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undergrad in 3 years?

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apsojdoooo

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Ok so really im not a premed student yet, but next year i will be.
Im going to the U of I and I wanted graduate in 3 years with a bio major and then apply to medical school. I understand that this also pushes my MCAT, but I have taken some AP's so I think I have covered about half of it with those classes. My school accepts 4s and 5s so

APs
Chem- 5
Bio - ? I think I can get a 4 or 5
Calc BC - ? I think I can get a 4 or 5
Physics B - ? im not tooo sure

The rest im planning to take are just kind of chances. Ive taken all these classes this year, but I duno if ill get the 4 or 5. Span Lang, Government and Politics, Eng Lit, Eng lang

How hard would it be to graduate and then get into medical school. Also would med schools look down on someone that grads in 3 years with the most basic bio major.

Thanks, any suggestion, experiences, or opinions would be great
 
C

Critical Mass

If you do well on the MCAT, you're fine. If you blow it, schools will not take a serious look at you.
 

LeafNinja

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yeah I have 12 AP credits and can graduate in 3 years.

But why rush yourself? College is as time where you should try to learn as much as you can about anything and everythign that interests you, in addition to the pre-med requirement. NEVER AGAIN IN YOUR LIFE WILL YOU HAVE THE CHANCE NOR TIME TO DO THIS. Take advantage of it.
 

instigata

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3 years is a very bad idea.

I'm doing 3 years and have received 6 interview invites and I also applied late. My graduating in 3 years hasn't even been mentioned in ANY of my interviews. Frankly, med schools don't care. As long as your GPA is high and you score well on the MCAT you will do alright. The only problem that I see with graduating in 3 years is fulfilling a lot of extracurriculars, which I recommend you begin early in your college experience.

And don't listen to people on SDN about graduating in 3 years. I made a thread once about this and people told me it was the worst idea ever. Even other people said it (family, friends, professors). I didn't listen to any of them and I am really happy with what I have accomplished so far. Good luck :luck:
 

awk

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3 years is a very bad idea.

BS. I will graduate in 36 months with a very difficult ungrad and it doesn't make any difference. You will have an extra year of your life though while the others are lazing through the semesters. haha
 

Law2Doc

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Ok so really im not a premed student yet, but next year i will be.
Im going to the U of I and I wanted graduate in 3 years with a bio major and then apply to medical school. I understand that this also pushes my MCAT, but I have taken some AP's so I think I have covered about half of it with those classes. My school accepts 4s and 5s so

APs
Chem- 5
Bio - ? I think I can get a 4 or 5
Calc BC - ? I think I can get a 4 or 5
Physics B - ? im not tooo sure

The rest im planning to take are just kind of chances. Ive taken all these classes this year, but I duno if ill get the 4 or 5. Span Lang, Government and Politics, Eng Lit, Eng lang

How hard would it be to graduate and then get into medical school. Also would med schools look down on someone that grads in 3 years with the most basic bio major.

Thanks, any suggestion, experiences, or opinions would be great


Just my two cents but: College can be the best 4 years of your life. You shouldn't show up hoping to get out of there so fast. Additionally, you really should use those 4 years to try an assortment of things so you can decide if medicine is really for you. A very small percentage of those who show up to med school as premeds actually graduate with that same goal. And half the people who apply to allo med school don't get in. So best not to rush things. Since med schools like well roundedness, a very basic bio major done in 3 years with limited other courses is probably a bit of a detriment, and you will have less time to do adequate ECs, research etc. Your exposure thus far to medicine is likely fairly limited, so you really will want to find a way to get yourself some substantial healthcare exposure. Being a doctor is not what it seems like on TV. Best not to decide your future until you get closer to it. Finally, to some extent being a very young applicant to med school is often a hurdle -- med schools prize maturity and life experience, and so the youngest of applicants often don't do as well as they might have if they paced it slower.
 

baylormed

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3 years is a very bad idea.

It depends. It can really save a lot of money, I kind of wish I had done this in retrospect. You can always take a year off in between to travel and work and get some "life" experience before applying, which is something else I think I would have liked to do.
 

armybound

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College is a maturation process. Four years is a good thing.

