Jan 25, 2013
92
1
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I just got my acceptance email from CHS today. I am so excited! UCLA's my #1.

Anyone else out there ready to be a Bruin this fall?? What scholarships/fellowships have people gotten?

They offered me $10,000 University fellowship for the first year. The agreement says if I got a Graduate Researcher position it might affect the fellowship. Any thoughts on how to fill the gap then? Just loans?

I'm planning to go to the March 18 event, if I can get out of work. :naughty:
 
Jan 26, 2013
49
0
Omaha, NE
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
congrats on getting into UCLA MPH! It's one of my top three schools and I've been pretty anxious on waiting for their decision. Is that March 18 event an admitted student's day/info session?
 
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Jan 25, 2013
92
1
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Quick question... I saw some folks were assigned faculty advisors. I didn't read that I had one. Any thoughts on why some were assigned and others weren't? I mentioned a few different folks in my personal statement.
 
Feb 23, 2013
2
0
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Hello, I have also recently been admitted to UCLA for an MPH in CHS, and I'm having such a difficult time deciding between schools. I really like the CHS curriculum but would love to learn more about the program. May I ask what made UCLA your #1 choice?

Anyone else who has experience with the CHS program or the Fielding School of Public Health (classes, research opportunities, helpfulness of professors, career services, jobs upon graduation, living in the UCLA area), please feel free to chime in! Thanks in advance!
 
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Hello, I have also recently been admitted to UCLA for an MPH in CHS, and I'm having such a difficult time deciding between schools. I really like the CHS curriculum but would love to learn more about the program. May I ask what made UCLA your #1 choice?

Anyone else who has experience with the CHS program or the Fielding School of Public Health (classes, research opportunities, helpfulness of professors, career services, jobs upon graduation, living in the UCLA area), please feel free to chime in! Thanks in advance!
My two cents with a few caveats: I have been accepted to UCLA's health policy program, but it is not actually my top choice. Also, I am originally from L.A., so I may be biased. Though I have not lived in the area for some time, I travel there frequently, as my family still lives there.

UCLA is an excellent school, particularly in community-based programs. The school is a reflection of the city in that "people of color" or other underserved communities are central to the mission of the university in general and of the public health school in particular. If you are looking at programs with a focus on meeting health disparity at the community level, you cannot go wrong with UCLA.

Westwood is expensive but not impossible. As a graduate student, you will likely live off-campus, like many other graduate students. There may be reasonable rent in the area, but it is not unreasonable to live outside the Westwood area. Whatever the environmental and social implications, a car is highly recommended - though again, doable without if you can manage. (I grew up in L.A., I cannot fathom not having a car in California. Besides, your eventual practicum may be far.) Perhaps you can live in a "cheaper" area, in which case a car is probably needed. In addition, Westwood is a university "town." Like other areas in the country where a large university is located, the university "makes the town." Needless to say, there will be a large contingent of stores, accommodations, etc., that cater specifically to university students. Whether this appeals to you or not, of course it is a personal choice. (If possible, I personally would not live in Westwood only because I prefer to separate my school life from my personal life. Los Angeles is conglomerate, for better or for worse. This also means plenty of choices in which to live specific to your needs.)

I would take a closer look at the curriculum. Is it a good match? Did the program give you a contact person/liaison? (They did with my policy admissions offer.) I also like to take a closer look at the kind of students programs admit - say, students out of undergrad versus students with years of experience or advanced degrees. (This is a personal preference, of course, but for me it matters a great deal.) Is it possible to talk directly to a current student? Is there a Facebook page? (This is how I found a current student in another program.) UCLA and the city will offer plentiful opportunities for the required practicum. Is there a handbook or guide available online that shows where students have done their practicum? (BU has this, for example. I do not mean a list, I mean an actual accounting of "students' perspectives.")

Good luck! :D
 
Feb 23, 2013
2
0
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My two cents with a few caveats: I have been accepted to UCLA's health policy program, but it is not actually my top choice. Also, I am originally from L.A., so I may be biased. Though I have not lived in the area for some time, I travel there frequently, as my family still lives there.

