Suspicious about UMich

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by JulianCrane, Jun 13, 2002.

  1. JulianCrane

    JulianCrane The Power of Intention

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    If the University of Michigan is a state school, why, according to MSAR, are they accepting a few more out of state applicants than in-state applicants? Aren't Michigan residents supposed to have an advantage at this school?
     
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  3. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member

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    the in-state percentage is composed solely of people from michigan. the out-of-state percentage is composed of applicants from all of the other 49 states combined. so michigan residents DO still have an advantage.
     
  4. westsidespartan

    westsidespartan Senior Member

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    Good question. It's a state school, supported by Michigan taxpayers, to train out-of-state students. I am very biased being a Spartan, but that's just another thing I can't stand about UMich.
     
  5. jot

    jot

    i always thought that despite it being called UMichigan, it was a private school (or medical school) just like PennStates Med school (private). MSU is the stateschool (yeah spartans).
    -jot
     
  6. smid

    smid Member

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    Go Spartans (my fiance is an alumni) :)

    I think the [problem is that there are not so many people in michigan applying to medical schools, and there are 3 medical schools there. I'm sure they take well-qualified applicants from MI FIRST and prefer them, but if someone has a low gpa, MCAT and the only thing they've got going for them is their state of residency, it doesn't make sense to take them. The out of state people pay out of state tuition (although a friend of mine who got in last year from CA was offered in state tuition after he told them he was going to go to UCLA instead).

    Anyway, I'm applying there, and I am from CA. Sorry. I guess they just want to get the best class they can and hope that people that graduate from UM will stick around and BE tax payers.
     
  7. smid

    smid Member

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    also, i read on their website that around 65% (or 60%) of their class is from U of M undergrad. That's pretty biased, too. Then MSU has pretty high, then UC system (CA) and then NY schools. I forget the exact breakdown.
     
  8. Amma

    Amma Member

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    i just graduated from UM undergrad and I agree that it seems weird at the med school. They do accept lots of out of state people and the general feeling among the pre-meds seemed to be that UM med school doesnt often take its undergrads. Honestly, I didnt want to go there, so maybe i am not the best person to respond. I do know, however, a few people who are going there next year and they are all chummy with the dean of admissions (i seemed to have forgotten her name).
     
  9. Explosivo

    Explosivo blah!

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    I believe Michigan wants to be competitive so it would rather have a larger applicant pool to choose from. They do however still give some preference to in state residents. Believe it or not, UCLA does a similar thing it's just chance though that 85% of students there are from California. In fact UCLA gives absolutely no preference to California residents according to their website.

    Then there are private schools like University of Chicago and Rush which despite being private schools, do tend to give some preference to in-state residents.
     
  10. aquapants

    aquapants Member

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    I go to Umich, and have done a little research on the issue. In order to recieve state funding, schools in Michigan have to maintain a certain percentage of in-state students as specified by legislation.

    U of M is public, but is always pushing up the number of out of state students to improve its rankings (it is A LOT easier to get in if you are in-state).
     
  11. wgu

    wgu Senior Member

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    I'm an undergrad @ Umich. This is true stats from American Medical Colleges Data Warehouse: students with undergrad degrees from UM = 68 or 40% for one of the years. Students from the state of Michigan: 93 (54%); 7 of them from MSU. Harvard: 6, Stanford: 5, UCBerk4, U of Wahington 4, ...

    Oh yeah school is very cheap for the in-stater since tax money helps you out. Right now I'm paying 1/3 the cost of the outstater in tuition.
     
  12. JulianCrane

    JulianCrane The Power of Intention

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  13. poindexter

    poindexter Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by smid:
    <strong>also, i read on their website that around 65% (or 60%) of their class is from U of M undergrad. That's pretty biased, too. Then MSU has pretty high, then UC system (CA) and then NY schools. I forget the exact breakdown.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">As an incoming M1 at Umich, just thought I'd post what I know. The main reason the % of the class from UM undergrad is so high is because about 40 students used to be (and still do, though this year is the last) in the BA/MD program and were therefore guaranteed admission. It will be interesting to see what happens with the numbers next year.

    As far as the 50/50 split between in-staters and out-of-staters, I don't really know what the deal is. However, recently the University of Minnesota president resigned, and there has been a lot of talk on public radio about how he wasn't able to accomplish his main goal--making the U of MN more of a nationwide university "like the University of Michigan." Take that for what it's worth, but I find it hard to believe that Minnesota (undergrad and medical school alike) could raise their reputation to the level of Michigan without widening their applicant pool and accepting more out-of-staters.

    Just some additional thoughts...
     

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