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Thoughts on getting an RN post Science Degree while preparing for Med School

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by helpfuldoc2b, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Banned Banned

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    If you have all the premed reqs, a Biomedical Science major, graduated 5 years ago, whats your thoughts of getting a bridge RN program i can get in a year, pay alot of bills, do a job i love in healthcare and use that to prepare for med school. Dont get me wrong, i wont want to be a nurse more than a year or two, but i think it will fulfill my temporary urge to help people and have patient contact while making a decent salary and pursuing my goal towards med school. By the way, Stats, old MCAT expired, 3.2 GPA.
     
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  3. sunnyjohn

    sunnyjohn Got Mustard? 5+ Year Member

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    In a world all my own.
    I don't think it would be worth it for a year- maybe 3 or 4 years...

    Nursing can wear on you if your heart is not in it (personal experience).
     
  4. CarolinaGirl

    CarolinaGirl 2+ Year Member

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    Nursing is not as easy as it can sound. I was a RN for 3 years knowing that I was planning to become a FNP. During that time it was hard to work as a RN knowing I wanted to be able to do more. Now I am thinking of applying to med school. I would not go become a RN if the job its self does not really interest you. Do you really want to give bed baths, change diapers, admin meds, take orders from docs and really work hard? If doing that stuff makes you feel good then go for it, if not then you may hate every minute of it.
     
  5. CmePaddlin

    CmePaddlin Deciding the next step... 2+ Year Member

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    I agree with the above posts, I am completing my my BSN soon and I feel like I just blew $60k of my parents money on a degree I dont want.
    Luckily that degree will make me enough in the next two years so I can pay all my bills and put away a few thousand so when I go to med school the bills wont be too terrible.
    In all honesty though, dont do it. It wont fulfill any temporary urges at all, its only going to make the urge to go to med school far worse, and you will be miserable in the meantime. And at the same time, if you ever once mention medical school at nursing school, both your peers and your instructors will shun you in an instant, the old crumudgeons at nursing school have an intrinsic hate for doctors it seems.
     
  6. apnea

    apnea Forgot the safe word... 2+ Year Member

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    i'm getting my RN before med school. It's entirely for money, and i really hate to say it, but RNs make a decent living and i can afford to go to a proper university this way. It's step one for me. But i'm probably not going to make the best nurse because i don't want to be a nurse, i want to be a doctor. It just pays to get me there. So if you don't have a reason other than wanting to get into the field and not wanting to wait, it's probably not worth it :(
     
  7. aspirationMD

    aspirationMD Rookie of the Year 2+ Year Member

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    I do this already (for a hell of a lot less money then a nurse!)

    So, let me just say I kind of know from experience. Unless that is the place in the medical field you want to work from, then go for. I too was going the BSN route (even just last month!) but after thinking about it long and hard, I realized that I would never be happy as a nurse. I respect nursing enough to not spend 2-4 years getting a degree while taking up someone else's spot, just to leave to become a md eventually.

    If you want to help people, I suggest finding a really great volunteer program, one that will allow you to help people and give you something important to put on your med app. You'll get clinical experience, help others and build a good foundation for acceptance ...
     
  8. JClass413

    JClass413 5+ Year Member

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    Nursing is not easy as it sounds! Not mentally hard but very demanding physically! A lot of B S work is you ask me. But I just dropped nursing in my junior going to finish it then next year I will start my new major in liberal arts / pre med. I did well in my nursing courses but it's not for me. Plus I want to be a doctor not a nurse.
     
  9. JClass413

    JClass413 5+ Year Member

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    Apr 1, 2007

    If thats the case don't be a nurse these patients deserve people who are willing to put all into them as well as the familey. Trust patients know when you don't really want to be thier for them and it bothers them a lot. I hate it when nurses treat thier patients just for money it's not a safe practice.
     
  10. JClass413

    JClass413 5+ Year Member

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    Apr 1, 2007
    Thats funny you mention that i just dropped nursing for my senior year and switched to liberal arts/ pre med and I did all this today. So when I told my nursing advisor what I was planning on doing she gave me a huge silent message "meta-message" saying your crazy and studpid she said all this through her tone and body language. Yeah it's true what you say, my nursing peers think i'm crazy for leaving nursing and being set back 2years. If you want to be an MD get out of nursing while you can.
     
