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i had trouble finding exactly what i was looking for, so im going to just ask:)

i figure med school is hard, but how much does it consume your life? like... is it normal for people to study every fri and sat nights? or is like most weekends free?

How bout social lives, i heard its kind of like high school, where cliques form. But is it generally easy to meet ppl and make new friends? or are ppl generally too busy to socialize and too busy to hang out other than maybe study together?

any personal input would be awesome. thanks alot!
 

Narmerguy

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You really had trouble finding this?
 

justdoit31

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I am one of the med students who don't go to class and just listen to the lectures online... I usually study about 5-6 hours a day and bump that up more when tests roll around (usually 8-10 hours before an exam). There are some Fri/Sat nights where I don't do any school but we have tests on Monday mornings so the weekend before an exam I usually am studying. Though there are some married students in my class who say every Friday is a date night and just study hard and take the evening off (I study better in the evenings)

There are some units that are more challenging than others- in Anatomy I went to class and lab from 8-noon each day then studied from 2-8pm pretty much every day going later before tests. Now in Physiology it is less. The last weekend before an exam I actually spent over half the weekend at a gym watching a volleyball tournament (my former coach and some of my teammates who now coach were in town) and still did fine on the exam.

I do several social things- Bible Study, Free Clinic, play pool with friends, etc. You will learn how to prioritize and study more efficiently. Also what seems like a lot of work when you start med school will slowly become less of a challenge but I have heard MSII cranks up speed.
 

Bartelby

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You should absolutely be able to take Friday and Saturday nights off if there is not a test coming up (and you want to take them off).

You can also adjust your time spent studying/doing other things by adjusting your grade expectations. It still takes significant work to "just pass," but if you are aiming to be at the top of your class you will probably have to make major lifestyle sacrifices for a couple of years.

I would usually go to class 8-noon, then take a break for lunch, study for the afternoon, jog/eat dinner/watch TV, and study a little more at night. It varied depending on what else I was doing, and I didn't stick to any tight schedule. I usually didn't do much on Saturdays at all unless there was a test the next week.

Now that I am in step 1 study mode I am pretty much working around the clock. For the past 2.5 months I basically see my girlfriend a few evenings a week and, other than that, work, eat, and sleep.
 

searun

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Several times each month I will drag my sorry butt into my apartment at 4am or 5am and collapse onto my unmade bed. And, no, I was not studying all night at the library.
 

UTMBstudent

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I very rarely study on Friday or Saturday (only the weekend before a test.)

I average about an hour of studying per day and 3-4 hours of class/lab per day. So 4-5 hours per day is a lot better than working full time. The work itself is no more challenging than undergrad but there is a little more of it.

Hoping second year doesn't get harder!
 

PSUtoMD

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I very rarely study on Friday or Saturday (only the weekend before a test.)

I average about an hour of studying per day and 3-4 hours of class/lab per day. So 4-5 hours per day is a lot better than working full time. The work itself is no more challenging than undergrad but there is a little more of it.

Hoping second year doesn't get harder!


Premeds should not that this would be an exception to the rule (UTMB is either a savant or a liar).

You don't have to slave away every hour of the day, but precious few of you should plan on getting by (read: passing) with this little effort.
 

UTMBstudent

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Premeds should not that this would be an exception to the rule (UTMB is either a savant or a liar).

You don't have to slave away every hour of the day, but precious few of you should plan on getting by (read: passing) with this little effort.
I've talked to a few people at my school that say they study and spend less time on school than they did in undergrad.

Again, second year may take more time. I've heard from many that it does require a little more studying.
 

PSUtoMD

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I've talked to a few people at my school that say they study and spend less time on school than they did in undergrad.

Again, second year may take more time. I've heard from many that it does require a little more studying.

I'd be very curious to know what your curriculum is like. I have never met anyone (at my school or otherwise) who said they spent less time (or even the same amount of time) studying in medical school vs. undergrad.

And yes, second year requires more time.
 

45408

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I'd be very curious to know what your curriculum is like. I have never met anyone (at my school or otherwise) who said they spent less time (or even the same amount of time) studying in medical school vs. undergrad.

