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UCLA

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by MrAnonymous, Jun 25, 2000.

  1. MrAnonymous

    MrAnonymous Senior Member

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    Anyone know ANYTHING about UCLA. I got a letter from them a week ago that they have received my AMCAS application and will have a preliminary screening of all applicants through February. Does that mean, they wait for all the applicants to hand in their applications before determining secondaries. I hope not cause I REALLY want to go to UCLA (I know so does half billion other premed students). It's my top choice. I need all the information to help me get into their MD program. Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    ok, that's funny, i guess they deleted the previous jerk's posts.

    (i'll edit my own post accordingly)

    MrAnonymous, I'd take Jeff's words with a grain of salt. However, he's right about the competition to get into UCLA. Being that it's a state school (UC), there is a preference towards Californians, but i'm sure they do accept out-of-staters to some degree.

    best of luck,
    to both of you.

    -raindodger


    [This message has been edited by raindodger (edited 07-02-2000).]
     
  4. MrAnonymous

    MrAnonymous Senior Member

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    I am sure it is competitive, but what I lack in grades and experience I make up in written essays and interviews. I am awesome in such areas, primarily interviews... I'm sure if I get an interview I would at least get wait-listed. Its not overconfidence its just a natural thing I have been good at..

    ------------------
    What's best isn't always what's obvious..
     
  5. youngjock

    youngjock Banned
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    if you are not a californian, don't get your hope too high. have u ever checked out usnews.com, and see the out state acceptance rate from ucla? it is sooo low.
     
  6. youngjock

    youngjock Banned
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    i just hecked. last year, there were over 2000 out state applications for ucla, and only about 50 were accepted. that is about 2% acceptance rate.

     
  7. MrAnonymous

    MrAnonymous Senior Member

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    I know about the acceptance rate but the chances increase if you receive a secondary and greater if you receive an interview! If I get to an interview I know I can get a really good chance to get in. After all 2% did make it in... small but possible... it all depends [​IMG]

    ------------------
    What's best isn't always what's obvious..
     
  8. Snoopy

    Snoopy Senior Member

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    While dreaming is great, realism is sometimes more healthy and less disappointing. I sincerely wish you all the best in applying to medical school, and I hope that you have applied to a broad range of schools while still reaching for the top.
     
  9. MrAnonymous

    MrAnonymous Senior Member

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    One of the things I hope UCLA will do is look beyond scores and read my essays, secondaries, and letters of recommendation, which are all extremely strong and impressive. I took 277 credits for two degrees (not double major) and several minors. Maybe I shouldn't have taken so many classes and let my GPA be 3.8, but I did and don't regret taking geology, botany, etc..etc.. As for my MCAT, perhaps I should have of taken a prep course instead of studying by myself. By the by, I did volunteer work, work part-time, help out at my mother's store, went to school full-time, and MORE volunteer work.. Sometimes all I have is 4 hours of sleep each day an entire quarter... so if get me... I would be more than qualified academically if I remained taking 12 credits each quarter and not expanding my horizons. I hope UCLA will see what I have done instead of low MCAT and GPA scores which by the way are not TOO low to get accepted.
     
  10. youngjock

    youngjock Banned
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    dude, you are a dreamer. this is not a real tv, this is real life.

    ucla is a public school, there are so many of californians have the similar situations as yours. you and your parents don't pay taxes to california, ucla has no reason to ignore all those more misfortunate real californians.

    over 2000 out state applicants, about 150 got interviewed, only about 50 were accepted.

    Are you a >>under<<represented *minority* from out state? if u are white, and live out state, i don't think that you have a chance. That is the just the fact.
     
  11. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    I think, even if he is a urm from out of state, he'll be competing with all the other urms from california, who's parents pay a sh!tload of taxes to california.

    I wonder how many of those 150, out of 2000 from out of state, who were interviewed were actually urms, and how many of those accepted were still urms.

