shs

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If anyone has any idea what Interventional Cardiologist compensation is like in the UK, please share.
 

MPS

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That's a hard question to answer, and it depends upon how much private work one does. I’m assuming you’re asking how much a fully trained cardiologist (i.e. consultant) would make.

If you only wanted to work for the NHS, then your starting salary would be £67K, rising after one year to £69K - £75K and then after five years to £81K - £91K. There are also discretionary clinical excellence awards that are payable on top of the NHS salary: these range from £3K to £69K. So, a top consultant who is eminent in his or her field could make a maximum of £160K.

All of the above calculations leave aside private work, which can be very lucrative depending on where one lives and what specialty one has trained in. I'm not sure how well cardiologists do, however if you're really interested, there is a breakdown of min, max and average earnings for different specialties in "So you want to be a brain surgeon" by Chris Ward and Simon Eccles.
 
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shs

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MPS - thanks...yes, i'm referring to a fully trained consultant. Could you elaborate a bit on the dynamics of private work, i.e. what exactly is the demand for that.... how/why would patients pay out of pocket when the NHS is right there (i.e. how do you ensure a clientele)

how easily can one get involved in private work e.g. do you set up your own practice? work for a private hospital? (is Cromwell Hospital in London only for private patients)?

how do reimbursements work....do insurance companies pay the consultant, do patients pay cash to the consultant, do private hospitals pay the consultant a flat salary....?




MPS said:
That's a hard question to answer, and it depends upon how much private work one does. I’m assuming you’re asking how much a fully trained cardiologist (i.e. consultant) would make.

If you only wanted to work for the NHS, then your starting salary would be £67K, rising after one year to £69K - £75K and then after five years to £81K - £91K. There are also discretionary clinical excellence awards that are payable on top of the NHS salary: these range from £3K to £69K. So, a top consultant who is eminent in his or her field could make a maximum of £160K.

All of the above calculations leave aside private work, which can be very lucrative depending on where one lives and what specialty one has trained in. I'm not sure how well cardiologists do, however if you're really interested, there is a breakdown of min, max and average earnings for different specialties in "So you want to be a brain surgeon" by Chris Ward and Simon Eccles.
 

MPS

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Private work comes about because people want to beat waiting lists and/or see who they think are top consultants and/or want nicer surroundings. Private work is generally only well set up for non-acute medicine. As a general rule, the consultant will "rent rooms" either in a suite with other surgeons or physicians or in a private hospital. Some NHS hospitals have private consultation suites too. Some patients are covered by private healthcare whilst others may opt to pay it out of their own pocket. It is supposed to be easier to do private work in larger cities and in affluent areas.