GGale

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2001
22
0
Visit site
Status
I really liked the UCSF primary care program but I'm not a 100% certain I want to go into primary care. The PD says he's willing to be supportive if a resident changes his/her mind and decided to specialize and every year a couple of residents go on to specialize.

I also liked some categorical programs (BID, UCD, etc.)

The question: I've heard that you are slightly less competitive for fellowships if you go the PC route. Would the UCSF name cancel out the fact that it was a PC program or would I be better off in a categorical program at a less highly-ranked school?

Opinions?
 

bof

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Oct 27, 2004
218
0
Status
Non-Student
if you are interested in a big name competitive fellowship or a procedure intensive specialty, you are better off in a categorical program.

while it is true that some PC residents at UCSF choose to do a fellowship, their placement is not that impressive. but then again, it is a PC program...and putting people into fellowships is not their goal.

fellowship directors know the difference between categorical and PC programs when you apply for fellowship and you will definitely be a stronger candidate for a fellowship from BID or UCD's categorical program.


GGale said:
I really liked the UCSF primary care program but I'm not a 100% certain I want to go into primary care. The PD says he's willing to be supportive if a resident changes his/her mind and decided to specialize and every year a couple of residents go on to specialize.

I also liked some categorical programs (BID, UCD, etc.)

The question: I've heard that you are slightly less competitive for fellowships if you go the PC route. Would the UCSF name cancel out the fact that it was a PC program or would I be better off in a categorical program at a less highly-ranked school?

Opinions?
 

stu pedaso

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Feb 11, 2005
6
0
Status
I am in a similar position. The primary care program is one of my top choices even though I am interested in a traditional fellowship. I feel comfortable with this decision because you still get the same inpatient training as the categoricals and have access to the faculty for research, although you more directly focus on training as a general internist.

In addition, it sounds like the primary care program is becoming more closely linked to the categorical program with all of the internal medicine programs under the general leadership of the categorical program director.

Anyone else with positive/negative feedback about this program?
 
OP
GGale

GGale

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 22, 2001
22
0
Visit site
Status
It's true that intern year is exactly the same as for the categoricals but things diverge significantly for second and third year. One concern I've heard from other people who are considering UCSF-PC but not sure about PC is the logistics of doing the necessary electives/reserach for a fellowship while meeting the PC requirements for ambulatory care experience.
 
Feb 20, 2011
1
0
Status
Medical Student
Bump. Thoughts on the UCSF primary care tracks for someone thinking of GIM but not entirely sure? Categorical is nice in that you can always still do primary care, so you know you're leaving your options open. Specifically:

1. What are prospects for competitive fellowships if you choose to go this route? How much would being PC reduce your competiveness?
2. Anyone know if it's possible to switch into categorical if you decide against primary care?
3. Any general comments on the UCSF primary care programs?
 
Feb 13, 2011
7
0
Status
Bump. Thoughts on the UCSF primary care tracks for someone thinking of GIM but not entirely sure? Categorical is nice in that you can always still do primary care, so you know you're leaving your options open. Specifically:

1. What are prospects for competitive fellowships if you choose to go this route? How much would being PC reduce your competiveness?
2. Anyone know if it's possible to switch into categorical if you decide against primary care?
3. Any general comments on the UCSF primary care programs?
My impressions:
-Both PDs are awesome, dedicated, supportive...
-Residents in these programs are very devoted to PC and the mission to increase availability/importance of PC. Involved in related policy/advocacy/community work towards this mission. SFPC residents strike me as particularly passionate... I really liked them.
-While categoricals have elective time to pursue research or experiences in different specialties... all of the non-required ward months are spent in PC/outpatient clinic rotations if you are in the PC tracks. You will not be able to do a Pulm/cc elective, for example.
-A few PC residents have done fellowships in past few years... I believe these have been ID (with PC for HIV pts focus), geriatrics (again with PC focus)... Those who don't do PC seem to do general IM as hospitalist.

These are just my impressions... It also seems that while the UCSF name is great, it's best to go where you get the best opportunities/support to reach your career goals. If you got an interview at UCSF, you probably got an interview at other awesome places. I honestly don't think there is much difference in landing fellowship from UCSF than other top 20 programs... Probably will land a fellowship from any place on your list no problem. Seems like you'd rather be in a place where you could explore non-PC career options freely and with lots of support... if that's what you want to do.

My $0.02 :)
 

swamprider

2+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2016
3
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Can I bump this thread?
UCSF primarycare, especially the SFPC program seems like a great fit for me. However there's a chance that I would want to do ID or heme/onc fellowship afterwards. I personally think both these sub-specialties would fit well with a strong primarycare training but I wonder if programs feel that way. Can anyone shed some light on whether UCSF primarycare programs would be flexible with their residents carving their own path and being flexible with electives so if someone wants to sub specialize, they can?

Thank you
 

ShuperNewbie

2+ Year Member
Jul 4, 2015
100
58
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Well... I can't really speak to UCSF's Pricare program but I can tell you first hand that most of the 3rd years I know applying to fellowship from the PC track at my institution are getting interviews of at least equal quality as the categoricals. Also asked various fellowship directors. For the most part, they really don't seem to care (at least for Heme/Onc or ID). PC track doesn't seem to be holding PC residents back at all... judging by both the successful fellowship matches from PC and the quality of interviews. Take that for what it's worth though. I can't answer your central question of whether or not a PC resident from a more prestigious institution has a better chance than a categorical resident from a less prestigious institution though. I think that's a silly way to think about things. I would just go with the program I feel most comfortable with and know that at the very least, PC residents don't seem particularly hindered when applying to fellowships. Every year PC residents apply to GI/Cards/PCCM/Heme Onc/ID and every year they match without trouble. Usually program directors are very supportive of whatever ambitions you have. Also keep in mind that if you want to change and switch into categorical, it's certainly very possible (I wouldn't go into PC with this in mind though... that's just really disingenuous).

P.S. if you really believe that you'll have trouble matching into a top notch ID fellowship from UCSF, primary care or not, then you really have to learn how to relax a bit more :cool:.
 
Last edited:

Meridian32

10+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2008
97
94
Status
Attending Physician
I am a UCSF categorical resident and agree with ShuperNewbie above. SFPC residents can and do apply into subspecialties and the program seems quite supportive of this. Our primary care residents are just as well trained in internal medicine as our categorical residents and also seem to match well. UCSF is a fantastic program and I hope you enjoy your visit here (and interview season in general). Good luck!
 
  • Like
Reactions: ShuperNewbie