UCLA is an excellent school, particularly in community-based programs. The school is a reflection of the city in that "people of color" or other underserved communities are central to the mission of the university in general and of the public health school in particular. If you are looking at programs with a focus on meeting health disparity at the community level, you cannot go wrong with UCLA.

Westwood is expensive but not impossible. As a graduate student, you will likely live off-campus, like many other graduate students. There may be reasonable rent in the area, but it is not unreasonable to live outside the Westwood area. Whatever the environmental and social implications, a car is highly recommended - though again, doable without if you can manage. (I grew up in L.A., I cannot fathom not having a car in California. Besides, your eventual practicum may be far.) Perhaps you can live in a "cheaper" area, in which case a car is probably needed. In addition, Westwood is a university "town." Like other areas in the country where a large university is located, the university "makes the town." Needless to say, there will be a large contingent of stores, accommodations, etc., that cater specifically to university students. Whether this appeals to you or not, of course it is a personal choice. (If possible, I personally would not live in Westwood only because I prefer to separate my school life from my personal life. Los Angeles is conglomerate, for better or for worse. This also means plenty of choices in which to live specific to your needs.)

I would take a closer look at the curriculum. Is it a good match? Did the program give you a contact person/liaison? (They did with my policy admissions offer.) I also like to take a closer look at the kind of students programs admit - say, students out of undergrad versus students with years of experience or advanced degrees. (This is a personal preference, of course, but for me it matters a great deal.) Is it possible to talk directly to a current student? Is there a Facebook page? (This is how I found a current student in another program.) UCLA and the city will offer plentiful opportunities for the required practicum. Is there a handbook or guide available online that shows where students have done their practicum? (BU has this, for example. I do not mean a list, I mean an actual accounting of "students' perspectives.")

Good luck! :D
Thanks a lot for your helpful response! :)
 
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Jan 25, 2013
92
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Hello, I have also recently been admitted to UCLA for an MPH in CHS, and I'm having such a difficult time deciding between schools. I really like the CHS curriculum but would love to learn more about the program. May I ask what made UCLA your #1 choice?

Anyone else who has experience with the CHS program or the Fielding School of Public Health (classes, research opportunities, helpfulness of professors, career services, jobs upon graduation, living in the UCLA area), please feel free to chime in! Thanks in advance!
Hi! I actually just posted about this on a different thread.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=13726386&posted=1#post13726386

I looked at the curriculum and I found so many courses I'd love to take. I also want to get my CHES certification; their health education/health promotion classes help prepare for it. I spoke briefly with Dr. Kagawa-Singer in the fall and she's involved with so many things in the API community. I think she'd be a great mentor and a helpful connection to career opportunities during grad school and after graduation.

I do have to admit, though, that I'm a born & raised SoCal girl who plans to work here after graduation, so I think convincing me to move somewhere else would take a full ride and a program with a strong emphasis on the API community.
 
Jan 26, 2013
49
0
Omaha, NE
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
So in the excitement of my acceptance to UCLA FSPH, I had assumed that I got accepted into the dept. of EHS to which I had applied. The actual acceptance letter was vague and I never received anything from the actual department, so while looking at the email I had received to check my admission decision, I noticed it said to "contact your department" which listed the mailing address to CHS. :( I sent an email asking for clarification and I'm not upset about the CHS program or anything, but I didn't know a whole about it since I didn't really look into applying to other programs beside EHS.


EDIT: to be specific the letter just said this"
to check your decision status. If you have any questions about the
decision, please contact your department directly at:

Public Health
A1-269 CHS
Box 951772
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772
(310) 825-5524"

I may just be overreacting, but isn't that just the mailing address to the school of public health in general? I guess I saw CHS and was confused.
 
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Oct 28, 2009
19
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
So in the excitement of my acceptance to UCLA FSPH, I had assumed that I got accepted into the dept. of EHS to which I had applied. The actual acceptance letter was vague and I never received anything from the actual department, so while looking at the email I had received to check my admission decision, I noticed it said to "contact your department" which listed the mailing address to CHS. :( I sent an email asking for clarification and I'm not upset about the CHS program or anything, but I didn't know a whole about it since I didn't really look into applying to other programs beside EHS.


