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UCSF

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by mustang289, Mar 5, 2001.

  1. mustang289

    mustang289 Junior Member

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    Can anyone give me any info on how the waitlist (high priority) process works at UCSF. What percentage of interviewees get waitlisted? When do they start taking people off the list? How many?
    Thanks!
     
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  3. gower

    gower 1K Member

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    UCSF:

    Of those interviewed, 43% are acceoted on a rolling basis for a class of 141. The first acceptances are mailed in mid-December. By April 15, 180 acceptances will have been offered. About 100 are placed on the alternate list.

    The alternate list is broken into two priority groups (top/good prognosis for acceptance and bottom/poor prognosis for acceptance) and rank ordered by May 15. Wait-listed candidates may call the office after July 1, but they will not receive detailed infpormation on the likelihood of acceptance. Nothing needs to be submitted to remain on the wait-list. However, a letter expressin interest in UCSF and an updated transcript are useful. Greatest movement from wait-list: usually in June. After June 15, 15 students, more or less, are accepted.

    All unaccepted applicants are rejected by Otober. Starting date: September.

    Of entering students, usually 80% are California residents. Non-residents must be exceptionally well qualified. It takes an out-of-state resident one to three years to achieve resident status; this time can accrue while a UCSF medical student.
     
  4. caffeinegirl

    Physician

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    Hi gower
    Since you mentioned the residency issue...I'm looking at trying to become a CA resident while at UCSF. However, in order to become a resident for tuition purposes, they say that you're not allowed to leave the state when classes are not in session!! Do you know more about this?

    thanks!!
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Emily1

    Emily1 Senior Member

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    I have CA residency already, but many of my classmates are working on that this year. I think there is technically some rule about not leaving the state, but I dont' know a single person who let that stop them from going on vacation. The biggest and most important thing is to begin accruing documentation re: residency as soon as you arrive in CA -- get a drivers license, register to vote, save utility bills, credit cards receipts, etc. You will get CA residency and thus lower tuition in your second year (I don't know what the 1-3 years mentioned above refers to). According to second years, it's not a big deal as long as you keep all your documents. Hope to see you in the fall.
     
  6. caffeinegirl

    Physician

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    thank you so much Emily!!
    You really helped me out, because I really got scared about the whole Cali resident thing. This really makes my choice *crystal* clear!

    see you next year (or maybe at the revisit weekend?)

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Annihilator

    Annihilator Member

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    Good to see another person procrastinating from studying for tomorrow's exam...

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    Annihilator
    MS1, UCSF
     
  8. chi-chi

    chi-chi Member

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    As just a word of caution, I always had the impression that it was relatively hard to establish residency in California. I have a friend who tried to get residence for about three years (part of which she was working full time while taking a year off from school) while she was a student at Berkeley, and unfortunately, she was never able to establish residency. I honestly don't know what the procedures are, but if getting in-state tuition will affect your decision I would recommend talking to the UCSF financial aid office to see if establishing residence is possible for your situation.
     
  9. lilycat

    Moderator Emeritus

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    Yeah, I would second chi-chi's word of caution -- I'm not sure if the rules differ greatly for grad school vs. undergrad but my friends who came out-of-state for UC undergrad found it really difficult to establish in-state residency. Definitely try to talk someone who is really well-informed on the subject if your decision is hinging on residency status.
     
  10. Oceandust

    Oceandust Senior Member

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    To caffeinegirl, Annihilator, Emily, or anyone else who'd know: how PBL-oriented is the new curriculum? I know that the "Prologue" piece is case-based, but isn't that just an introduction, to later format that is a blend of didactic (lecture-based) and case-based experience? If not, is it purely PBL?

    Is there more than a semantic difference between case-based and PBL?
     
  11. Annihilator

    Annihilator Member

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    Isn't PBL completely student led, student directed?

    The UCSF new curriculum is case-based. Student led discussions and PBL groups occur infrequently (at most once a week, approx). Case-based curriculum simply means you are taught the science from a clinical perspective, rather than the traditional research/science perspective (ie, heart failure case to learn about CV physiology, biochemistry, respiratory physiology, anatomy, etc)


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    Annihilator
    MS1, UCSF
     
  12. caffeinegirl

    Physician

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    From what I got from the new site on the UCSF curriculum, it says that there's only approx 2hrs of lecture a day, and the rest is small group and lab exercises. Though it may not be PBL, it had more of an emphasis on small group interactions...which is a highlight of PBL.

    Am I right on this Annhilator?
     
  13. Annihilator

    Annihilator Member

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    We have finals this week, sorry for the delayed response. The emphasis is definitely on small group interactions, but I'm also saying that the lectures and small group will approach the science curriculum from a clinical problem perspective. Back to studying Biochem... it's so hard to get motivated to study for education's sake when you know you only have to get 50% on the final to pass (grades for this class are cumulative).

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    Annihilator
    MS1, UCSF
     

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