    The way things work in UCLA, there will be a primary screening in september based solely on your primary amcas app. They will then decide who to send supps to after that screening. That's what i got from the ucla website.

    Dont you have better chances at U of Wash med? BTW, my condolences to that Doc who was shot by that resident.
     
  12. MrAnonymous

    MrAnonymous Senior Member

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    The resident who shot his mentor was in pathology and was being terminated for some vague reason. It is sad to see this, makes me wonder how this situation could have been avoided. It seemed to me that the situation could have been handled better. There are always two faces to a coin.

    ------------------
    What's best isn't always what's obvious..
     
  13. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    i cant remember what news website it was on, but i remember that it said something like: "the resident's mentor wouldn't write him a good recommendation."

    there weren't any racial undertones, i think both were asian. i thought more students committed suicide during the first year of med school. are those stats correct?
     
  14. dlbruch

    dlbruch Senior Member

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    MrAnonymous- Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but UCLA is beyond your reach with a 3.4 and 27 MCAT. I applied as a CA resident with a 3.4 and 30 MCAT and didn't even get a secondary. I'm not sure what the minimum scores are to be considered, but I seriously doubt your app. with those stats will end up anywhere but the circular file. There are many other schools that will consider you, so I recommend focusing your efforts in a realistic direction. Sorry if this post is harsh, but being direct is often a good wake-up call.
     
  15. MrAnonymous

    MrAnonymous Senior Member

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    No, the resident was asian and the mentor was white. I don't think there were racial undertones though, just about the termination of the resident.\
     
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  17. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Don't fret UCLA, they do accept a good proportion of student out of state, part of the reason being that there are so many doctors in CA, so why give preference to CA residents - they don't need any more doctors in that state unlike the Dakotas. With your grades it is a crap shoot, it all depends on your essay and the way you present your self.
    Since it is too late to change you primary, I hope you wrote a good essay because that is a
    determanate factor. My girlfriend had GPA that is lower that yours, MCATs a bit higher, and she got into one of the top ten with one of the lowest acceptance rates. Do your best on secondaries, and don't hold vigil for UCLA
    - maybe you'll get in maybe not there tons of other great schools out there.
     
  18. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    Regardless of how many physicians are in California, the statistics prove otherwise. California Taxpayers do get preference.

    Here are the stats from Class of 2000 applicants:

    Undergrad School - # Accepted - % of applicants accepted

    UCLA - 41 - 5%
    UC Berkeley - 13 - 3%
    Harvard - 13 - 10%
    Stanford - 24 - 9%
    Princeton - 4 - 12%
    UC San Diego - 10 - 4%
    UC Davis - 7 - 3%
    UC Irvine - 11 - 5%

    Source:
    Director of Information Practices
    Office of the President
    300 Lakeside Drive
    Oakland, California 94612-3550
    ----------------------------------

    If you don't attend Harvard or Princeton, your chances are remote at best.

    -raindodger
     
  19. youngjock

    youngjock Banned
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    arti dude, u are from ny, u don't know what it is like in california.

    well, yea, after reading his message, i think that you should give it a try. It is just another 30 bucks, at least you won't feel sorry for what you have done.

    on the the other hand, the reality is that it is very hard.

    will you let us know if you got accepted at ucla?
     
  20. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Raindodoger:

    Princeton does not have medical school, where do you get your stats. Even going by your stats for UCLA, 41 people accepted out of state is not bad, considering they accept all together about 200 people and also considering
    that a big majority applying are in state applicants.
     
  21. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Oh I am sorry I just understood your stats. But they do not show % of out of state applicants. From U.S. News and world report. it shows that UCLA accepted 2.4% out of state, and 5% in state. For state schools that is pretty good.
     
  22. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    Arti, you misinterpreted the data I posted pretty badly!

    The list is of Undergraduate schools, and how many students, of those respective undergraduate schools got accepted by UCLA medical school for the last year.

