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gorrillaunit18

What is the difference between these? Also, what schools are considered in each?
 

AmpedUp

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In my opinion, the tier classification is trash but whatever.

I can't say what is in each group, but in Tier 1 there's Harvard, Yale, UPenn, Stanford, UC Berkeley etc.

The school I go to is either Tier 3 or 4. It changes every year, so I don't even know what the heck it is. IMO it's something to be taken with a grain of salt. The best school is the one you're most comfortable with.
 
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Its a ranking system of non-profit universities...I believe it's based on endowment, but I'm not sure. Ivy league is just the oldest universities, but they're typically top 10 ranked.

FYI..not sure about med school, but dental school is all about the numbers...they just want to see high gpa, dat and overall well rounded app...where you went and what you majored in aren't usually factored into the admittance equation
 

r2thekesh

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If you look at where people were accepted from at most dental schools, the majority are from tier 1 schools. if you look at uic dental (which i would assume is a typical state dental school), there are more acceptances from UIUC (tier 1) versus UIC (their own undergrad and a tier 3 undergrad) and other schools. It happens at higher rates too. The acceptance rates for applicants are much higher than at tier 3 and tier 4 schools.

Another general advantage of tier 1 schools includes increased research funding. This is looked for by most d schools (even though many people don't have it when applying).

i do agree though, if you have a 4.0 and 22+ at any school you will get an acceptance somewhere (as long as you aren't interview incompetent). I'm just saying that you can have lower stats at tier 1 schools and still get in.

Notes: I'm a board member at a large pre-dental club and know the majority of applicants from my large undergrad institution. I know the stats at UIC and how upwards of 40-50% of their class comes from tier 1 schools. I used US news and world report to label uic undergrad as a tier 3 school
 

Vicviper

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Realistically, as long as you have a decent GPA and DAT score, it doesn't matter where you went to undergrad. A large portion of my dental school class are from small liberal arts schools, and I don't think they were at any disadvantage from those of us who went to UC schools who are supposedly higher tier. A few months ago there was a huge flame war about how a GPA from a supposedly "better" school could be lower than one from a "worse" school, and with lower stats they could get in to dental school more easily - this is a load of crock. The reason that the "higher tier" schools have larger acceptance rates to professional schools is likey that when they decide who to take themselves, they pick the best of the best - the type of people who would do well anywhere, and naturally, they end up doing very well, getting very good scores, and getting into professional school. Now, if you go to a school that has a very strict bell curve, and is incredibly competitive, this could possibly go to partially explain why you had a few less A's than B's, but it's not a very good excuse, and the DAT is the great equalizer in all cases.

The main difference between schools are the opportunities given at those schools, I know for example that I had a much easier time getting into a research program at UCI than I would have had if I went to Cal State Long Beach, but that's just because more research goes on at UCI.
 

baseballjunkie

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Undergrad institution does not matter. I went to a small school very few people have heard of and probably a tier 3 school. I am going to d school with people from Yale and other prestigious schools. Really, it doesn't matter where you do your undergrad as long as you learn the info (shown by your DAT score).

You don't need all 22+ DATs to get into d school if you go to a lower tier school. I had 20s, 21s, and an 18 in bio, with a 3.5 gpa and got into 4 schools.
 

DaveyK

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You guys are being dumb... if a dschool has the option between 2 candidates, equal in every way EXCEPT their undergrad institution... one went to harvard and the other went to some no-nane 4th tier... who do you think the adcoms are going to choose? Also, I feel like this would be even more applicable if you're applying to an ivy dschool, because they would be more prone to care about a school's name...

I'm not saying that dschool is hard to get into... and I'm not saying that it's easier to get into dschool coming from an ivy (in fact, since gpa will likely be harder to maintain, it could actually be more difficult)... but to say that a 4.0 from harvard is no different than a 4.0 from some no-name school is just ridiculous...
 

Vicviper

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You guys are being dumb... if a dschool has the option between 2 candidates, equal in every way EXCEPT their undergrad institution... one went to harvard and the other went to some no-nane 4th tier... who do you think the adcoms are going to choose? Also, I feel like this would be even more applicable if you're applying to an ivy dschool, because they would be more prone to care about a school's name...

I'm not saying that dschool is hard to get into... and I'm not saying that it's easier to get into dschool coming from an ivy (in fact, since gpa will likely be harder to maintain, it could actually be more difficult)... but to say that a 4.0 from harvard is no different than a 4.0 from some no-name school is just ridiculous...
Wow.... well then. To answer your question, they'd both get an interview invite and then the interview will determine which they'll pick. And before we start calling people names, how many dental school Adcom members have you personally asked about this subject? Because for me, that'd be a few.
 

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Wow.... well then. To answer your question, they'd both get an interview invite and then the interview will determine which they'll pick. And before we start calling people names, how many dental school Adcom members have you personally asked about this subject? Because for me, that'd be a few.
I agree but I would presume that an applicant from HYP would get a lot more interviews than one from CSU Northridge. After they get an interview though, it's probably as close to a "level playing field" as one can get.
 