  11. CmePaddlin

    CmePaddlin Deciding the next step... 2+ Year Member

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    I'm almost done with mine, so I figure I'll carry it out so I can save up some money for med school, and get some excellent ICU experience (just scored an internship at Virginia Mason in Seattle in pumonary medicine/thoracic, so its almost a shoe-in for ICU when I graduate). Plus I took advanced science classes instead of pre-nursing, so I kinda killed two birds with one stone on that route.
    Also, there are some pathophysiology PhDs at my school doing research, and I'm probably to get a paper published under one (on the effects of caloric restriction on the cytokines released by the adipocytes), so my BSN school allows quite a few opportunities to strengthen an app (as long as you dont tell them you want to apply to med school ;) ).
     
  12. Kateb4

    Kateb4 7+ Year Member

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    Do you know of a 1 year bridge program?? All that I have seen are 2 years minimum for the RN. The core nursing programs are all 2 years. The 1 year option that I have seen is LPN or even CNA and that piece of paper is absolutely worthless. If you're looking for something that you can do short term to get some medical experience, there are several options. You can get your EMT license within a short amount of time, though they don't make very good money. I think that the Surgical tech program is only a semester as well, and you could get OR experience. Or, many hospitals will hire non-certified nursing assistants. I did this for a few years and got great experience, learned phlebotomy, etc. although it is changing alot of beds and giving alot of baths.

    If you're only looking for 1-2 years, don't bother with the RN. When you start, you will be in a dept that you don't like (mostly tele/rehab and gen med floors have openings) and you will most likely have to do some time for the first 1-2 years on third shift. The positions in OB/ICU/mother-baby even ER and OR are taken very quick by seasoned nurses. At least this is the situation out by me at the hospitals that I have worked at (chicagoland), and I have a cousin in Ohio that is in her 3rd year as a RN and still working 3rd shift.
     
  13. CrazyPremed

    CrazyPremed Tearin' it up in the ICU 10+ Year Member

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    Where the sun DO shine!
    To the OP,

    I had the same plan as you. I have a BS that wasn't making me any money, but still had a couple of years left to apply to med school. I thought that a 16 month ADN program would give me great medical experience (even though I have plenty), and support me while I work to get in to med school. I am currently in the first semester of the nursing program.

    Perks: You get an understanding of actual pathophysiology, - in class and during clinicals - that you really may not get as a biology/chem/lib arts major. You will memorize the heck out of common medications. You will probably get as close to medicine as a non-medical school/mid level student can get. You can get a job that has wonderful benefits and great pay. Also, you can get practice at a good chunk of the residency scut work that you will probably have to do.

    Cons: Not only is nursing school intense, but you spend countless hours learning how to look at disease and medical treatments as a nurse. For a premed student, this was a big shift in my opinion. Secondly, although you learn about the disease process, you still don't cover it as in depth as a medical student. Sometimes you glance over it just fast enough to understand why certain nursing interventions are carried out. Finally, there is so much work (care plans, preparing for clinicals, rotating through clinicals), that it's torture to do if a person really doesn't want to be there. Imagine taking a class that you hate. Now, multiply that class by four, and add an extra 20 hours in clinical and prep time for the class. If you aren't crazy about nursing school, it's difficult to deal with. By the time you put up with all the nursing theory and culture, graduate, pass the NCLEX, get a job (which takes 6 months to a year to feel comfortable with, without the extra stress of studying for premed classes), and get a bachelor's, you may easily be so burned out that you don't want to do ANY more school!

    Don't forget, nurses wipe a$$, and collect all kinds of nasty specimens on a daily basis. They deal with irate family members, and spend hours connecting with really sick people. I don't mind it, but there is no way that I would make it through this process if I weren't crazy about nursing school (and I am).

    Basically, don't do it. It takes too much time, money, and emotional energy if it isn't something that you really want to do. Accelerated programs are even worse for people who don't want to be there. Also, you may be asked why nursing school wasn't for you. I'd be wary. Just my two cents.

    CrazyPremed
     
  14. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Banned Banned

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    Dec 6, 2006
    Google it, i think Creighton University has a one year bridge program, and Marquette University has a 16 month program even if you never took a science class in your life. At least from my knowledge,
     
  15. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Banned Banned

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    I was just intrigued by the experience and compensation you can get while focusing on your primary goal, med school. My best friends gf, works as a pysch nurse, 24 hours a week, considered full-time, any hour over 24 hours a week she gets paid double pay, and it doesnt seem too hard of a job to do. But all your advice does make sense. Thanks everyone. What about an MBA or JD as a backup, lol, now i am a really confused indecessive cookie, hahaha.
     
  16. sunnyjohn

    sunnyjohn Got Mustard? 5+ Year Member

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    Feb 24, 2005
    In a world all my own.

    Surgical tech school is 9 months to 2 years depending on the prereqs. Some places still train people to scrub OTJ, but they are few and far between.

