Typed or hand-written Thank-you's

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by aprilpremed, Oct 13, 2001.

  1. aprilpremed

    aprilpremed Junior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2001
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    What's the consensus on thank-you note formats? Typed like a business letter or short and handwritten (like a card)?

    Thanks!

    April
     
  2. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo IEatShavedPussyCats

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2001
    Messages:
    3,797
    Likes Received:
    1
    Email...
    Or Handwritten...I always think typing a thank you "NOTE" looks a little weird. Especially if it's only a few sentences. After all, it's a NOTE...not a letter :)
     
  4. THE instiGATOR

    THE instiGATOR Cow Tipper

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2001
    Messages:
    1,626
    Likes Received:
    5
    My letters were typed and very personalized. For example, one of my interviewers, a 4th year, let me know where he was going to do his residency. I made a point to write this down at a later time and address it in the letter. I wasn't kissing butt, just trying to show that I was attentive. I also sent a letter to the individual who coordinated the interviews (she probably deserved one the most). All of my letters were on quality paper. I advise you to keep everything professional. Even at this stage, you are trying to win brownie points.
     
  5. jargon124

    jargon124 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2001
    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    3
    I think thank you notes should be handwritten - pretty much without exception. Their purpose is simply to express thanks, not to show how "professional" you are. In order to do that you've got to make it personal. Word processing is anything but personal, irrespective of content. Besides, the note should not be more than a few sentences anyway...handwrite it and forget if you ask me...
     
  6. none

    none 1K Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2001
    Messages:
    1,903
    Likes Received:
    5
    If it's a note (and it should be!) then hand-write. If you find some amazing reason to send them an actual letter, then type it.
     
  7. racergirl

    racergirl Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2001
    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    23
    I really think it's up to you. I typed mine because I have horrible handwriting, and I tend to transpose letters even when I'm being "careful." I handwrote the envelope though...
     
  8. Jessica

    Jessica Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2001
    Messages:
    587
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would have to agree that handwritten is much more personal, and shows that you are thoughtful. Unless your handwriting is SO bad that it is completely illegible, I would avoid word-processing.
     
  9. racergirl

    racergirl Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2001
    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    23
    Seesh, whatever. OK you're right--I've completely blown my chances because I typed a thankyou note. How impersonal, cold and unthoughtful of me. I am clearly a horrible person! How foolish of me not to realize that typing a note to avoid my poor writing was actually A WINDOW INTO MY HEARTLESS SOUL.

    My cover's been blown. Might as well pack it in and withdraw my application!

    Really you guys, I don't think it's that big a deal. If I don't get into this school, I doubt it's because I typed a thank you note!
     
  10. Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo IEatShavedPussyCats

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2001
    Messages:
    3,797
    Likes Received:
    1
    Yea...well I try to email whenever possible. Still, I found myself struggling when I was handwriting my thank you notes to the people for my second interview. I have been told numerous times by people who read my notes or anything that I chose the right profession based on my writing legibility alone! I guess all I do is type now. I kept switching between printing and handwriting. Ah well, if I don't get in...I'll blame it on the handwriting because they probably thought "thank you" was "#$%K you". Reject pile for scooby! :)
     
  11. sandflea

    sandflea Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2001
    Messages:
    791
    Likes Received:
    1
    well, ANY thank-you note--typed, handwritten, emailed, whatever--is better than none at all.

    that said, i was always advised to type it--both by my premed advisor and physicians i know who interview candidates, because handwritten is just too casual. think about it: if you were interviewing for a job (which is kind of like what this is), would you send a handwritten note, or would you want to look a little more professional (and looking put together can never hurt)? if this process was really something that valued casualness, we wouldn't have to endure the formalities of AMCAS, we wouldn't have to interview, we woudln't be expected to wear suits, etc, etc. we're not trying to show how warm-hearted and thoughtful we are--the thank-you is a professional formality. so i've typed my thank-you notes. i never thought about using email--that's actually a good idea, considering i'm afraid my mailed ones won't make it into my file in time.

    then again, racergirl is right: your thank you note isn't going to be what keeps you from being accepted. again, sending ANY kind of thank you is better than nothing at all. so it's really up to you. i'm sticking with typed.
     
  12. kobe8

    kobe8 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2001
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    There should not even be any debate about this. Unless it is email always hand-write the thank you letter. It is more personal and sincere. Typing it should not even be a thought. ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;)
     
  13. kobe8

    kobe8 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2001
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have been working in industry (Biomedical Engineering) for a few years now and while sometimes it is appropriate to type a letter, a medschool interview thank you letter is "definitely" not the time. Sure, it is not necessary, but it is proper.
     