    More students from UCLA (41) get accepted by UCLA Med, than from any other school in that list. The only two out of state undergrad schools which feed a large number of students to UCLA med, are Harvard and Princeton Undergrad. Don't go by the USNews&World Report statistics, they are outdated and the percentages don't accurately reflect how many students applied versus how many were accepted.

    -raindodger
     
  23. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Raindodger:

    I understand your stats, well now I do. But this says nothing about out of state candidates. for all you know half of UCLA acceptantees to UCLA medical school could have been out of state. It is true that in state fair better but of UC in general lots of out of state people do get accepted. Why?
    Because UCs are as I wrote before in California, where they really don't need any more doctors. Secondly UCs are huge research schools and inorder to stay competitive and on cutting edge they have to recruit from a national student body. I talked to UCLA and UCSD admissions officers, last year when I was applying, about being an out of state applicant and they assured me that the only time in-state applicant gets preference over out of state applicant is when the two are virtually identical. UCs are probably the only state schools in the country who do that, and consequntly it is true that out of state applicants do have a pretty fair chance
    of getting accepted.

    Arti

     
  24. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    LOOK at the statistics. Mail the people at the source I included with the stats, and ask them yourself.

    hmm, now i realize that you're full of it. On another thread, you state that you were a stanford undergrad. why would you call the UCs and ask them about being an out-of-state student? Do you really know about residency rules and the minimum amount of time people must stay in a certain state to be considered residents? and yes, instate applicants get preference over equally qualified out of staters. this restates the obvious fact that if you're an out of stater and you really want to compete with instaters, you must shine brightly to the adcoms, and such is the case looking at the stats, Harvard and Princeton bring in a disproportionately large number of out-of state students... but that's not to say that two or three out of staters can't come from other undergrads.

    Don't argue for the sake of being a devil's advocate. It doesn't work for you.

    -raindodger
     
  25. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Rain dodger:

    No one will consider you an instate student if you only spend timein that state as a student, any amount of time. You must work their not study to be considered a resident.

    Once again your stats say nothing about the residency of UCLA undergrads who got accepted into UCLA medical school. For all you know a good proportion of them could have been out of state as I said previously. In terms of talking to UCLA and UCSD admissions officers, you should call them your self and see what they tell you. In respect to admissions for out of state, in UCLA's words :"We'll only give preference to CA residents if they are VIRTUALLY identical to out of state residents, if an out of state resident is more qualified than he/she gets interview or an acceoptance.

    You know that you don't have speculate about the mystic ways of medical admissions process just pick up a phone and call, they will gladly let you know of their policies and statistics.

    Arti
     
  26. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Raindodger:

    Here is website of UCLA:
    http://www.medstudent.ucla.edu/frames/admiss.htm

    here what is says: "Residence: No preference is given to state of residence. However many applicants come from California. Acceptees from California are morelikely to matriculate at UCLA. Out of 145 freshman, 85 percent were from California."


    I guess I was wrong: the residence is not even considered when two applicants are virtually identical. It is not even considered at all.

    Arti
     
  27. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Raindodger:

    here is a website for UCSD:http://medschool.ucsd.edu/Catalog/56.html

    here is what is said: Preference is necessarily afforded to California
    residents when all other selection factors are equal, and consideration is given only to
    applicants who are either U.S. citizens or
    permanent residents.

    Is this not exactly what I wrote four article s back??????

    Arti
     
  28. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    Listen, you seem to be contradicting yourself repeatedly, and I've lost an inkling of what your original point was.

    And if you don't recall, the thread was about UCLA, not UCSD.

    Don't post for the sake of posting.

    -raindodger
     
  29. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Raindodger:

    My initial point and present point is that for out of state residents UC medical schools are a good option. With only 40$ per application and documented proof that residency does not really matter, out of state applicants should really consider applying to these schools. Unlike most other state schools UCs will consider seriously all
    well qualified applicants.

    Your completely unsubstatiated point, supported with irrelevant statistics, is
    that out of state residents are at BIG disadvantage when it comes to applying to UCSF/UCLA/UCSD, which is totally not true.

