Transferring from a community college to another in another state.

Aug 9, 2013
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Pre-Medical
Hi.

I have recently finished my third semester at a community college, and my GPA is not really that good, a 2.86. However, the past first year has not been the greatest, dealing with depression and family problems, and long story short, I will be moving to another state after my fourth semester ends. I live in Arizona and will move to Los Angeles.

My question is, since my GPA is way too low to get accepted to any 4 year university in Cali, especially UCLA, and since I would have already done 2 years of college before moving, what should I do? I will finish my associate degree next semester, and I have developed great study skills, so I am determined to get straight A's, which will bring me up to a 3.2. The question is, what exactly should I do? Should I attend a community college in LA? That's what I plan to do, but does that mean I will have to retake every single class, since it is a different state and the credits might not be transferrable? Or will I only need to only take certain classes, get good grades, and then transfer to UCLA?

I am really stressed and worried about this, and any comments and feedback would be much appreciated.

Thank you!
 

wades

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Dec 27, 2008
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Im not sure if i'm interpreting your post correctly, but for the University admissions I suggest you speak with your school counselors and possibly even admission representatives from the schools you are interested in. Based on the advice you get from the admission counselors you can better determine the answer to your first question (or if any sdners know the ins and outs of UCLA undergrad admissions they can chyme in). A lot of schools transfer credits between states from community colleges, all of mine transferred. I think it depends on the courses and institution, most of the time schools will do an evaluation of the courses you want to transfer in and let you know if you can receive credit for them or not.

I think the main thing would be to find out the admission requirements for the undergrad universities you are interested in and how your stats/ application compares (IMO undergrad admissions is a bit more clear cut than med school admissions) so that should provide a lot of clarity in deciding your next steps

Good luck!
 
Oct 22, 2013
18
5
Status
Pre-Medical
Hi.

I have recently finished my third semester at a community college, and my GPA is not really that good, a 2.86. However, the past first year has not been the greatest, dealing with depression and family problems, and long story short, I will be moving to another state after my fourth semester ends. I live in Arizona and will move to Los Angeles.

My question is, since my GPA is way too low to get accepted to any 4 year university in Cali, especially UCLA, and since I would have already done 2 years of college before moving, what should I do? I will finish my associate degree next semester, and I have developed great study skills, so I am determined to get straight A's, which will bring me up to a 3.2. The question is, what exactly should I do? Should I attend a community college in LA? That's what I plan to do, but does that mean I will have to retake every single class, since it is a different state and the credits might not be transferrable? Or will I only need to only take certain classes, get good grades, and then transfer to UCLA?

I am really stressed and worried about this, and any comments and feedback would be much appreciated.

Thank you!
Hi

I transferred from a community college in CA to UCLA. Majored in psych. Right now, you need to establish CA residency, as atm your chances of getting into UCLA as a non resident with that GPA are very low, unless you have an amazing personal statement or something.

You'll have to bring up your GPA definitely. Acceptance also hinges on what you plan to choose as your major. Something like communications, psychology, or business Econ are incredibly difficult to transfer into unless you have amazing grades as a transfer (think 3.5 +).

Ucla is incredibly difficult to get into, and they take few out of staters. Right now your best bet is to work on your grades and establish CA residency (I'm not sure of the steps one takes to do that). Even then, you may need to think of another university. They also don't like when people transfer in with too many units. My cc was semester based, so I had to have 90 transferable units, anything above 120 is pushing it, if I remember correctly.

In terms of retaking classes, you may need to speak with one of the cc transfer counselor's as they'll be able to tell you what counts and what won't count.

Good luck!
 

Catalystik

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Sep 4, 2006
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Hi.

I have recently finished my third semester at a community college, and my GPA is not really that good, a 2.86. However, the past first year has not been the greatest, dealing with depression and family problems, and long story short, I will be moving to another state after my fourth semester ends. I live in Arizona and will move to Los Angeles.

My question is, since my GPA is way too low to get accepted to any 4 year university in Cali, especially UCLA, and since I would have already done 2 years of college before moving, what should I do? I will finish my associate degree next semester, and I have developed great study skills, so I am determined to get straight A's, which will bring me up to a 3.2. The question is, what exactly should I do? Should I attend a community college in LA? That's what I plan to do, but does that mean I will have to retake every single class, since it is a different state and the credits might not be transferrable? Or will I only need to only take certain classes, get good grades, and then transfer to UCLA?

I am really stressed and worried about this, and any comments and feedback would be much appreciated.

Thank you!
Why not stay in Arizona where you already qualify for in-state tuition, probably have a better chance of acceptance to a four-year school, and where your credits will transfer with fewer problems? I would add that it's easier to get into Arizona med schools with competitive stats. About 2/3 of California residents have to leave the state for med school since there aren't enough seats for them. And this includes applicants with amazing numbers and ECs.
 

BamaNicole

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Nov 12, 2012
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Someone please correct me if I'm wrong but you need a 3.0 at least to get your application read by a UC application reader.

My advice is to move to CA if you're dead set on going to UCLA and wait a year to go to a community so you can establish residency. You may need a couple of more years of classes at a CC to get your GPA up. You will need at least a 3.5+ like someone else said to get into UCLA. I was out of state and came to CA to start over at a CC. You have some work ahead of you but you could possibly do it if you work hard.
 

MDforMee

Sweet Cheeks
Aug 29, 2012
791
150
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Pre-Medical
I transferred into UCLA from a California community college.

I had a rough first few years in community college, where I moved around a lot, worked, and basically had a difficult life. See me cleaning up the wreckage that I had to deal with, here:
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/got-an-a-the-first-time-retook-and-got-a-d-which-grade-counts.1047867/

But, when I finally became established with a good place to live, positive friends, and a career direction, I turned things around and did pretty well. It's not impossible to get into UCLA, but with a lot of hard work, you can. I'm just not sure if you're ready -- academically -- to make that transition. The kids there just study all the time. See my post about it, here:
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/question-about-gpa-and-notorious-grade-deflation.1047482/page-2#post-14747230

I made it out of UCLA with a good GPA in a hard science, as well.

I don't think that you should be setting your sights on just UCLA; you should be looking at schools that are more realistic for you, unless you're willing to do what I did, which is literally sacrifice years and time for something not a lot of other people would.