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I could see your interviewer being easily impressed with a big name school. But at the same time, many of us are suckers for our alma mater. I don't think the name of your school is huge, but how can it be a negative thing?

Also, if you go to Harvard undergrad, kudos to you. But an undergrad was in high school when they were accepted. The inflation of high school GPAs is unbelievable. Not to mention the shear amount of people I know personally with perfect SAT scores. I would be more impressed with someone that was accepted into a Harvard grad program than undergrad. BUT a Harvard undergrad probably has some good opportunities for networking that are very valuable in the real world. If someone did go to a top school, it is easier to assume that their classes were thorough..I suppose.
 

Vicviper

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I agree but I would presume that an applicant from HYP would get a lot more interviews than one from CSU Northridge. After they get an interview though, it's probably as close to a "level playing field" as one can get.
Maybe just if taken from the application pool in general, because the population there is on average better off academically, but each case is unique. A person from Yale who gets a 16AA is going to get less interviews than a 21AA from CSUN. As my sister would say, this is a "first year question." (referring to the constant 'what if' questions first year law students ask) Sure, going to Yale is a plus, and looks nice, but will it make a big difference? Maybe it might make a marginally lower GPA be given a shadow of a doubt because of the competition, but in no way would it make up for bad grades. Again, the DAT is the great equalizer.
 
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I went to a top undergrad. My GPA wasn't so great, but I ended up getting 11 interviews (only attended 6 though). At practically every interview I went on, the interviewers commented on how impressed they were with my school. I agree that GPA and DAT are the most important factors, but it helps when your school has a good reputation and a history of success at the grad school in question.
 

Vicviper

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I went to a top undergrad. My GPA wasn't so great, but I ended up getting 11 interviews (only attended 6 though). At practically every interview I went on, the interviewers commented on how impressed they were with my school. I agree that GPA and DAT are the most important factors, but it helps when your school has a good reputation and a history of success at the grad school in question.
Sure, it couldn't hurt, but saying that someone who went to a small liberal arts school is at a distinct disadvantage is a bit of a stretch, which is what some posters earlier on were suggesting.
 

12345a

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Maybe just if taken from the application pool in general, because the population there is on average better off academically, but each case is unique. A person from Yale who gets a 16AA is going to get less interviews than a 21AA from CSUN. As my sister would say, this is a "first year question." (referring to the constant 'what if' questions first year law students ask) Sure, going to Yale is a plus, and looks nice, but will it make a big difference? Maybe it might make a marginally lower GPA be given a shadow of a doubt because of the competition, but in no way would it make up for bad grades. Again, the DAT is the great equalizer.
Yeah, I was assuming that GPA/DAT/EC's/ect were equivalent for "big-name" and "not-so-big-name name" school applicant. That would be the only way to see if the name of the university matters. If stats are different then it's a crapshoot and the name of the school would clearly matter less than the pertinent information that adcoms have about the student.
 

Vicviper

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Yeah, I was assuming that GPA/DAT/EC's/ect were equivalent for "big-name" and "not-so-big-name name" school applicant. That would be the only way to see if the name of the university matters. If stats are different then it's a crapshoot and the name of the school would clearly matter less than the pertinent information that adcoms have about the student.
Yes, definitely. Like I was saying before, you'll never have two identical students, so, for all practical purposes, there's no significant differences. At this point, it's really moot, but, if somehow, you had two identical twins who look exactly the same, have the same personal statement, same EC's, same experiences, same grades, same classes, were asked the same exact questions during interviews by the same interviewers, giving the same exact answers in the same tone of voice and inflection with the same body language, but the only difference was that one was from Yale, and one was from CSUN, I might concede that the person from Yale would stand a better chance, but I think I'd still be on the fence about it, hahaha. ;p
 

12345a

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Like I was saying before, you'll never have two identical students, so, for all practical purposes, there's no significant differences. At this point, it's really moot, but, if somehow..
Good point, can't really argue with that. :p
 

AmpedUp

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Wow.... well then. To answer your question, they'd both get an interview invite and then the interview will determine which they'll pick. And before we start calling people names, how many dental school Adcom members have you personally asked about this subject? Because for me, that'd be a few.
Good post! This is true.

I personally know a Dartmouth grad who is trying to get into medical school. He has a 3.8 GPA and 40 MCAT in Chemistry and Biology and very good EC's. However, every time he goes to interviews, he screws up...One of the most arrogant people I know with poor self-control (can't control self-comparisons with other ppl e.g. talking about how good he is and how dumb people are at McDonalds/Starbucks). He told me he got into a heated argument with one of his interviewers and was kicked out. Dude though he was invincible. Goes to show you that numbers aren't the end-all and be-all.

Someone with the same exact numbers and amount of experience will not be judged on the school they attended rather their personal judge and character (through the interview).
 
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