Azide047

2+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2016
131
137
Status
Dental Student
Science Grades (at UW- Madison)
Gen. Chem. I: BC
Gen. Chem II: C
Intro Bio I: C
Intro Bio II: D
Stats: BC
(Freshman, sophomore year)
Current GPA (w/ non-science courses included): 2.47
Still have to take ochem, biochem, physics, and many more.

My freshman and sophomore year I followed a cramming strategy for a lot of these classes which clearly hasn't worked well. However, I think my study habits have improved and I've gotten smarter about what to study. Our introductory general chemistry and biology courses were a lot worse than I anticipated and I did not prepare myself for that. For Gen chem II I had a B average for every exam, but I barely had time to study for the final and failed it. Intro bio second semester focused on plants which I detested since I prefer human biology and crammed heavily.
If I had to do this over I would probably study every day rather than cramming.

What are my options if I still want to pursue premed? Is a steady upward trend of grades going to be enough? Or am I going to have to consider post-bacc? Or should I stop thinking medicine altogether?

I want to go into pediatrics for a million reasons but mostly because medicine is my biggest passion. I feel like I can do it but I feel like I just need to figure out how to stop setting myself up for ****ty grades.
If you can keep all your semesters until you graduate at a 4.0 (ideal world) that would bring you up to a 3.25 cGPA assuming 60 credits done, 60 credits to go.
Then you would need to do an SMP to be taken seriously and ace that and the MCAT. If you're ready to turn things around, go for it. Not too late. But I would say it is definitely too late to consider going straight from college to med school.

Instead of a steady upward "trend" I highly recommend you get it together as soon as possible. Get a tutor, limit social time, get off social media and bombard your professors with intelligent questions during office hours. Do whatever you need to do to get the grade.

Think of this like practice for MD/DO school. Look at DO school requirements.

If you can't learn to ride with training wheels, you can't ride without them when you're all by yourself and can't lean on all the resources undergraduate institutions provide (office hours, science learning center, supplemental instruction, volunteer tutors, paid tutors, etc.)
 
Sep 1, 2015
400
676
Status
Medical Student
If you can keep all your semesters until you graduate at a 4.0 (ideal world) that would bring you up to a 3.25 cGPA assuming 60 credits done, 60 credits to go.
Then you would need to do an SMP to be taken seriously and ace that and the MCAT. If you're ready to turn things around, go for it. Not too late. But I would say it is definitely too late to consider going straight from college to med school.

Instead of a steady upward "trend" I highly recommend you get it together as soon as possible. Get a tutor, limit social time, get off social media and bombard your professors with intelligent questions during office hours. Do whatever you need to do to get the grade.

Think of this like practice for MD/DO school. Look at DO school requirements.

If you can't learn to ride with training wheels, you can't ride without them when you're all by yourself and can't lean on all the resources undergraduate institutions provide (office hours, science learning center, supplemental instruction, volunteer tutors, paid tutors, etc.)
I think that you are well meaning but you are new to this forum and new to pre-med (as of tonight?). I would avoid dishing out hard and fast advice for a little while. Honestly I'd avoid dishing out hard and fast advice unless you are an adcom. As of now, based on other posts of yours, it seems like you don't know the significant differences between the MCAT and the DAT, nor do you know how to obtain a hospital volunteering position nor what a competitive medical school application would look like. This is fine, you are new to this, but since you are in the early stages, maybe maintain a learning and questioning role on this forum before you start telling others that they "definitely" cannot go straight from undergrad to medical school. We have very limited information on this poster other than their grades. FAR more goes into medical school admissions than grades.

Finally, addressing your last point, there are actually many levels of support and many resources available at medical schools, arguably more than those available to undergraduate students. I have access to volunteer tutors, office hours of block directors and lecturers, podcasted lectures, flashcards and study materials made by the class, paid (by the school) subscriptions to learning websites and study tools, counseling, and academic specialists available to develop individualized study plans with me. So yes, it is absolutely important to be able to motivate yourself, however, it's not like you are going to get into medical school and just be abandoned. The curriculum is more difficult but as a result, there are more helping resources in place.
 
Last edited:

UserUnidentified420

2+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2016
78
61
Status
Pre-Medical
Science Grades (at UW- Madison)
Gen. Chem. I: BC
Gen. Chem II: C
Intro Bio I: C
Intro Bio II: D
Stats: BC
(Freshman, sophomore year)
Current GPA (w/ non-science courses included): 2.47
Still have to take ochem, biochem, physics, and many more.

My freshman and sophomore year I followed a cramming strategy for a lot of these classes which clearly hasn't worked well. However, I think my study habits have improved and I've gotten smarter about what to study. Our introductory general chemistry and biology courses were a lot worse than I anticipated and I did not prepare myself for that. For Gen chem II I had a B average for every exam, but I barely had time to study for the final and failed it. Intro bio second semester focused on plants which I detested since I prefer human biology and crammed heavily.
If I had to do this over I would probably study every day rather than cramming.

What are my options if I still want to pursue premed? Is a steady upward trend of grades going to be enough? Or am I going to have to consider post-bacc? Or should I stop thinking medicine altogether?

I want to go into pediatrics for a million reasons but mostly because medicine is my biggest passion. I feel like I can do it but I feel like I just need to figure out how to stop setting myself up for ****ty grades.
Hi! Your grades were similar to mine. It IS possible to come back from that, but you need to really think about how to improve. It most definitely IS POSSIBLE. The key is to persevere. What the first year did is to set you up for a harder second year because of bio grades. I did not see much correlation between gen. chem and o. chem so I think chemistry-wise you should be fine. Biology is different. I retook my gen bio classes because a solid foundation is needed to do well in later courses such as micro, genetics, molecular cell, and biochemistry. My two cents, hope it helps you :D!
 
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LizzyM

the evil queen of numbers
10+ Year Member
Mar 7, 2005
23,153
32,718
Status
Academic Administration
Clearly, whatever you have been doing is not working for you and you should not move forward until you figure out how to change things and improve your performance. Please, please, please, work toward a minimum 3.0 cumulative (meaning you need to be averaging 3.5 or so going forward) as what you are doing now will close you out not only of medical school but of most graduate programs as well and that is really tough.

Osteopathic medical schools will replace your poor Chem, Stats & Bio grades with whatever you score in a second attempt at each of those so you might consider repeating those classes but not until after you figure out how to study effectively.

Get over not doing well in subject areas you don't like (such as plants) as you are going to be faced with topics that don't interest you over and over again.
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
53,574
78,760
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
To follow up on my learned colleague's wise advice, OP, seek out your school's learning or education center, STAT. They will help you with study techniques, learning styles etc.

You can't cram. It doesn't lead to retention. You have to learn and apply.

Strongly suggest that you retake any science grades < B.



Clearly, whatever you have been doing is not working for you and you should not move forward until you figure out how to change things and improve your performance. Please, please, please, work toward a minimum 3.0 cumulative (meaning you need to be averaging 3.5 or so going forward) as what you are doing now will close you out not only of medical school but of most graduate programs as well and that is really tough.

Osteopathic medical schools will replace your poor Chem, Stats & Bio grades with whatever you score in a second attempt at each of those so you might consider repeating those classes but not until after you figure out how to study effectively.

Get over not doing well in subject areas you don't like (such as plants) as you are going to be faced with topics that don't interest you over and over again.