    You should not deter people from applying
    to UCs, which are excellent schools esspecially if an applicant goes to an undergraduate institution on the west
    coast, independent of their permanent residency status. West coast applicants
    , CA residents or not, do not have that many 1st tier schools to apply to on the west coast, and they should apply, if qualified, to the UCSF/UCLA/UCSD etc..,
    which will cut down on travel expenses.

    Now I believe I have proven my point with hard evidence and you have only insulted
    my reply to the original question.

    Arti


     
  30. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    Irrelevant statistics? These are the cold hard numbers, big guy. All you provided were assumptions.

    The following proves that it's highly difficult for an out of state student to gain entrance into any UC med school without high qualifications and attendance at a top tier undergraduate university. No other UC school blatantly proves my point than UC Irvine Med.

    READ the data.

    -raindodger

    ----------
    Class of 2000 - UC San Diego Med.
    Undergraduate School - % Accepted - No. Accepted
    Harvard - 26% - 26
    Princeton - 17% - 5
    Stanford - 17% - 42
    Brown - 21% - 7
    Yale - 18% - 10
    UCLA - 9% - 50
    UC Irvine - 4% - 9
    USC - 7% - 7
    Berkeley - 7% - 31
    UC Davis - 6% - 14
    UC San Diego - 12% - 32
    ---------------------

    Class of 2000 UC Irvine Med
    Undergraduate School - Applied - Accepted - % Accepted
    Stanford - 188 - 21 - 11.2%
    CA-Irvine, U of - 240 - 20 - 8.3%
    CA-Davis, U of - 232 - 19 - 8.2%
    CA-Berkeley - 467 - 31 - 6.7%
    CA-Santa Barbara, U of - 85 - 6 - 7.1%
    CA-Los Angeles, U of - 575 - 22 - 3.8%
    CA-San Diego, U of - 292 - 12 - 4.1%
    CA-Riverside, U of - 121 - 4 - 3.3%
    CA State Universities - 254 - 16 - 6.2%
    CA-Santa Cruz, U of - 37 - 3 - 8.1%

    ------------------------------

    Class of 1998 UCSF Med
    Undergraduate School - Accepted
    CA-Berkeley - 23
    Stanford - 22
    CA-Los Angeles, U of - 21
    Harvard - 17
    Yale - 15
    CA-Davis, U of - 13
    CA-San Diego, U of - 7
    CA State Universities - 6
    CA-Irvine, U of - 5
    CA-Santa Barbara, U of - 1
     
  31. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Raindodger:

    Harvard med accepts more than 40% of its class from Harvard undergrad. Going by your analysis method that means Harvard obviously favors massachusetts residents. Stanford med
    accepts a huge proportion of it class from Stanford, does this mean it favors CA residents.

    Of course UCLA med will accept more UCLA undergraduates, but who says UC undergrads have to be CA residents? I have plenty of friends who are MA or NY residents who went to Berkeley or UCLA, for all you know they could have been accepted to UCLA med (a school which I have proven does not care about residency requirements). And chances are that UCLA undergrad who is MA resident is more qualified since it very difficult to get into UCLA undergrad as a out of state resident.

    Also it is a mistaken notion that UCs behave like other state med schools when it comes to out of state applicants is what keeping the out of state applicant pool for UCs low which is the reason that there are not as many out of state students at UC as there should be.

    So stop detering well qualified applicants from applying. There are not too many schools on the west coast except Stanford Med, that are consider to be first tier schools. It is insane for very well qualified west coast applicants not to apply to the UCs just because they are not CA residents.

    On UCLA own website: "preference is not given to CA residents". This is as hard as hard proof gets.

    Arti


     
  32. Arti

    Arti Member

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    P.S. My reply really deals with UCSF/UCLA/UCSD (1st tier schools) not UCI.
    The former three are big research schools and
    thus they are the ones that have to select students from the national application pool to keep on the cutting edge.

