skatertudoroga

Removed
Apr 23, 2010
316
0
Status
In which specialty am I more likely to get more time off? Which is closer to dermatology in terms of lifestyle? From my own research it seems that neurologists get 6wks off at VA centers and comparable time off in private outpatient practice. Anesthesiologists supposedly get 10-12wks off but it is becoming increasingly difficult to get a good job. So is it possible that 10yrs from now you will not get a job unless you agree to never have a chance of making partner and getting those 10wk vacations? After all if you don't own the patients and there are plenty of CRNAs and with all the advances in technology/automatism it's possible that there will be more grads than jobs and you'll be interviewing for a job the same way that lawyers or other non-doctors interview for their jobs?
 

LRAccord624

MSIII
Oct 18, 2009
747
6
Houston
Status
Medical Student

Negrodamus

GOD emperor Doe
Sep 25, 2010
3,043
14
Status
>CRNA
>Anesthesia
inb4 'day took ur jerbs'

 
Jul 19, 2010
677
6
Old Swampy
Status
Medical Student
In which specialty am I more likely to get more time off? Which is closer to dermatology in terms of lifestyle? From my own research it seems that neurologists get 6wks off at VA centers and comparable time off in private outpatient practice. Anesthesiologists supposedly get 10-12wks off but it is becoming increasingly difficult to get a good job. So is it possible that 10yrs from now you will not get a job unless you agree to never have a chance of making partner and getting those 10wk vacations? After all if you don't own the patients and there are plenty of CRNAs and with all the advances in technology/automatism it's possible that there will be more grads than jobs and you'll be interviewing for a job the same way that lawyers or other non-doctors interview for their jobs?
A/I and rheum are more like derm than neuro or anesthesiology not only in terms of the quality of life, but also in reagrds to how you practice medicine
 

startswithb

Future Urologist
7+ Year Member
Jan 31, 2010
1,750
90
Status
Resident [Any Field]
A/I and rheum are more like derm than neuro or anesthesiology not only in terms of the quality of life, but also in reagrds to how you practice medicine
You don't understand, skateordie isn't interesting in the practice of medicine, he is interested in money and vacation. And hot single moms.
 

mmmcdowe

Duke of minimal vowels
Staff member
Administrator
Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2008
9,782
1,580
Status
Resident [Any Field]
It's a road to happiness, not a den of dreams.
 

wolverinepwns

Si vis pacem, para bellum
7+ Year Member
May 9, 2010
1,204
8
Asgard
Status
Resident [Any Field]
LOL, when you're a medical student and do rotations you'll find out! and besides, Everyone knows that its the Neuroplasticcardio Surgeons that get the most vacation.
 

Forthegood

ProcrastinationAficionado
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2008
844
7
Lexington, KY
Status
Medical Student
You don't understand, skateordie isn't interesting in the practice of medicine, he is interested in money and vacation. And hot single moms.
What? Where? Hot moms? Huh?

Why am I supposed to care if they are single again?
 

BF2BC EMT

5+ Year Member
Aug 1, 2010
149
0
?
Status
Medical Student
What the hell is wrong with you? Moms?

I don't stick my penis in anything older than 13. If they're REALLY hot, then 14. Pubic hair is disgusting, not to mention the fact that their crying for help gets just downright annoying the older they get. Although I make exceptions for administrators of top medical schools (;) if you're reading this LizzyM).
should be* reported to the local authorities after posting something like this and I hope you are*.
 

solo75

7+ Year Member
Jul 13, 2010
365
2
Texas
Status
Medical Student
Wow, do some home work before asking such a naive question. No wonder you're getting flamed. Neurology and anesthesia are polar opposites and neither one is really similar to derm...
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
7+ Year Member
Nov 10, 2009
16,100
5,349
Status
Medical Student
Wow, do some home work before asking such a naive question. No wonder you're getting flamed. Neurology and anesthesia are polar opposites and neither one is really similar to derm...
I guess this is your first skater thread eh?
 

Ignatius M.D.

5+ Year Member
Nov 13, 2010
1,676
21
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Wow, do some home work before asking such a naive question. No wonder you're getting flamed. Neurology and anesthesia are polar opposites and neither one is really similar to derm...
Mmm first one I disagree with, but yes derm is completely different. You do need to know a good bit of neurology as an anesthesiologist.
 

