The Impracticalities Of A Medical Career

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Iain, Nov 3, 2002.

  1. Iain

    Iain Semental Blanco
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    I have been analysing my options of going on a post-bacc course and the whole medical school deal, or getting involved in the business world. I know my parents want me to get involved in business (follow my fathers footsteps), and I am very sure I could be very successful at it. I flew through bachelors degree in business, and graduating at 19. This means all the thing that I think we all want like home ownership, new cars, settling down, etc are not that far away. I also have an established network of many up and coming business leaders, which will help me in this career.
    However I keep thinking about wanting to become a doctor. Every plan I have made in the last 4-5 years had an exit point to run away and go to medical school. A medical career in the long run would be incredible rewarding, and something I would definitely enjoy, however with it all the perks of the business world go. While I am living in a small apartment, study hard, increasing debt exponentially all my friends will be advancing in their careers, starting families, buy houses, settling down and living life. My biggest concern is if I am not able to get into med school after my post bacc course (I keep hearing about the horror of organic chemistry and chemistry in JHS [the last time I took chemistry] was my worst subject) then I would have wasted time, and delayed all the good things.
    Has anyone else ever had these thoughts? How do you look at the ups and downs of the a medical career, especially the length of training and cost?
     
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  3. mountainlander

    mountainlander Junior Member
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    This may sound trite, and not what you are looking for....


    If it's in your blood, there's nothing you can do but pursue it.

    I tried running the other direction for almost 4 years--was afraid of the long training, the outrageous debt, a life of being on call....

    Where am I now? 4 years older, and applying anyway....
     
  4. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Membership Revoked
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    Medicine is something you do because you know it's what you need to do with your life.

    No way of rationalizing it...it just happens.

    I think medicine picks you, rather than you picking medicine.

    Just my opinion.
     
  5. peabody

    peabody Member
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    Something that has always made me think when having similar doubts - there is the remark of a famous rabbi Zusya, in the 19 century, that in the world to come G-d would not ask him, "Why were not you like Moses?" But G-d would ask him, "Why were you not like Zusya?" There is the notion that everyone in the world has a role to play - if in your heart you truly think medicine is that for you, then it probably is.

    Be what you are - I think when we follow what is right for us, more often then not the littlier things that might hold us back initially ultimately work out, or prove not to be as great obstacles as maybe we once thought.

    Good luck!
     
  6. AlternateSome1

    AlternateSome1 Burnt Out
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    If you are 19, it doesn't seem unreasonable to remain a full time student for two more years so that you can do your premed courses without having to worry about LIFE. Have you considered that as an option?

    ~AS1~
     
  7. cardiosurg

    cardiosurg Senior Member
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    SINCE I WAS VERY YOUNG (3 YRS OLD) I HAVE ALWAYS SAID THAT I WANTED TO BECOME A DOCTOR. I WAS FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO HAVE VERY SUPPORTIVE PARENTS. HOWEVER, THE REST OF MY FAMILY WAS NOT SUPPORTIVE (BUSINESS TOO). THEY DO NOT UNDERSTAND THE DRIVE OF A WOMAN TO BECOME A SURGEON. THEY SEE ONLY THE NEGATIVES (LONG CALL, NOT MUCH OF A FAMILY/SOCIAL LIFE, TOO LONG IN SCHOOL). I TRIED TO PURSUE OTHER FIELDS (NURSING, JOURNALISM, BUSINESS), BUT I STILL DID NOT FEEL SATISFIED. HOWEVER, WHEN I COME TO WORK AND SEE THE PATIENTS'S FACES AND SEE WHAT ONE DAY I WILL BE DOING, IT KEEPS ME MOTIVATED. YOU NEED TO FIND OUT WHAT DRIVES YOU TO BECOME A DOCTOR AND FOCUS ON THAT. VOLUNTEER AT A LOCAL HOSPITAL OR INDIGENT CLINIC, FOLLOW SEVERAL LOCAL DOCTORS AROUND. TRUST ME, WHEN YOU STAY AT THE HOSPITAL UNTIL MIDNIGHT IN SURGERY ONLY TO BE BACK AT 6 AM- YOU WILL GET THE FEELING AS TO JUST HOW MUCH YOU WANT SOMETHING. BEST OF LUCK TO YOU. :D
     
  8. Random Access

    Random Access 1K Member
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    I agree. It's rather difficult at such a young age to be admitted. Enjoy college for a few more years. ;)
     
  9. Zoobaby

    Zoobaby Monkey Wrench
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    I had the same thoughts. I chose business. I had the nice car, cool apartment, lots of young, motivated friends who liked to work hard all week and party hard on the weekend. I also made quite a bit of money.

    It wasn't satisfying. Now, after two years of post-bac work, I'm in the thick of the interview process. I couldn't be more excited.

    There have been plenty of advantages to going into business for 4 years, but the ones you mention are pretty low on the list. I have skills that I know my classmates right out of college will not have. I also know what it's like to work 80 hour weeks in a results-driven environment. To those who think school is hard, wait until you have a BOSS who's success is based partially on your performance. The dynamic is TOTALLY different and, in my opinion, much more stressful.

    If I were you, I'd try business. Perhaps not for 4 years, but I think if you're really meant to be a doctor you will be much more sure of it after a year or two doing something you're NOT meant to do. That's what happened to me. Funny how life works out. I would not have been able to handle medical school right out of college. Now, 4 years later, I can't think of anything I want to be doing more.
     
  10. DoubleL

    DoubleL Member
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    The late mythologist Joseph Campbell says: "Follow your bliss."

    I too tried running from medicine, and didn't succeed. However, I wouldn't trade my experiences between college and now for anything in the world.

    Iain, make the decision that feels right to you and you won't regret it...

    LL
     
  11. Iain

    Iain Semental Blanco
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    Thanks for all your responses!! I am not sure if medicine is in my blood, or a way of delaying growing up (avoiding uncertainty, and responsibility). I think the best bet would be to gain first hand experience by volunteering at the hospital and working in the business environment, and then re-evaluate the situation a year later.
     

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