  14. eiiza6eth

    eiiza6eth Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2004
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    1
    I interviewed today at one school that gave us the addresses of our interviewers and implied that we should write thank you notes to them. Because writing is a professional gesture, are the simple, generic cards from a boxed set more appropriate than a Dr. Suess thank you card for a pediatrician, for example?
     
  15. kc123

    kc123 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    0

    I don't see how you can go wrong with a typed thank-you. I have asked people for advice on this (family and friends)....most said to type it. It is professional. If you interviewed for a job, no one would say a typed thank-you note was inappropriate. Just my two cents. I don't think there is anything wrong with hand-writing....but still don't think you can go wrong w/ a typed note.
     
  16. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  17. dr_pepper

    dr_pepper Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2004
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Traditionalists may be offended by anything but a hand-written note. Cover your bases and write it out.
     
  18. BraneDoc

    BraneDoc Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2004
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    0
    Am I the only one who noticed that this thread was revived after spending over 3 years (!) in oblivion? And (to make my post somewhat relevant), I'd say hand write the thank-you notes.
     
  19. Ambs

    Ambs Sleeping is underrated!

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2004
    Messages:
    959
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    LOL, I didn't notice until you pointed out that the thread dates back to '01.

    I think they should be hand-written. :thumbup:
     
  20. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
    Physician Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    31,005
    Likes Received:
    9,859
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    A thank you note is just a common courtesy, not a part of your application. You should send them typed, handwritten or via email, and in business letter form, card form or whatever. It really doesn't matter what form they take, and it won't make or break your application either way (unless your spelling and grammer are truly horrendous).
    Unless your handwriting is very good (which I think may be rare among male premeds), I would type them. I usually only use email if a person has specifically given me their email address to follow up with them if I had further questions.
     
  21. RangerD

    RangerD Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2003
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]

    I think Law2Doc has hit the nail on the head. Any form is better than nothing. If handwriting is not great, typing is better. Email only if given the okay first because some people like email and others don't.

    Personally, I type followup letters. I think it is best to keep it professional and formal. It is the same as applying for a professional job. If our handwriting is not beautiful script, it may give the impression that we are sloppy.
     
  22. biendesalud

    biendesalud SDN Angel

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    For three interviews I hand wrote two sets of thank you cards (and delivered them before I left the campus) and sent one set via e-mail. I was accepted to the two schools that got hand written notes and wait-listed at the other. This, I'm sure, is a minor part of their decision making process, but every little bit helps. FYI I have horrible handwriting, but I do my best to make it look decent.
     
  23. OSUdoc08

    OSUdoc08 Banned
    Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Messages:
    7,698
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Medical Student
    You don't need to send thank you cards. It is a waste of time and does not affect your admission standing.
     
  24. Geronimo

    Geronimo Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    Messages:
    646
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hand written!
     
  25. dr.z

    Physician

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4,096
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I hand wrote a short thank you card to admissions office.
     
  26. jmv1083

    jmv1083 J-E-T-S-Jets-Jets-Jets!

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    At one school I interviewed at, the Assistant Director of Admissions stated explicitly that thank you notes do not make any difference.

    From my experience so far, I don't think thank you notes count for much and here's why:

    School A - Only the second school I interviewed at. Forgot to send notes for about a month, which probably didn't look good. Accepted 2 months later.
    School B - Mailed notes 7 days after interviewing. Received acceptance email that afternoon. There's no way that the notes were received before the decision was made.
    School C - Forgot the names of my interviewers. Didn't feel like calling the office to find out. Never sent thank you notes. Accepted 6 weeks after interview.

    So if you can be accepted without even sending thank you notes to your interviewers, then I doubt it matters even a little whether the notes are typed or handwritten.
     
  27. PreMedAdAG

    PreMedAdAG I am so smart. S-M-R-T :)

    Joined:
    May 16, 2002
    Messages:
    1,104
    Likes Received:
    7
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    :rolleyes:
    Way to be totally rude
     
  28. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
    Physician Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    31,005
    Likes Received:
    9,859
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Once again, it is not a part of the admissions process, it is common courtesy. Not everything you do in life has to be evaluated to see if it affects admissions -- some things you just do because it's the socially accepted thing to do.
     

Share This Page