Ignatius M.D.

5+ Year Member
Nov 13, 2010
1,676
21
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Thank you for this. The part about a "hot woman's friend's kid" really got me going, then the "I don't want to be a pathologist, I want to be impressive" actually brought me to tears. I haven't laughed so hard in a while... thank you.
:laugh: +1. "wtf. i don't even like that guy. he is fat and bald. I want to be like Dr. House but also have a life outside of medicine. I met a milf today today at a park but if I were to try to explain how it relates to my interests in medicine people would not take me seriously".

Nearly peed myself in while reading this in the medical library. He wants people to take him seriously while simultaneously discussing his plans for bagging a MILF. :laugh:
 

getright

7+ Year Member
Feb 24, 2010
499
2
Status
Pre-Medical
What is the thread he made where he says he's going to drink on the job. I love skater.
 

solo75

7+ Year Member
Jul 13, 2010
365
2
Texas
Status
Medical Student
Mmm first one I disagree with, but yes derm is completely different. You do need to know a good bit of neurology as an anesthesiologist.
I meant polar opposites in type of work, not subject matter. Neurologists are more clinical while anesthesiologists live in the OR.
 
OP
skatertudoroga

skatertudoroga

Removed
Apr 23, 2010
316
0
Status
I meant polar opposites in type of work, not subject matter. Neurologists are more clinical while anesthesiologists live in the OR.
I know that. I think the major difference is that 99% of the time no matter what an anesthesiologist does the result is the same. Unless they figure out how to preserve tissue when someone lost too much blood to live or some other completely new drug anesthesiology basically reached its peak. Neurology deals with many diseases where you spend a lot of time diagnosing something but then cant do anything to treat it, no procedures, unlike giving them a drug to go to sleep and to wake up. And I do know that neither is much like dermatology because there you are 100% outpatient and you make a lot of money to remove skin lesions or inject botox throughout the day. I guess the major difference is that dermatology is unrealstically competitive while the other 2 specialties can be attained by anybody if he makes it his goal from day1 of med school. In fact for neuro or anes you can make it your goal to end up at your geographical location of choice if you plan ahead. Perhaps doing research the summer after year 1 helps,etc. But i dont want to end up in a specialty where pay really sucks or lifestyle really sucks.
 

courtnes

ASA Member
7+ Year Member
Aug 16, 2010
1,199
76
Stillers Country
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I meant polar opposites in type of work, not subject matter. Neurologists are more clinical while anesthesiologists live in the OR.
Living in the OR isn't clinical?

Sorry, couldn't resist. Yes, neurologists do spend the majority of their time in a clinic, while anesthesiologists spend theirs in the OR (though don't forget pre-admissions testing.)
 

Ezekiel2517

Anesthesiologist
10+ Year Member
Jan 21, 2005
618
567
CA
Status
Attending Physician
There are anesthesiologists who spend all day in the clinic as well, it's called pain management. They also do critical care and run surgical ICU's.
 
OP
skatertudoroga

skatertudoroga

Removed
Apr 23, 2010
316
0
Status
There are anesthesiologists who spend all day in the clinic as well, it's called pain management. They also do critical care and run surgical ICU's.
Those are subspecialties which are very different from general anesthesia. One might argue that Pain is a lifestyle specialty, but it's just not something I would want to do. I think Pain is like Oncology... As for ICU, again it's not a lifestyle specialty and sometimes they tell parents "your kid is braindead, would u like to donate his organs?".
 

lftbndlbrnchblk

7+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2010
187
0
Status
Neurology deals with many diseases where you spend a lot of time diagnosing something but then cant do anything to treat it, no procedures, unlike giving them a drug to go to sleep and to wake up.
The migraines that you're giving everyone in this thread can be treated with medications prescribed by a neurologist after they do thorough evaluations and rule out many things using their training. That's just one example. You might have to research these fields beyond what board scores medical students will need, what their salaries are and what their time off schedules look like. How about looking into what they actually do? Getting into medical school will illuminate a lot of helpful stuff and going in with an open mind will make it enjoyable! Focus on that first.
 

