Quantcast

teach for america or grad school?

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

stat3113

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
Messages
140
Reaction score
0

Members don't see this ad.
I'm a graduating senior with a long-term goal of medical school. I still have Organic II and 1 sem Bio to go before finishing the prereqs. Obviously, I have not taken MCAT. My GPA is not competitive for med school.

Here are my options:

1) Do Teach for America, teaching math for 2 years in an underprivileged high school. During that time period, finish the prereqs, try to take crap to boost the gpa, and take the MCAT. Then apply to enter med school.

OR

2) Enroll in a MS/PHD program in Biostatistics. Meanwhile, finish prereqs and take MCAT. Apply to med school after 1 year of the program. (Then try to work out a dual degree if I get into med school hopefully.)

I very much prefer #2 and my main motivation for #1 is that I've been told that it increases your chances of getting into a good med school drastically. That it really helps you stand out and show that you are committed to improving the world, etc, etc. lol. That's not the only motivation, I still would like to teach children in need, but I'd rather go to grad school.

The question: Thinking SOLELY of my chances of getting into med school, all else being equal, out of these two options, is one better than the other?

Thanks for your feedback.
 

pretenda

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2006
Messages
214
Reaction score
3
If your GPA is not up to par and you want to attend an allopathic school your only choice is number 2. However more meaningful and important TFA is it will not make up for a "poor" GPA.
 

notdeadyet

Still in California
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2004
Messages
11,777
Reaction score
2,013
If your GPA is not up to par and you want to attend an allopathic school your only choice is number 2. However more meaningful and important TFA is it will not make up for a "poor" GPA.
Seconded. Though I'd consider a postbac rather than a master's. You can take some upper division classes in your postbac to make up for the lower grades.
 

Doctor Bagel

so cheap and juicy
Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2002
Messages
10,910
Reaction score
1,152
If your GPA is not up to par and you want to attend an allopathic school your only choice is number 2. However more meaningful and important TFA is it will not make up for a "poor" GPA.

Well, we don't know how bad the op's gpa is, and one big thing to note is that graduate grades don't raise your ugrad gpa, which is main gpa schools care about. If the op could reasonably raise his/her gpa by finishing his prereqs and taking some extra ugrad classes, it might be a better idea. If the op really needs to do major work on the gpa, he/she should probably be looking at smp programs instead of a more traditional graduate program since again schools don't care that much about graduate grades.

Also, the op needs to be 100% committed to finishing any program he/she starts, which is the downside of jumping into a true graduate program.
 

MonkeyNuts!

Even Kal has bad days...
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2005
Messages
3,646
Reaction score
14
Unless you are applying to texas schools, grad school grades don't raise your gpa. For texas, a grad school gpa of 4.0 will raise you about .1-.3 depending on how many credits.

I wouldn't sacrifice my grad school for antyhing in the world, it was the best time I had in school. In fact, if I could go back in time and change things, I wouldn't fix my crappy gpa because it took the grad program for me to grow as a student and mature

may not be the same for you, but at the very least u seem to already know grad school is the way you want to go
 
Top