    There are many 1 year accelerated RN programs. If anyone wants info I can help. Still, I think going into nursing is a bad idea for MOST pre-meds. If you are already in it, finish. If you have a desire to be a nurse, need a steady job and med school is 5 or so years away, maybe.

    Nursing is tough work. Pre-meds tend to think nursing school will be a breeze. Some schools are, but most nursing schools are very intense (they pile on the busy work/reading/assignments/ clinical training).
     
  17. Kateb4

    Kateb4 7+ Year Member

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    I'm sorry, you said bridge program, which is RN to BSN program and are 2 year programs. You mean an accelerated "Second Degree" program. I stand corrected. Still, I think that you'd be better off going a different route.
     
  18. horsenurse25

    horsenurse25 2+ Year Member

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    I don't know where you have worked before, but in the hospitals I have been in, nurses (at least RNs) do not do the things you mention. These are all done by the LVNs or care attendants.

    I got my BSc, Chem major, Math minor (gpa 3.85), and planned on going to med school. I was in the same boat as the OP and needed to make a living, so while I was getting my BSc, I attended nursing school (it was not as easy as you would think - I am not a particularly strong essay writer and it was a stretch) and got my RN degree (gpa 3.65).

    Meanwhile, several of my friends went on to medschool without me :( .

    I applied a few years later, was accepted, but in the end turned it down.
    I saw what my friends went through.
    I saw what horrible parents they were (due to lack of time and intense pressure, moving around to try to find residency, etc) and by then I had children.
    I saw how the program ran their lives, and several wish they had never done it in the first place.
    So I decided to go for the NP program instead.

    I have never looked back.

    When I was going through the program, everyone knew I was going for the MD (along with several others), and we did not get any negative attitudes at all from the staff or fellow students.

    If you are going to go for the MD and have the attitude that you are 'much better than this' during nursing school, well, then you will reap what you sow... and you never know...nursing mught just 'suck you in'!!
    In many ways it is more rewarding than being an MD.
     
  19. CarolinaGirl

    CarolinaGirl 2+ Year Member

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    Actually as you can see by reading several of the other posts I am not the only nurse that has had to do this. I worked at two of the top hospitals in the states in MICU and the CCU and I still found this to be my experience. I am not saying I spent every day doing this but it was part of the job. I was they type of nurse that was going to help my techs. I did not let my patients suffer in stool or without a bath b/c my tech was busy tending to the 15 patients they had that day, lol. I just wanted the op to take off the rose colored glasses and really see how it can be.

    I love being a FNP the only problem is that for where I am and what I want to do it is not helping me help others. I need to become a doc to be able to help more. There are many things about nursing that I enjoy and will willingly take with me to the medical field (if I get in). I have tons of respect for other nurses b/c it is a hard job. Some jobs are easier than others but working in a hospital over all is not always easy.
     
  20. Kateb4

    Kateb4 7+ Year Member

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    Nov 28, 2006
    Chicagoland
    Agreed, at the hospitals that I worked at (in Oncology and as a floater) it was part of the RN's daily routine to help patients ambulate, bathe, change beds if needed, admin meds, check vitals help with meals, chart for at least 1-2 hours per day, etc.! The nursing assistants did what they could, but with a patient load of sometimes 10+ they can't change every adult diaper and bed. I suppose the duties vary from floor to floor, but as a nurse you are responsable for the patient care, and can't say that it's the responsibility of the techs to empty every foley bag. You have to be prepared to take the good with the bad in any job, and the OP has to be aware that these are things that a nurse may do frequently.
     
  21. Kateb4

    Kateb4 7+ Year Member

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    Nov 28, 2006
    Chicagoland
    Also, I know many women that are in med school with kids, and I hope to be one of them very soon. They certainly do not sacrafice their families and are wonderful parents. They have to be very efficient with their time, but are just as good of parents as someone that is working full time. Yes, med school is difficult but it doesn't make you a bad parent!
     
  22. horsenurse25

    horsenurse25 2+ Year Member

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    Just wait until residency...a girl-friend of mine is doing a surgical residency...she is grateful if she gets less than a 70 hour week.

    At any rate... All my comments are completely subjective and relevant to myself. They may or may not apply to anyone else. I do not think I would have been a good parent if I had completed medical school - I tend to get too focused at times. My friends who were in med school and then in residency only see their kids for an hour or so at most a day - if at all. Often they would not get home until after the kids were in bed... For me, that is not acceptable. But for many it is. To each his own...

    Good luck to all that do it. I sincerely hope that you find what you are looking for when it is all over...
     
