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isidella

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    I interviewed for the program during my senior year of high school-I did not get in. I was just a baby and did not know how to play the game. This was like seven years ago, but I do recall about 3 interviews, the last one with a crochity old fart. He asked me about my opinion on Euthanasia and I fumbled around long enough to basically kill myself. The other two interviewers basically said they looked forward to my matriculation (so I guess thay didn't have much pull on the committee).

    I do remember another applicant who had tried for 3 years to get into the program. . . She seemed bright enough with a decent ACT score. . .

    Good luck, and don't walk around campus at night alone. It is not a very healthy part of Kansas City (my hometown).
     

    bujji13

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      Akshar,

      I also interviewed for the program as a senior in high school, and I was not accepted. At that time, I knew that I wanted to go into medicine, and I wanted the security of a combined program, so I was very disappointed. But now, after applying and being accepted via the traditional route, I have this advice: Don't do it.

      If you are out of state (like I was), the program is about 320 grand in tuition alone; it is half as much for instate, but that is still costly for a public school. More importantly, you will be missing out on the college experience to a large extent. Also, while it seems like an exciting option right now, quite frankly, it isn't a very good undergrad or med school. I don't say this to be rude or put down anyone, I know that some very smart students are in the program. But after seeing the undergrad facilities, the main hospital, and learning about the resources and funding for the school (along with opportunities for research, and the caliber of the clinical sites), I do feel that the institution profits MUCH more from the students than the students do from the program. In regards to reputation, the school posted a 25% attrition rate when I applied.

      Since you are motivated enough to be considering this option, I am sure you are also willing to put in the work to do very well in college and obtain entrance the traditional route to a better program, whether in Missouri or elsewhere. There's a lot more to college besides getting into med school, and you might be selling yourself short by missing out on some great experiences.

      Sorry for the long and rambling post, but I hope it was helpful. If you have other questions, feel free to PM me: I have several Texan friends who are in the program, and they have had plenty to say about it.

      Good luck with whatever you decide to do!
       
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      bw07

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        I think if you're going to go for that kind of program, you should make an effort to go to one that has a strong name (Brown, Northwestern, USC, Rice/Baylor, etc.) I'm sure it's a good school, but if you could get in there, you could probably get into a better undergrad, go the regular route, and get into a better med school from there.

        Most of the better programs are 7 or 8 years long which will probably benefit you more. If you go with an 8 year program, then you'll have the same number of years college experience under your belt as many other classmates when you start med. school. You may also want to go to a school that allows you to apply out of the program without sacrificing your spot in their medical school. You can do this at Northwestern for example, but not at some others.
         

        bujji13

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          Oops,

          Looks like I got a little caught up in my message. :D

          Tips: From what I know, the interview is the most important part of your application there. Friends in the program have told me that, if you're instate and you've been granted an interview, your grades, scores, and resume become meaningless at that point. If you're out of state, the process is a bit hairier since there are fewer spots available. To do well in the interview, you could do a few mock interviews and/or buy a book from Barnes and Noble for advice on interview skills.

          Also, i remember being told to express a LOT of interest and reason for doing a 6-year program and in attending UMKC. Of course, they will want to know why/how you already know you want to be a doctor for sure, and you should be convincing on this point. But also convey your committment and focus for their program. Don't tell you want to take time off and travel; do tell them that you are positive that medicine is for you, that you want to realize your dream faster b/c you are so committed, and that UMKC is a good fit for you for the next six years. Lastly, however, also remember to be yourself, be confident, and be relaxed.

          If you haven't already recieved an interview, I believe your class rank and ACT (or SAT if out of state) are the main factors in granting an interview. Since they want to know that you are sure medicine is for you, having some health-related activities on your record that show you know what you are getting yourself into is also important.

          Hope that helps, and good luck.
           

          Dancing Nancie

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            If I were you, I would reconsider that decision. I used to work at UMKC (which is a pretty good place to work in research) but, the medical school program is not very highly thought of in the grand scheme of things. The "undergraduate" courses are watered down, so you do not learn much of what you would with a true undergraduate education. You WILL NOT earn a bachelor's degree in the process (which may hurt you when applying for residency). There is a big war between the school of biological sciences and the chancellor of the university right now regarding that issue and SBS is not about to budge. Plus, their board pass rates are attrocious. They re-vamped the curriculum 2 years ago to try and change this, but I don't know if it's helped. The other question to consider is do you really think you are mature enough to handle med school straight out of high school? 99+% of students are not. If you're in the fraction of a percent that is -- congrats to you.

            Seriously consinder your motivations for choosing a path like this. Many people who go into college pre-med end up changing their majors within the first 2 years of college. The tuition at UMKC is too high to decide to change 2 years in.

            good luck.
             
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