EDIT: to be specific the letter just said this"
to check your decision status. If you have any questions about the
decision, please contact your department directly at:

Public Health
A1-269 CHS
Box 951772
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772
(310) 825-5524"

I may just be overreacting, but isn't that just the mailing address to the school of public health in general? I guess I saw CHS and was confused.
Don't worry,that's the "Center for Health Sciences" building, which has more than just public health and definitely more than just the Community Health Sciences building. :)
 
Jan 26, 2013
49
0
Omaha, NE
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Don't worry,that's the "Center for Health Sciences" building, which has more than just public health and definitely more than just the Community Health Sciences building. :)
Thanks a lot for the reassurance! I guess I really was just overreacting. I got an official email an hour ago saying that the EHS department accepted. I am so relieved! :)
 
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I am randomly getting excited about UCLA's MPH, even though I have not made a decision. I have not started the UCLA login. Does anyone know if there is a deposit required if you accept the offer?
 
Nov 30, 2012
24
0
Los Angeles, CA
Status
Will anyone that got in for Epi be attending the Admitted Students' Open House? Unfortunately, I will be elsewhere and would really appreciate a general overview or blow-by-blow of the overall experience.
 
Feb 15, 2013
9
0
Status
Non-Student
I applied for UCLA's MS in Health Policy and Management (HPM) program. I submitted in December and haven't heard back. Anyone heard from this department. Looks like CHS is sending notifications but just wanted to see if HPM has sent responses out.
 
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I applied for UCLA's MS in Health Policy and Management (HPM) program. I submitted in December and haven't heard back. Anyone heard from this department. Looks like CHS is sending notifications but just wanted to see if HPM has sent responses out.
I heard about two weeks ago, first from the department and then most recently by the graduate division. Good news :) - MPH though, not MS.

...good luck!
 
Nov 7, 2012
24
0
Status
I applied for UCLA's MS in Health Policy and Management (HPM) program. I submitted in December and haven't heard back. Anyone heard from this department. Looks like CHS is sending notifications but just wanted to see if HPM has sent responses out.
I applied to the HPM PhD and still waiting to hear back too.
 
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Jan 25, 2013
92
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I am randomly getting excited about UCLA's MPH, even though I have not made a decision. I have not started the UCLA login. Does anyone know if there is a deposit required if you accept the offer?
It doesn't specifically state it online.

From URSA Online:

Step 1: Statement of Intent to Register (SIR)
Step 1 officially tells us whether or not you intend to attend UCLA. If you do not intend to attend UCLA, you only complete Step 1. Start and continue with the paw above.

Step 2: Statement of Legal Residence (SLR)
Step 2 requests data that helps determine your California residence status for tuition and fee purposes at UCLA.

Submit Step: Submit Information Requested
Submit Step completes this process by submitting all the information requested from you, in each step above, to UCLA. Once you submit, a confirmation page will indicate your decision to accept your offer of admission to UCLA.

E-mail Step: Official E-mail Selection
E-mail Step allows you to designate your Official E-mail address at UCLA. It is essential that this e-mail account is being read on a regular basis.
 
Oct 10, 2012
45
0
Status
Has anyone found any info about students' experiences at ucla? (i.e., from the mouths of students, not the school)
I'm a bit worried about quality of life/opportunities as a student. My high school friends who went to UCs had so-so experiences -- fighting to get into chain classes, lack of any kind of guidance, basically being an anonymous fish in the ocean. Granted, this was for undergrad, but I can't shake the feeling that they were onto something. While ucla is definitely the wiser financial choice compared to private/out of state MPH programs, it's really only a 20-30% difference in cost in the end. By no means am I implying that an extra 20k isn't something to worry about; I'm just trying to find out if shelling it out will bring a greater ROI down the road.

I hope that made sense. I feel like I've been driving myself crazy trying to solve this. What do you all think?
 
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Jan 25, 2013
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This isn't as official as I'd like, but it looks like there was no fee last year: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=719935
Good news, I'd say!
Great find! Thanks for posting the link to that thread.

I spoke with someone who attended UCLA for undergrad yesterday. She mentioned how UC's make you feel like a number rather than a person. While this isn't the first time I've heard that sentiment, it made me wonder...