  23. burntcrispy

    burntcrispy Member 5+ Year Member

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    To the OP:

    I agree with the above posters. You had better look hard into nursing to see what the job is really about. I was a nurse for 6 years before beginning medical school and can truely say it was the WORST 6 years of my life. No, make that 8 years because Nursing school was total BS. You have to write Care Plans, learn very little about medicine and they are always reinforcing how they are not medical but NURSING. I honesly (very literally here) wouldn't do it again for ANY amount of money!!!!!!!!

    While in medical school I had opportunities to work PRN for very good pay but it wasn't worth it. I decided to take out more loans than to subject myself to having to do that again. Nursing will NOT help in medical school. The only advantage I had in medical school was being more familiar with how the hospital runs and being more comfortable with patients. This advantage was lost in about 1 week of wards. The didactics in nursing school are so superficial and BS that they didn't help at all for medical school. The most helpfull thing to prepare for medical school is to take some hardcore biochem, genetics, molecular/cellular biology, etc while in college. The classes in medical school are tough and move VERY fast so you have to study alot just to stay afloat. A good science background will help alot with this.

    Take it from me, nursing is not worth the money. I would try to take some classes to boost that GPA and apply to medical school as early as you could and not waste the time on nursing. My view on nursing is shared my many, many, many, many nurses. I worked with hundreds of nurses during my 6 years and I met only a few that weren't always complaining about how they hated their jobs. Most are always looking for something else to do with their lives.

    Well, enough of my rant. I rotated through the ICU recently and it brought back horrible, horrible memories of my nursing days in the ICU. I just had to vent a little. :)

    Good luck with medical school. It was the BEST 4 years of my life and now I look forward to going to work every day. Best thing about nursing for me was that it gave me some prospective about how good I have it now as a physician even though I get worked 80+ hours/wk.

    Burntcrispy, MD
     
  24. Iluvdocs

    Iluvdocs 2+ Year Member

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    Why are you on SDN (Student DOCTOR Network) anyway? You do realize that your response was not only insulting to the people who have kids but to the people who intend to have kids during medschool/residency. I think you just gave everyone above one more reason to dislike nursing. In my opinion AND experience Nurses do MOST of the grunt work along with the aides.. at least IF they are a good Nurse they do. Also to sum up.. I'm sure when we (Bad parents going through medschool) are making enough money to give our children the BEST of what this world has to offer ; the "few" years that we might of had to struggle through as parents will be well worth it not only to us but also to our children!! As far as I'm concerned what I am embarking on is only showing my child just how important he is to me.
     
  25. horsenurse25

    horsenurse25 2+ Year Member

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    Well, I am on here because
    1) it is a free country
    2) I find it amusing


    If you dislike nurses, well then, you are going to have a hard slog of it.

    My comments reflected what I personally feel and what was important to me. It really has nothing to do with nursing or Nurse Practitioners.

    As a parent I think it is imperative to be there when the kids are learning to walk, talk and read, to be there when they come home from school, to organize play days, to go to school concerts, to help with homework, to take them to sports, and on and on. Basically I wanted to simply be there for them. I didn't want a paid employee raising my kids. I realized that for me, my time spent with them was more valuable to them than pursuing personal goals, no matter how lofty.

    Perhaps you feel differently. That is just fine. You do what you gotta do.

    Anyways, this thread has completely wandered off course.

    To the OP. I would simply shadow a nurse, MD, PA, whatever the heck you are thinking of doing and not taking advice from an anonymous board. Sometimes reality gets lost in the void when entering this site. Makes for a fun read at least ...:)
     
  26. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Banned Banned

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    Yes, I meant an accelerated second degree.
     
  27. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Banned Banned

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    duplicate response.
     
  28. helpfuldoc2b

    helpfuldoc2b Banned Banned

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    grrr. sorry again, duplicate. sorry.
     
  29. Iluvdocs

    Iluvdocs 2+ Year Member

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    Upstate, Ny
     
  30. Iluvdocs

    Iluvdocs 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 9, 2007
    Upstate, Ny

    I thought about doing this but once I realized that nursing wouldn't help me get into medical school in anyway I decided to just keep my focus on the main goal. I do however think it could provide you with some good hands on experience. As a doc you will be spending alot of your time in the hospital so it could help prepare you for that. As far as you not doing it because you don't really want to be a RN.. I don't agree with some of the posters above that it would be wrong because your hearts not in it. In the end Nurse or doctor you are there to help people (hopefully:) and if your main focus is on that and not your title (and you don't mind taking extra classes that you ultimatley won't need) then I say go for it. Also keep in mind; and I honestly have no knowledge of the subject but if you intend on getting aid for med school wouldn't the pay increase as an RN effect that without really being enough to get you through? Again I have no idea how that works, just thought I'd mention it. Good Luck to you!
     

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