And yes, second year requires more time.
A few people swore to me that they studied less during M1/M2 than in college, but 90% of my class said they were studying much more. I definitely did. The most I ever studied for one exam in college was ~30-35 hours. That was the low end of any exam in med school.
 

amine2086

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i had trouble finding exactly what i was looking for, so im going to just ask:)

i figure med school is hard, but how much does it consume your life? like... is it normal for people to study every fri and sat nights? or is like most weekends free?

How bout social lives, i heard its kind of like high school, where cliques form. But is it generally easy to meet ppl and make new friends? or are ppl generally too busy to socialize and too busy to hang out other than maybe study together?

any personal input would be awesome. thanks alot!
I think the answer to this question totally depends on the student. Some students are quick learner and do great with relatively less studying. For most people, they have to treat medical school like a full time job (40+ hours a week) to succeed.
 

psipsina

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A few people swore to me that they studied less during M1/M2 than in college, but 90% of my class said they were studying much more. I definitely did. The most I ever studied for one exam in college was ~30-35 hours. That was the low end of any exam in med school.
Agreed. I know a handful of people who can pull off "cramming" in medschool . . . and by cramming I mean only really studying 2 weeks before the exam instead of 6-8 weeks like everyone else. They are the type of people who can read a detailed science textbook once and tell you what page number they talked about X in addition to every detail they read about.

For most of us mere mortals it takes alot of hard work and a significant time commitment. For the first two years its reasonable to keep up outside relationships and hobbies. For third year I've found its a struggle at times. I'm just finishing off my surgical block and I really haven't done much but surgery, studying and sleeping for 3 months (I *lucked* out and got some super intense rotations).
 

45408

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Yes, and there's a thread about their predecessors:

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=711037
Negative, ghostrider, the pattern is full.

There was one (1) class in which people were bragging about not studying at all, and that was our health policy class that had a handful of lectures and one single exam. I can't think of another time when people said they hadn't studied at all.
 

mcgyver

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you get swamped --> freak out --> you get used to it

a couple of evenings up definitely doable after you've learned to prioritize your time.
 

PSUtoMD

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Negative, ghostrider, the pattern is full.

There was one (1) class in which people were bragging about not studying at all, and that was our health policy class that had a handful of lectures and one single exam. I can't think of another time when people said they hadn't studied at all.

My point was simply that the people who talk about how little they study in medical school (which, from the sound of your first post, included several people over the course of two years) tend to be the same ones who bragged about never studying at all in undergrad.

[and I realize "predecessors" was the wrong word in that post]
 

sleepy425

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as a few others have said, there are a variety of factors that go into it. obviously, some people have to study more than others. In my class, it ranges from people who study maybe 6-7 hrs per day virtually every day leading up to the exam (they ramp it up the week before the exam too), to people who just watch lectures and then only start studying outside of class the week of the exam. You'll figure out what you need to do, and you'll make it happen.

Also, it depends on the school and the curriculum. My school makes virtually everything really easy on us. The curriculum is structured such that we're taking easy classes while we're taking our hard classes, so we can take a longer time with the harder classes. That makes it feel like it's a lot less material because it's covered over a longer period of time. Most of our exams have a team component, so up to 25% of your grade is determined by your team's score (which is almost always near 100%). One exam was entirely a team exam (it was a lot of fun!). We also only have large exams, no quizzes, so we're allowed to learn at our own pace (which is wonderful!!).

I feel like most of our class goes out a reasonable amount. When we're more than 2 weeks away from an exam, I'd say we average going out/doing something fun 2-4 nights per week (depending on the person). When we're 2 weeks away, it starts dwindling, so maybe 1 night in the second to last week before the exam, and then we focus during the week of the exam. And then cycle continues.
 

armybound

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We had "welcome weekend" with our MS0s last weekend and we talked to them about free time.

Bottom line, you WILL have free time, except right before exams. How much you have depends on how efficiently you work and the grades you're hoping to earn. Like all of the other med students here, I will study anywhere from 0-6 hours per day up to ~1 week before exams, then it ramps up to 6-12 hours/day right before exams. During the time before exams I'll go to the bar maybe once or twice per week, play a bunch of video games (at least an hour a day), watch movies, visit my wife... whatever I feel like doing. You will be behind on lecture, and you'll have to make the effort on the weekends to try to catch up, but it won't consume your entire weekend.

Not only do you have free time, but in my opinion it is crucial that you use that free time. I studied every day for just one block and was burned out. You can't do that to yourself. You have to find a way to stay sane.