Forthegood

ProcrastinationAficionado
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2008
844
7
Lexington, KY
Status
Medical Student
Those are subspecialties which are very different from general anesthesia. One might argue that Pain is a lifestyle specialty, but it's just not something I would want to do. I think Pain is like Oncology... As for ICU, again it's not a lifestyle specialty and sometimes they tell parents "your kid is braindead, would u like to donate his organs?".
Who cares that it is a subspecialty? It is part of your training in a Gas residency. You may not even have to do advanced training if you play your cards right. I don't think this is a reason to rule it out. Not that Gas is the way for you to go... it's not super easy to get in and you might have to occasionally take call (gasp).
 
OP
skatertudoroga

skatertudoroga

Removed
Apr 23, 2010
316
0
Status
The migraines that you're giving everyone in this thread can be treated with medications prescribed by a neurologist after they do thorough evaluations and rule out many things using their training. That's just one example. You might have to research these fields beyond what board scores medical students will need, what their salaries are and what their time off schedules look like. How about looking into what they actually do? Getting into medical school will illuminate a lot of helpful stuff and going in with an open mind will make it enjoyable! Focus on that first.
yes i know that you can prescribe medications for migraine. i guess migraine is an uncurable but manageable disease like diabetes. so i guess it's not bad to have those patients. thats why i mentioned neurology.. i think rheumatology is another good one? theyve been featured on mystery diagnosis a lot lately. they would be a great specialty if they could actually do EMGs instead of neurologists. But ultimately i want to not have to worry about finding work and to have a nice lifestyle and income. really stability and lifestyle are even more important than income. though you cant discount income too much considring i'll start making money only at 35 while people like accountants and cops have been working for 15years by then.
 
OP
skatertudoroga

skatertudoroga

Removed
Apr 23, 2010
316
0
Status
Who cares that it is a subspecialty? It is part of your training in a Gas residency. You may not even have to do advanced training if you play your cards right. I don't think this is a reason to rule it out. Not that Gas is the way for you to go... it's not super easy to get in and you might have to occasionally take call (gasp).
I meant that I looked into anesthesia but not those subspecialties because i believe they are even further away from dermatology. My main problem with anesthesia is that in 10years it may be difficult to find work. Just read up anesthesia forums. They talk about employment ads being fake(i.e. you come in for an interview and only then do you find out that if you want to take vacation you have to pay $10k/week, or the position might not even exist). It is becoming increasingly common to not make partner as an anesthesiologist. You want to work in nyc, you work for somebody else while he makes twice or 3x as much. So I have reason to believe that anesthesiology does not have the stability that is so important for me.
Call is not a big deal for me if it means I can take 10wk vacations and make mad $$. Just like doing well in school is just a small nuisance on your way to grateness...
 
Jul 19, 2010
677
6
Old Swampy
Status
Medical Student
yes i know that you can prescribe medications for migraine. i guess migraine is an uncurable but manageable disease like diabetes. so i guess it's not bad to have those patients. thats why i mentioned neurology.. i think rheumatology is another good one? theyve been featured on mystery diagnosis a lot lately. they would be a great specialty if they could actually do EMGs instead of neurologists. But ultimately i want to not have to worry about finding work and to have a nice lifestyle and income. really stability and lifestyle are even more important than income. though you cant discount income too much considring i'll start making money only at 35 while people like accountants and cops have been working for 15years by then.
PM&R folks do EMGs too
 

lftbndlbrnchblk

7+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2010
187
0
Status
yes i know that you can prescribe medications for migraine. i guess migraine is an uncurable but manageable disease like diabetes. so i guess it's not bad to have those patients. thats why i mentioned neurology.. i think rheumatology is another good one? theyve been featured on mystery diagnosis a lot lately. they would be a great specialty if they could actually do EMGs instead of neurologists. But ultimately i want to not have to worry about finding work and to have a nice lifestyle and income. really stability and lifestyle are even more important than income. though you cant discount income too much considring i'll start making money only at 35 while people like accountants and cops have been working for 15years by then.
Why don't you just do ER? It's among the shortest residencies, the money is really good, it's shift work, you can get a job anywhere and there's a lot of variety with your patients. And there are so many days off in a month, it works out to like 18 days on and 12 days off sometimes depending on the group of physicians you end up with. You can progress and do tox or sports med. Or even peds ER, so yes, you can specialize further. Where's the bad in that? If you're in it for money/lifestyle - there you go.
 

