Yun Stun

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There were a few similiar threads like this one but nothing that answered my questions exactly

I understand that OMFS residency is hard, but how hard is it really? Especially if you choose the the 4 year option. I also want to know what kind of hours do residents put in? And what type of hours to surgeons have after they graduate?

I also know oral surgeons make a really good living, but why is there such a discrepancy about their pay? How could there be such a wide range of numbers from 200k to 500k+ to 1 mill? Or rather why are there some surgeons who make five times as others?

I also want to know the percentages of residents that go to different areas such as trauma, plastic surgery etc... How many choose to go to private practice rather than hospitals. And what are some of the expenses associated with buying in or starting your own practice?

Thanks in advance.
 

brycethefatty

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There were a few similiar threads like this one but nothing that answered my questions exactly

I understand that OMFS residency is hard, but how hard is it really? Especially if you choose the the 4 year option. I also want to know what kind of hours do residents put in? And what type of hours to surgeons have after they graduate?
It's hard to answer this question since programs vary in their intensity and scope. The best way to answer this question is for you to complete an externship. During an externship, you go to an OMFS program an observe residents and maybe pull some teeth or hold some retractors in the OR. This is typically done during your 2 or 3rd year of dental school. For a good perspective, I would recommend trying to go for one month straight and take call every night (or as many nights as you can). Two weeks is good, but a month helps put things in perspective. Also, go visit an oral surgeon and hang around their office for a couple days. Just watch, and ask questions when you are invited to ask questions. But talk to several different oral surgeons -- this will give you a better perspective.


I also know oral surgeons make a really good living, but why is there such a discrepancy about their pay? How could there be such a wide range of numbers from 200k to 500k+ to 1 mill? Or rather why are there some surgeons who make five times as others?
I will leave Jesus Christ to answer this one, because only He can fully understand your question.

I also want to know the percentages of residents that go to different areas such as trauma, plastic surgery etc... How many choose to go to private practice rather than hospitals.
I don't know the percentages. The minority of oral surgeons work in a hospital setting as their primary workplace. All I can say is the opportunity is there for you if you choose work in a hospital setting want to. A fellowship can be completed after a residency to specialize in plastics, cancer, trauma, etc. These fellowships are 1 to 2 years in length. The vast majority go into private practice. Even in private practice you can spend some time doing hospital cases.

Thanks in advance.
I appreciate your gratitude. However, I doubt my answer was all that helpful.
 
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Yun Stun

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sorry for the confusion, but my question regarding pay can be phrased like this: On these forums there is a wide range of pay scale, from anywhere close to 200 to over a million a year:eek:; On all of the salary websites, the number is around 200k. I want to know what determines the overall pay of the oral surgeon, how can there be some who make five times as much as others? Is it because the surgeon making 200k sucks and has a large insurance? The same question could be regarded to almost any health profession, why do all of the salary info websites law ball doctors income?

Of course asking a few oral surgeons, about the day, work hours and salary would be much more beneficial, but I don't know any... so maybe someone here could help
 

reapply2007

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It seems likely that the typical procedure performed by an oral surgeon involves a different level of billing than a "typical" restoration done with composite or amalgam. Oral surgeons are also very, very fast. With more payment per procedure and greater speed of procedures oral surgeons generate more pay, versus higher malpractice risk/patient management complexities. This doesn't consider other forms of overhead into the equation. This type of practice and stressors are definitely not for everyone.
 

servitup

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The salary websites are low b/c they typically only represent employees and not business owners. So people straight out of residency are making around 200K (actually this figure is lowered by the fact that benefits are not included in it on most websites and also there are part-timers dragging down the average).
 

toothfairy85

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sorry for the confusion, but my question regarding pay can be phrased like this: On these forums there is a wide range of pay scale, from anywhere close to 200 to over a million a year:eek:; On all of the salary websites, the number is around 200k. I want to know what determines the overall pay of the oral surgeon, how can there be some who make five times as much as others? Is it because the surgeon making 200k sucks and has a large insurance? The same question could be regarded to almost any health profession, why do all of the salary info websites law ball doctors income?

Of course asking a few oral surgeons, about the day, work hours and salary would be much more beneficial, but I don't know any... so maybe someone here could help
As someone already said, the numbers on the salary websites reflect employees and not business owners. No matter what field of dentistry you go in, your salary will reflect location, patient population and demographics, number of competing practices, insurance reimbursements (especially in oral surgery), hours, treatment fees, overhead, etc.
 

gryffindor

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You can have 2 oral surgeons in the same town, they both do good work and get paid similarly for various OMS procedures. One chooses to work 2 days a week, maybe she has 3 kids under age 5 and only wants to work part-time right now to be with the kids more. The other chooses to work 6 days a week, maybe he has astronomical student loan repayments from that private dental school and private med school from residency and wants to pay it down. Most likely, they will be taking home different amounts of money just based on the amount of hours each one works. Not all surgeons work the same amount, there is no rule that says you have to work 40 hours/week in order for your salary to "count." The salary discrepancies reported are also from employee vs. business owner which others have mentioned.
 

brycethefatty

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Of course asking a few oral surgeons, about the day, work hours and salary would be much more beneficial, but I don't know any... so maybe someone here could help
Just open the phone book and start calling. That's pretty much what I did back in high school and college and most were very nice. Some politely told me they didn't have the time to mentor me, so I moved on. But you can find someone out there to help you. Also, if you know a general dentist or are close to a dental school, those are two other ways you can find an oral surgeon. Ask you general dentist if they know an oral surgeon.