Has anyone heard from any MPH students on whether they felt like they were able to get the faculty attention?
 
Oct 10, 2012
45
0
Status
Great find! Thanks for posting the link to that thread.

I spoke with someone who attended UCLA for undergrad yesterday. She mentioned how UC's make you feel like a number rather than a person. While this isn't the first time I've heard that sentiment, it made me wonder...

Has anyone heard from any MPH students on whether they felt like they were able to get the faculty attention?
Glad to help! And your friend hit the nail on the head with her number comment. My big concern, maybe bigger than faculty attention, is the opportunities available to students. How does this differ for grad students vs. undergrads? (I've had the undergrad experience described to me as 'fighting tooth and nail' for research positions, classes, etc. I'm also worried about the resources and connections ucla has compared to those found at private universities who have insane amounts of money being thrown at them. Can anyone chime in on this?
 
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Great find! Thanks for posting the link to that thread.

I spoke with someone who attended UCLA for undergrad yesterday. She mentioned how UC's make you feel like a number rather than a person. While this isn't the first time I've heard that sentiment, it made me wonder...

Has anyone heard from any MPH students on whether they felt like they were able to get the faculty attention?
Glad to help! And your friend hit the nail on the head with her number comment. My big concern, maybe bigger than faculty attention, is the opportunities available to students. How does this differ for grad students vs. undergrads? (I've had the undergrad experience described to me as 'fighting tooth and nail' for research positions, classes, etc. I'm also worried about the resources and connections ucla has compared to those found at private universities who have insane amounts of money being thrown at them. Can anyone chime in on this?
Feeling like a "number" is a common enough complaint or concern. The UCs are huge public institutions. This is particularly true for UCLA and Berkeley. As such, it is not uncommon to feel like resources are stretched among seemingly too many students in universities with ever decreasing resources. That said, UCLA and Berkeley offer excellent opportunities despite the challenges of being such monoliths. While it does not have the endowments that private universities have, both institutions consistently rank high among private universities worldwide. It is rare for public universities to be so highly ranked and well regarded among private universities (which, incidentally, can just as easily offer mediocre training). Institutions churning out MPH students as if through a mill? I have heard the same complaint about Hopkins.

In large universities such as UCLA and Berkeley, one must keep in mind that you are surrounded with many of the brightest, dedicated, and passionate students anywhere, private or public. "Fighting tooth and nail" is part of the deal if you choose to be an institution with a large number of like-minded students. Research and TA positions, also, are rare among masters-level students (though not impossible). Doctoral students are likely to be more favored because this is part of their training. You will get the classes you need, just perhaps not on the day or time you had wished. You have to get the classes you need because you have to graduate. This is not undergraduate studies; in graduate school your classes are almost always carved out for you. There will be nuances. Ok, perhaps that global health course on the Afro-Carribean diaspora in the late 19th century is full. But as a maternal and child health concentrator did you really need that class? You get my point. (Choose methods courses over content-based courses. You will be more marketable.)

I am from SoCal, know UCLA well, and completed grad studies at Stanford. I live in Boston, did my training at Harvard Med, and stayed for postdoctoral fellowship.

UCLA and Berkeley are just as competitive - and quite frankly, more down-to-earth. It's all that sun. :D
 
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Jan 25, 2013
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Feeling like a "number" is a common enough complaint or concern. The UCs are huge public institutions. This is particularly true for UCLA and Berkeley. As such, it is not uncommon to feel like resources are stretched among seemingly too many students in universities with ever decreasing resources. That said, UCLA and Berkeley offer excellent opportunities despite the challenges of being such monoliths. While it does not have the endowments that private universities have, both institutions consistently rank high among private universities worldwide. It is rare for public universities to be so highly ranked and well regarded among private universities (which, incidentally, can just as easily offer mediocre training). Institutions churning out MPH students as if through a mill? I have heard the same complaint about Hopkins.