solo75

7+ Year Member
Jul 13, 2010
365
2
Texas
Status
Medical Student
Why don't you just do ER? It's among the shortest residencies, the money is really good, it's shift work, you can get a job anywhere and there's a lot of variety with your patients. And there are so many days off in a month, it works out to like 18 days on and 12 days off sometimes depending on the group of physicians you end up with. You can progress and do tox or sports med. Or even peds ER, so yes, you can specialize further. Where's the bad in that? If you're in it for money/lifestyle - there you go.
Sounds good in theory but That "shift work" is misleading. I think I'd rather have a more routine schedule than what they have to go through.
 
Jun 30, 2010
183
0
Status
Pre-Medical
My uncle is a neurologist, who has his own practice.

He works 9-5, for 5 days a week. He also takes a 2 hour lunch break from 9-5, where he goes home and takes a nap and eats lunch. He spends 6 weeks a year on vacation. He manages to pull in 400k. I am not going to lie, he lives a pretty nice life. :)


I wouldn't mind taking over his practice once he retires (that is if none of his other kids become doctors---fingers crossed).....
 

solo75

7+ Year Member
Jul 13, 2010
365
2
Texas
Status
Medical Student
My uncle is a neurologist, who has his own practice.

He works 9-5, for 5 days a week. He also takes a 2 hour lunch break from 9-5, where he goes home and takes a nap and eats lunch. He spends 6 weeks a year on vacation. He manages to pull in 400k. I am not going to lie, he lives a pretty nice life. :)


I wouldn't mind taking over his practice once he retires (that is if none of his other kids become doctors---fingers crossed).....
Same experience here... Although I don't know about 400K
 
OP
skatertudoroga

skatertudoroga

Removed
Apr 23, 2010
316
0
Status
My uncle is a neurologist, who has his own practice.

He works 9-5, for 5 days a week. He also takes a 2 hour lunch break from 9-5, where he goes home and takes a nap and eats lunch. He spends 6 weeks a year on vacation. He manages to pull in 400k. I am not going to lie, he lives a pretty nice life. :)


I wouldn't mind taking over his practice once he retires (that is if none of his other kids become doctors---fingers crossed).....
Thats kind of what I want. What are the most common diseases that he treats or diagnoses? And does he work in a large single specialty group? or is he a solo practitioner?
 
OP
skatertudoroga

skatertudoroga

Removed
Apr 23, 2010
316
0
Status
Why don't you just do ER? It's among the shortest residencies, the money is really good, it's shift work, you can get a job anywhere and there's a lot of variety with your patients. And there are so many days off in a month, it works out to like 18 days on and 12 days off sometimes depending on the group of physicians you end up with. You can progress and do tox or sports med. Or even peds ER, so yes, you can specialize further. Where's the bad in that? If you're in it for money/lifestyle - there you go.
I like that though as the poster above said their hours are deceiving. It's unclear if they are allowed to take long vacations or their colleagues will be pissed. But most of all I doubt i have the aptitude to be a good ER. It seems that interpersonal skills is their most important asset. And they need to do the most with their patient in 5mins. While I am the type of person who gets exponentially more done as he learns more about the problem, concentrates on a single task. I guess it's possible to work at a rural ER and have all those pluses. But I would prefer to rely on my technical or diagnostical skills rather than on my interpersonal skills.
 

mmmcdowe

Duke of minimal vowels
Staff member
Administrator
Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Sep 13, 2008
9,782
1,580
Status
Resident [Any Field]
My uncle is a neurologist, who has his own practice.

He works 9-5, for 5 days a week. He also takes a 2 hour lunch break from 9-5, where he goes home and takes a nap and eats lunch. He spends 6 weeks a year on vacation. He manages to pull in 400k. I am not going to lie, he lives a pretty nice life. :)


I wouldn't mind taking over his practice once he retires (that is if none of his other kids become doctors---fingers crossed).....
Unfortunately your uncle is living a dream that is rapidly becoming impossible in neurology and most specialties.
 