     
  33. raindodger

    raindodger Senior Member

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    Wrong again...

    Whether a student who attends a California undergraduate institution is an out-of-state resident or not is irrelevant to this argument. We don't know if MrAnonymous is originally from California or not, but he attends U of W.

    More students who attended an undergraduate institution in California will be admitted regardless of their state of residence. The data I've provided reflect that.

    Are the students who've been admitted to UCLA,UCSD,or UCSF, California state residents? We don't know from the limited data that is available, but that is not relevant to the original discussion of this thread.

    The point is that students who attend non-California undergraduate universities, be they California residents or not, face stiffer competition when applying to the UC system, compared to students who attended a university in California. The numerical data support this contention and so do several other posters in this thread.

    If non-California university students decide they want to apply, nobody is stopping them, they should go ahead and apply, but they should realize that they'll be competing against a highly competitive crowd of applicants and the data shows that few of those applicants will get seats.
     
  34. UHS2002

    UHS2002 Senior Member

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    Fascinating discussion between Arti and raindodger, but I have to agree with dlbruch.
    UCLA with a 27 MCAT and 3.4 ?! I don't think so...unless med schools have gotten a lot less selective these days...

    If I learn of someone who got into UCLA with a 3.4 and 27, and wasn't related to some big donor or the nephew of the dean, I will be able to say that I have heard of just about everything when it comes to med school admissions!

    Gosh, it is great to be an optimist, but Pollyanna ?! Sure, now I regret I didn't apply to Johns Hopkins, who knows, even though my MCAT was several points below their average, they may have liked my personality, if I just made it to the interview list...
     
  35. Arti

    Arti Member

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    My argument is not whether someone with a 27 on MCATs can get into UCLA (chances are not, whether CA resident or not, although you should never give up hope). My argument also does not deal with which undergraduate institution the person went too. Most schools, state or not, will show
    more applicants and matriculants from that state and consequently that state's undergrad
    schools.

    My simple argument is that an out-of-state applicant (whether he/she went to CA undergrad) has the same chance in the application process for UCSF/UCLA/UCSD
    that a in-state resident (whether he/she went to CA undergrad) has. The quote from UCLA med confirms that.

    A lot of very well qualified applicants do not realize that UCSF/UCLA/UCSD are this way and consequently not too many apply, reflecting a low out-of-state applicant pool.

    The original person is wrote Washington State, I believe, and with 3.4 and 27 he or she has a small chance (still a chance) of getting accepted,depending on the strength of an overall application. But this has nothing to do with being an out-of-sate applicant in this system, this has to do with UCLA/UCSF/UCSD being a first tier med schools, that are ultra competitive.

    I am sorry if I confused an issue here or we were not on the same wavelength but that is all I have been trying to say.

    Arti

     
  36. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Raindodger:

    I only wrote my piece because of what you wrote in you intial reply to the original thread, and I am quoting:

    "Being that it's a state school (UC), there is a preference towards Californians"

    You should have said that there is preference towards student who went to undergraduate institution in California, and I would whole heartedly agreed with you.

    My reply only dealt with you saying that there is preference towards Californians, and that based on this fact out-of-state residents (whether from CA undergrad or not) are at a big disadvantage. By quoting from UCLA and UCSD website I think I proved that this is not true.

    Are we in agreement?????

    Arti

     
  37. dschroeder01

    dschroeder01 New Member

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    Hey all,

    I understand that outstate admission to UCLA is tough, but how much do chances increase if someone has pretty decent stats? ex. 3.95gpa & 36 MCAT?
     
  38. Arti

    Arti Member

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    Schroeder:


    Definetly apply. I think,all depending on your essay, you have great stats to get accepted into any school. UCSF/UCLA/UCSD
    will defintly consider you seriously.

    Arti
     
  39. guppies

    guppies Junior Member

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    Well, I don't know what Arti is thinking and how he form his argument but I know his information is incorrect and I am not even a medical applicant, I am just a Mom of one reading various discussions in the net, tpr, Gold, this one and others. I am sure the applicant can find out for himself with a little bit of research. Hard fact.
     