In large universities such as UCLA and Berkeley, one must keep in mind that you are surrounded with many of the brightest, dedicated, and passionate students anywhere, private or public. "Fighting tooth and nail" is part of the deal if you choose to be an institution with a large number of like-minded students. Research and TA positions, also, are rare among masters-level students (though not impossible). Doctoral students are likely to be more favored because this is part of their training. You will get the classes you need, just perhaps not on the day or time you had wished. You have to get the classes you need because you have to graduate. This is not undergraduate studies; in graduate school your classes are almost always carved out for you. There will be nuances. Ok, perhaps that global health course on the Afro-Carribean diaspora in the late 19th century is full. But as a maternal and child health concentrator did you really need that class? You get my point. (Choose methods courses over content-based courses. You will be more marketable.)

I am from SoCal, know UCLA well, and completed grad studies at Stanford. I live in Boston, did my training at Harvard Med, and stayed for postdoctoral fellowship.

UCLA and Berkeley are just as competitive - and quite frankly, more down-to-earth. It's all that sun. :D
Thank you for the insight!

I already have a long list of electives I'm interested in taking (both methods and population-specific). I'll just have to accept that I won't be able to take all of them.

I'm making a list of questions to ask the current students during Admitted Students Day. Availability of TA/Research positions is definitely on there.
 
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Feeling like a "number" is a common enough complaint or concern. The UCs are huge public institutions. This is particularly true for UCLA and Berkeley. As such, it is not uncommon to feel like resources are stretched among seemingly too many students in universities with ever decreasing resources. That said, UCLA and Berkeley offer excellent opportunities despite the challenges of being such monoliths. While it does not have the endowments that private universities have, both institutions consistently rank high among private universities worldwide. It is rare for public universities to be so highly ranked and well regarded among private universities (which, incidentally, can just as easily offer mediocre training). Institutions churning out MPH students as if through a mill? I have heard the same complaint about Hopkins.

In large universities such as UCLA and Berkeley, one must keep in mind that you are surrounded with many of the brightest, dedicated, and passionate students anywhere, private or public. "Fighting tooth and nail" is part of the deal if you choose to be an institution with a large number of like-minded students. Research and TA positions, also, are rare among masters-level students (though not impossible). Doctoral students are likely to be more favored because this is part of their training. You will get the classes you need, just perhaps not on the day or time you had wished. You have to get the classes you need because you have to graduate. This is not undergraduate studies; in graduate school your classes are almost always carved out for you. There will be nuances. Ok, perhaps that global health course on the Afro-Carribean diaspora in the late 19th century is full. But as a maternal and child health concentrator did you really need that class? You get my point. (Choose methods courses over content-based courses. You will be more marketable.)

I am from SoCal, know UCLA well, and completed grad studies at Stanford. I live in Boston, did my training at Harvard Med, and stayed for postdoctoral fellowship.

UCLA and Berkeley are just as competitive - and quite frankly, more down-to-earth. It's all that sun. :D

I would definitely second this statement. The experiences of undergrad at UCs are very much different from the experiences of graduate students at UCs. Undergrads have been more impacted and they do really have to fight tooth and nail to get into class they *need* to graduate, whereas for graduate students that won't be a problem. I'd second the method over content recommendation, you wont be able to take all the classes you want, but that's not a UC specific problem, that would be a problem anywhere you go because you might have a scheduling conflict, have to work, sleep, eat etc. Also TA/Reader wise both Berkeley and UCLA leave most of those positions to doctoral students since thats how a lot of them get funded but you can also TA for other departments you may have relevant background in like Bio, Chem, Nutrition etc. There are a lot of undergrads so TAs are always needed in some department.

"Fighting tooth and nail" is part of the deal if you choose to be an institution with a large number of like-minded students"-this is also definitely true, your experience at UC (or any where else) is what you make it. People aren't going to go out of their way to make sure you are on track, or are adequately supported but if you are proactive and seek out those relationships they are available. Sure you'll come up against road blocks and it'll be frustrating at times but thats life and if you weren't a determined student you wouldn't have be admitted in the first place.
 
Feb 15, 2013
9
0
Status
Non-Student
Not sure if this will help anyone but I called UCLA admissions today and they said they still have some responses to issue out. They said the delay is because they had over a 1100 applicants. If you haven't received a response yet, is it a sign that you're probably not going to get in?
 