Ursa

woof
5+ Year Member
Oct 19, 2010
1,077
2
Status
Medical Student
My uncle is a neurologist, who has his own practice.

He works 9-5, for 5 days a week. He also takes a 2 hour lunch break from 9-5, where he goes home and takes a nap and eats lunch. He spends 6 weeks a year on vacation. He manages to pull in 400k. I am not going to lie, he lives a pretty nice life. :)


I wouldn't mind taking over his practice once he retires (that is if none of his other kids become doctors---fingers crossed).....
I mean I was never that good at math, but...
 

NickNaylor

Thank You for Smoking
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
May 22, 2008
16,885
7,780
Deep in the heart of Texas
Status
Attending Physician
Sounds good in theory but That "shift work" is misleading. I think I'd rather have a more routine schedule than what they have to go through.
All depends on what you're looking for. A limited number of shifts is traded for potentially crappy hours.

I'd be more worried about being replaced by mid-levels in the long-term. I really don't see ER physicians surviving for much longer in the future... I think NPs and their equivalents will ultimately turn EM into a big referral machine.
 

courtnes

ASA Member
7+ Year Member
Aug 16, 2010
1,199
76
Stillers Country
Status
Resident [Any Field]
There are anesthesiologists who spend all day in the clinic as well, it's called pain management. They also do critical care and run surgical ICU's.
Thanks for that, I always forget about PMR. As an anesthesia RA, I'm in the OR all day and was simply speaking from what I do and see everyday.

I was more making the distinction that if it has to do with patients, it's clinical.
 

lftbndlbrnchblk

7+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2010
187
0
Status
I've worked for an emergency physicians group for 3 years now. Our's is a democratic group that offers no RVU cap, which means you can make lots of money if you chart properly on a very difficult patient (ie intubation, chest tube insert, fracture mgmt, subluxation reduction, difficult laceration or one in a bad place, etc etc). For these visits, you'll get paid more because they are procedures. If you want to know the details, let me just say it's a LOT more. In fact, that's how somebody as money-hungry as some people on SDN would be satisfied in the future if they realized the only way to make money in this business is to do procedures (i.e. procedural sedation like anesth, or surgery like a surgeon of some kind).

Also, I'm not trying to mislead him by saying it's shift work. Our physicians work 8-12 hour shifts. We use programs to schedule all of them, so that they roughly work 180 hours per month or thereabouts. Yes, they are random but it's not terribly difficult to manage. They can work extra shifts if they wish and if they become partners in the group (they make almost triple their salary) and they can work less if they want to after that. You'll have to work nights and weekends. You'll get over it. All of us are going to do our ER rotations in our 4th year. Watch, you'll get over it.

I will not comment on the difficulty of an ER physician but I'll tell you, it's difficult for me to imagine a mid-leveler taking over the responsibilites of an ER doc. Definitely PAs anyway. Some critical care skills aren't even part of their curriculum. I can't say much about NPs. Besides, PCP's already function as referral machines. Or they should, anyway. Patients need to be educated on what the ER is used for and the ER doc shouldn't have to arrange for the management of patient's chronic illnesses but sometimes that's the case in situations where there's no PCP.

Interpersonal skills aren't a nice thing to have as a physician. It's almost required. This point is argued on this forum once in a while and attracts all the misinformed people who automatically assume pathology or surgery is the way to go for the social invalids. I have many years of hospital experience, I can tell you in this difficult atmosphere that being a jerk anywhere in the hierarchy will not get you far and it has gotten a handful of individuals fired. We can go into that too if you want.
 

Geekchick921

Achievement Unlocked: MD
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Nov 6, 2007
8,829
165
34
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Thanks for that, I always forget about PMR. As an anesthesia RA, I'm in the OR all day and was simply speaking from what I do and see everyday.

I was more making the distinction that if it has to do with patients, it's clinical.
Just to be clear, PMR != Pain Management. PMR = Physical medicine and rehabilitation. It's a different specialty from anesthesiology, but either could partake in a pain management fellowship. I think the ones at my hospital are anesthesiologists, with maybe one PM&R doc as well. Neurologists (and I think also psychiatrists) can also becoming pain management doctors.