DiverDoc

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Can anybody tell me anything about it? I didnt think their website was very informing at all. How selective is it? I assumed it wasnt as GUNG HO about research as KU was. But if anybody could tell me # of accepted, # enrolled, applied, MCAT and GPA or anything like that id appreciate it
 

Depakote

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dIvErDoC said:
Can anybody tell me anything about it? I didnt think their website was very informing at all. How selective is it? I assumed it wasnt as GUNG HO about research as KU was. But if anybody could tell me # of accepted, # enrolled, applied, MCAT and GPA or anything like that id appreciate it
Primarily a 6 year program, any AMCAS spots are to fill those vacated by people leaving the program.

Not nearly as reasearch oriented as KU Med.

Can't say about AMCAS level selectivity, try MSAR.

Avg class size is ~125 or so.

Don't go. Trust me, I hated it.
 

Dr Durden

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The vast majority of UMKC's class came in straight out of high school for a 6 year combined BA/MD program. Like Depakote said, you'll just be making up for any attrition. Thus stats for those who get in the backdoor might be hard to track down and verify. Having grown up in KC, I'd second the words of caution.

Unlike you, your future classmates will not have taken the MCAT. Sure, we pre-meds complain about it, but making it through the brutal prep and succeeding are somewhat of a rite of passage and certainly a badge of honor. Due to the accelerated nature of the program, your potential classmates will not have had much, if any, time to develop any outside academic interests. They will be younger, less worldly, and likely one-dimensional. It's a very clositered atmosphere.

Sure, Kansas City is spurring on local biotech developments (mainly at the Stowers Institute), but UMKC itself is not exactly the most respected institution in the state. KU-Med from across the state line claims this title in KC, with Univ. of Missouri-Columbia and certainly WashU in St. Louis taking the spotlight and funding for the rest of the state.

I would strongly urge you to apply elsewhere unless you will be a senior in high school next fall. Even then, go get a traditional Bachelor's, see where life takes you, and then apply. There's a reason why most medical schools delay enrollment until your twenties.
 

Dr. Pepper

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I got into the program but decided not to go partly because of what Depakote told me about it (probably PM him for questions).

Overall, the two main problems were:

a. The 6 year program is very strenuous and you have very little time for outside activity (mandatory summer school).

b. I don't want to go into family medicine, and UMKC doesn't have a very good match list in terms of competitive residencies. I have no idea what I want to do really (and perhaps I will want to go into family medicine eventually), but UMKC seems to be a good value only if you want to be a primary care doctor in the midwest.

c. (this might not apply for you) but I am out of state and the tuition is over 50k a year....... :eek:
-Dr. P.
 

NonTradMed

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Ouch, some harsh stuff about UMKC. I have a question. UMKC is a 6 year program, right? I am assuming that they just have students take the prereqs and then dive into the med school curriculum, so don't they have a couple of summers off?
 

Dr Durden

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The first two years are pretty much the infamous pre-med requirements with extra biology, psychology, and courses like "Medical Terminology" and "Fundamentals of Medical Practice" thrown in. The last four years are more or less medical school, with occassional general classes to fulfill the bachelor's requirements. I'm not sure exactly how many summers are free, but I do know that several of them are taken up in clinics. And all of this is generally thrust towards producing general practioners, for better or worse. Of course they'll brag about the occassional Mayo or Hopkins placement, but the non-traditional structure and general lack of respect for the school will likely cost anyone gunning for a more competitive specialty.