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I just wanted to say kudos to the Dept of Health Policy and Mgmt at UCLA. I asked about opportunities for MPH students to take part in the Center for Health Policy Research and other activities. I received a long-a**, detailed email message from one of the directors, and it was very helpful.

...come on, Cal and Harvard. :D
 
Oct 10, 2012
45
0
Status
I just wanted to say kudos to the Dept of Health Policy and Mgmt at UCLA. I asked about opportunities for MPH students to take part in the Center for Health Policy Research and other activities. I received a long-a**, detailed email message from one of the directors, and it was very helpful.

...come on, Cal and Harvard. :D
That's pretty awesome! On the other hand, I sent an inquiry email to the contact person specified in my acceptance letter - it's been over ten days, and nothing. I'm not sure what to think.
 
Mar 4, 2013
3
0
Status
Other Health Professions Student
congrats all to getting in! This post may be for Masters students but I just wanted to see if there were any admits to UCLA's CHS PhD, hanging out?
 
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It's nice when the assigned faculty liaison outright tells you to come to UCLA. As noted above, I have asked one faculty about the Center for Health Policy Research and another about the BRITE Center. Both responded within 24 hours - and in great detail! UCLA is looking very very attractive right now. ;)
 
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For those who were admitted to UCLA earlier in the cycle, did you receive word on funding (e.g., scholarships, loans, etc.) with or perhaps soon after the official offer letter? I am getting the impression that I will only know about my financial aid situation if I complete the intent to register form online. Thanks in advance! :D
 
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Hi, I was admitted to the PhD program in Health Policy and Management. I got the email a few days ago, but am still waiting for the official Graduate Division offer. I am anxious to find out about funding, as UCLA is my top choice.

Does anyone on this forum who is more familiar with UCLA and their graduate funding know what the stipends and fellowships are like? Thanks in advance.
M.

For those who were admitted to UCLA earlier in the cycle, did you receive word on funding (e.g., scholarships, loans, etc.) with or perhaps soon after the official offer letter? I am getting the impression that I will only know about my financial aid situation if I complete the intent to register form online. Thanks in advance! :D
 
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Jan 25, 2013
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It's nice when the assigned faculty liaison outright tells you to come to UCLA. As noted above, I have asked one faculty about the Center for Health Policy Research and another about the BRITE Center. Both responded within 24 hours - and in great detail! UCLA is looking very very attractive right now. ;)
Nice! I'm going to try to drop by the UCLA/RAND Prevent Research Center before/after the Admitted Students Day event. Still waiting to hear from someone at the BRITE Center, but I just sent the email yesterday.
 
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Jan 25, 2013
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For those who were admitted to UCLA earlier in the cycle, did you receive word on funding (e.g., scholarships, loans, etc.) with or perhaps soon after the official offer letter? I am getting the impression that I will only know about my financial aid situation if I complete the intent to register form online. Thanks in advance! :D
I got word of my University Fellowship in my department acceptance letter.
 
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I am 95% certain I will attend Fielding. Like many of you, I have not heard from Cal. Berkeley would have to give significant financial incentive (which is unlikely) because money aside the UCLA curriculum is a closer match to my interests/goals. I live in the Boston area but grew up in L.A. Going to Fielding would be a kind of coming home. In any case if you have questions about L.A., let me know. I am happy to help. Good luck to everyone! We are at the home stretch. :D
 
Mar 9, 2013
7
0
San Diego, CA
Status
Other Health Professions Student
Finally got my acceptance letter for Fall 2013! Will be attending Admitted Students Day, but still not sure if it's a better fit than NYU. Does anyone know how housing works out for graduate students?
 
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Finally got my acceptance letter for Fall 2013! Will be attending Admitted Students Day, but still not sure if it's a better fit than NYU. Does anyone know how housing works out for graduate students?
There are university apartments designated for graduate students, students with families/partners, etc. It's on the website of Student Affairs. However, I doubt these apartments will cover most graduate students. I suspect many find off-campus housing.
 
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...and off we go! I have decided to accept UCLA's offer. All the best to those still waiting or still deciding. See you there future Bruins! ;)
 
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If you have not completed the intent to register form or are curious about a deposit, there is NO deposit. The online paperwork is timed and gives you 45 min to complete. I used most of this allotted time because it will ask questions for which you may not have the answers right away (e.g., date when you registered your car), though it gives you the option of saving the work and returning to it later.