  40. none

    none 1K Member

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    California certainly DOES need more doctors, just not where the medical schools are located! We need a Central Valley medical school instead of just the scraps that UCSF throws away. Of course we need a quality UC in the Central Valley for that and it doesn't appear Merced is going to fill the role. And I believe the way admissions works is that the whole system has to take 80% in-state, 20% out. Note that that is the whole system, not any one specific school. Thus...I think it's quite possible that LA and SF would take plenty of out of staters, while SD, Davis and Irvine would take considerably less.
     
  41. Jalby

    Jalby I fight crime at day when Batman are sleeping.

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    I'm siding with the rain person on this, UC's definately favor california residents, and by a lot. And that's even just UCSF/UCSD/UCLA. Just look at USnews and see what the percent in state and out of state that get accepted is. That should answer the question right there weather they favor in state.
    That being siad, if you have strong stats (not just the average for the school) and your an out of stater, then you have a good chance of getting into one of those UC's. But if you have the average, I wouldn't count on getting an interview at any of them.
     
  42. UCLA2000

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    Did you know that the undergrad school which has the most med students at UCLA med school is UCLA?
    UC's take care of their own....just like Ivy's take care of their own.

    33% of Yale med school's first year class is comprised of people who went to Harvard and Yale. All of the UC's combined contribute only 3 students to their first year class.

    While interviewing at Penn I ran into a ton of people from Ivy league schools. Whereas while I was interviewing at the UC's (UCLA, SF, SD, D) I encountered mostly people who had gone to UC undergrad compuses.
     
  43. Scooby Doo

    Scooby Doo IEatShavedPussyCats

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    How did this 2 year old thread get going again?

    Do you guys realize it's from 2 application cycles back!! haha

    AND what is up with all the MOM's on the board doing this "detective" work for their sons??

    It's kinda wierd...
     
  44. LizardKing

    LizardKing Veteran Member

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    Getting into UC's as an out of state resident is tough.

    I did not receive an interview invite from UCSF and UCLA with a 37 MCAT 3.97 GPA. Got interviews at most of the Ivies and WashU.

    If anybody got an interview at UCLA and UCSF as an out of stater, let us know! It's an amazing achievement in and of itself!
     
  45. LizardKing

    LizardKing Veteran Member

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    It's much harder for out of staters to get into UCLA. Look at the data from the past MSARs, and there's disproportionately more in-staters accepted (avg. 130 vs. 20 out-of-staters). Even considering that more in-staters apply, acceptances are still grossly swayed toward CA residents.

    That being said, I wouldn't necessarily believe what UCLA writes as its policy on the matter. The fact is they are a public school and behave accordingly in terms of admissions.
     
  46. El Jefe

    El Jefe The Jefe

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  47. none

    none 1K Member

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    The UCs don't take care of their own like the Ivies. There are just too many pre-meds at the UCs. Way too many for them to find the same sort of acceptance rates that the Ivies can provide their students. Do you think all of these exported Californians are from the CSUs? Not likely...
     
  48. hehe so true...so true....
     
  49. Jessica

    Jessica Senior Member

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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by none:
    <strong>Do you think all of these exported Californians are from the CSUs? Not likely...</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Hehe....
    none... that is a good point. I = one less exported CSU student next year! :D
     
  50. UCLA2000

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    There are too many UC students that are pre-meds for the UC med schools to accept them all. What I meant was that there are more UC med students that came from UC undergrad schools than students who went to Ivy undergrad schools.

    ...and there are more Ivy med students that had Ivy undergrad educations than UC educations.

    It really seems like one big incestuous process.

    Don't tell me that alot of UC students go to out of state med schools..I already know as much, and I'm not interested in random med schools. We're talking about IVY'S and UC's.

    Look at Harvard, look at Yale..Hardly a UC student around.
     

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