced to a tech in about 3 months. Once you become a tech you can take courses in trauma, splenting, phlebotomy and so on and thats when you really start to have fun! If your looking just for summer employment your options are rather limited. Are you not planning on going to undergrad in your home state? Why just a summer job?

    newfocus out~
     
  11. pre-hawkdoc

    pre-hawkdoc Senior Member
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    flynnt, the people that you should be asking are those that you work with in the ER. I'm from a relatively small town (~35,000 pop., ~170 bed hospital) and i work in the ER when i'm home from school. they'll most definitely want you to have some kind of training, but i took a CNA class that lasted a week and a half, was really easy and the hospital paid for it. they mainly make you do that for legal reasons--once you have some kind of certification, they can train you to do various other things that are more applicable to your job. but, in a world of "who you know" i'd definitely suggest talking to the nurse manager (or whoever handles the ER personnel) at the place you volunteer. s/he can likely give you the best/most practical advice and may even have connections at smaller hospitals closer to your home. that's my advice. good luck.
     
  12. Sheri911

    Sheri911 Junior Member
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    Why do you want to work in the ER? I am a pre-med student and paramedic in a level 2 center here in texas, and we have several techs here (EMT-B and CNA's) that are pre-med and working to "get in" with the docs....what needs to be realized is that the docs usually don't spend much time with you because as a tech it is your job to do a lot of clerical and re-stocking unless you have advanced skills (eg :p aramedic or nursing student)and since a lot of the techs I work with are pre-med hopefiuls, they aren't focused on the job they are hired for as much as getting to know the docs for letters of rec...it puts a large strain on everyone, and a lot of people within the ER's have become skeptical of pre-med techs....just some info....being pre-med myself I see where you are coming from, but also working in a fast-paced ER I also see what a bad name some pre-med techs give to the ones who are serious about working AND getting in with the docs....just my $0.02.....
     
  13. Mossjoh

    Mossjoh Mayo Clinic-PGY2
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    I sense bitterness....

    Anyway, most of the RN and MD's in our ER say that the pre-med tech's are the best because they actually know what is going on and what to look for in patients. (Warning signs of oncoming crises..ex stroke, MI, ect) They also feel that the knowledge of anatomy and function of the body is a great asset.

    Sheri, your post doesn't float with me...getting to know the docs is helpful, but that isn't why we are there.
     
  14. Gotrob

    Gotrob Member
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    Call and talk to the HR department at a couple of hospitals/health organizations in your area. Some hospitals/orgs are so hard up for people they would be happy to give you the training you need. Also, there are many, many jobs that would give you great exp in a hospital. The HR people will be able to tell you what is available, what you qualify for, and/or what they will be willing to train you for.
     
  15. styphon

    styphon Senior Member
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    What exactly is an ER tech?

    Here in upstate New York hospitals have "Unit Assistants" and some have "Personal Care Technicans." These jobs require only a CPR card and a highschool diploma.
     

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