I feel great with my choice. The faculty liaison assigned to me wants me to contact her again in early summer so that we can collaborate on how best to move forward with my graduate training, such as potential projects. I'm already thinking of asking her to be my advisor.

Good luck!
 
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Jan 25, 2013
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In case anyone was interested, here's the schedule for the Community Health Sciences Department agenda for Monday:

Community Health Sciences Session
2:00 – 3:00 Open Q&A session with Department SAO – Alexis Sexauer
3:00-3:15 Introduction from Department Chair – Dr. Steven Wallace
3:15-3:30 Faculty, Alumni, and current student Introductions
3:30-4:50 Open Reception
4:50-5:00 Closing Remarks – Dr. Steve Wallace

I also scheduled a couple meetings with Dr. Burt Cowgill from the UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center and Roena from the UCLA/KP Center for Health Equity.

Really looking forward to Monday! :love:
 
Jan 26, 2013
49
0
Omaha, NE
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Has anyone received any word on scholarships/fin aid? I know some people received scholarship notice on their letter of acceptance, but if anyone finds out more info from admit day (won't be able to attend), please do post.
 
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Jan 25, 2013
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Has anyone received any word on scholarships/fin aid? I know some people received scholarship notice on their letter of acceptance, but if anyone finds out more info from admit day (won't be able to attend), please do post.
They don't make the financial aid package available until you formally accept. Since they waived the deposit, technically you could go ahead and accept just to see the package...
 
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can anyone who was able to attend talk about admitted students day. also were there any PhD CHS students there?

thanks!
 
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Jan 25, 2013
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can anyone who was able to attend talk about admitted students day. also were there any PhD CHS students there?

thanks!
There were 3 PhD CHS students there.

Here's my post about admitted students day, specifically recapping faculty and GSR positions: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?p=13821167#post13821167

Overall, I didn't really fall in love with the school, but I still think UCLA is my closest match. Some of the things I was a little disappointed about were:
  1. the practicum is the only real way to put what you learned into practice (and I heard a few stories of students not getting the practicums they wanted)
  2. the students didn't seem "in love" with the program
  3. the faculty are so difficult to get a hold of
  4. the research centers I was interested in rarely have paid positions for grad students (though they do exist)
  5. it sounds like some of the students who are close to graduating are having a difficult time finding jobs
  6. I didn't get a sense of community, especially since there are 60-80 students in a cohort for CHS

However, here were some positives from my perspective:
  1. it sounds like if you make the effort (emailing several times and scheduling office hours appointments), you can get good exposure to faculty
  2. there are several research projects going on that I'm interested in (they passed out a handout with each faculty member's current research projects)
  3. if you do get a GSR/TA/Special Reader position (and work at least 10 hours a week), you get tuition benefits AND salary
  4. students frequently finish the program early by 1-2 quarters

The agenda provided a lot of time to ask a lot of questions to current students, alumni, and faculty (which was great). They also gave us a buffet lunch and Fielding baseball hats.

Comparatively, I felt like Emory did a better job of making students feel special/welcomed (compared to their Fall event) and SFSU students seemed to really love their program, their cohort, and their opportunity to actually work with a community in their classes (I visited a class). Also, the Dean spoke for a bit (I heard Hopkins's dean didn't go to their admitted students day).

Again, personally, UCLA is my best option. They're local (family, weather, no cross country move), they offered me $, the curriculum is aligned with what I'm interested in (skills & populations), and I can start building my professional reputation in the area I plan to work after grad school. I will have to take the extra initiative to find community work during the school year to supplement my practicum and to build relationships with faculty. I'm also hoping to get some research experience with the centers, but that will probably just be volunteer work instead of paid work. Lastly, I'd like to get involved with the Students of Color in Public Health organization.
 
Oct 20, 2012
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It's great that you were able to get money for the CHS PhD program...I got into the PhD epi program but didn't get anything. :(

Also, is the tuition remission for GSR/TA positions university wide? I did not know about this...will have to check up on this.