On an unrelated note, do med schools take AP credit for your pre-reqs? I thought they won't?
 

Cirrus83

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I'm doing 3 years and have received 6 interview invites and I also applied late. My graduating in 3 years hasn't even been mentioned in ANY of my interviews. Frankly, med schools don't care. As long as your GPA is high and you score well on the MCAT you will do alright. The only problem that I see with graduating in 3 years is fulfilling a lot of extracurriculars, which I recommend you begin early in your college experience.

And don't listen to people on SDN about graduating in 3 years. I made a thread once about this and people told me it was the worst idea ever. Even other people said it (family, friends, professors). I didn't listen to any of them and I am really happy with what I have accomplished so far. Good luck :luck:
lol, yes but see, you don't have the benefit of hindsight yet. You're still in college, so you don't realize what it's like to look back at your college years in a couple of years. And when you do, that's when you'll realize that it would have been nice to be able to stay another year.

But then again, even us old people get over it eventually =p

I even applied to try and stay a 5th year (free), got rejected, debated about reapplying with a better done proposal, and decided that I was just afraid of the real world.

I think I would have actually enjoyed staying a 5th year quite a lot, but then again I also think I matured a bit in the real world. But I can't imagine having to leave after only 3 years. I guess if you're constantly miserable at college and just want to get it over with it might be a good idea, but honestly college is going to be the best years of your life-you're independent for the first time, and you're living in this community filled with intelligent people who are around the same age as you, and you have tons of great teachers there too. So...why the hell would you want to sacrifice a year of that?

At the end of the day though, it's your money and your life.

You know what you should do? Start taking courses now so you *could* graduate early if you wanted to, but as you're going through college figure out whether you really want to graduate early. You're not even a freshman yet, so there's honestly no reason to figure it out now.

If you hate your college and are miserable, then sure, graduate early. If you realize that you love it there, then stay 4 years. Problem solved lol.
 

awk

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College is a maturation process. Four years is a good thing.

On an unrelated note, do med schools take AP credit for your pre-reqs? I thought they won't?

This is not true for everyone. This is a non-trad thread. For me college was a de-maturing process? Anyways I did not feel like being around 18-22 years olds all the time helped me at all. Its good to be around people your own age or at least your same maturity and experience level. College was a stepping stone to get to Medical school. Like standing in line at the DMV it had to be done but by no means did it change my views.
 

etsuprinthead

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i would say, go in with the intention of graduating in 3, but be open to the possibility of staying for 4. i love college. i wish i had decided to take a year off between college and med school. despite that, i am quite happy with going straight through, too. would have been ready for med school a year early? not a chance. but if you are, go ahead.
 
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npuent

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I also graduated undergrad in 3 years, currently have had 4 interviews and 2 acceptances. It was never brought up ina negative way. In fact I typically brought it up as an example of my drive and determination to succeed.

As far as being able to do it in 3 years, I entered with 36 credits when I started. this was a combination of AP and summer classes at a local community college the summer before undergrad, so consider this if you feel you won't have quite enough hours going in to graduate early.

Taking the MCAT early was slightly stressful but I am a good test taker and good in school so it came pretty naturally and I got upper 30.

Don't let anyone else make this decision for you though. It is up to you and if you choose to do it it will take some dedication and hard work.
 

notdeadyet

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College was a stepping stone to get to Medical school. Like standing in line at the DMV it had to be done but by no means did it change my views.
Boy, you missed out.
 

rickthetwinkie

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BS. I will graduate in 36 months with a very difficult ungrad and it doesn't make any difference. You will have an extra year of your life though while the others are lazing through the semesters. haha

Haha because those of us graduating in 4 or 5 years are barely doing any work. :rolleyes:
 

thedelicatessen

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I graduated in three years, took MCAT third year, took a year off, and will be starting med school in the fall. These past few years have been an amazing experience for me. It's definitely doable, but be careful not to get burned out. It's great that you're thinking about your future, but just keep in mind that things can change. Good luck!
 

Law2Doc

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It's great that you're thinking about your future, but just keep in mind that things can change.

You also have to be careful not to put the present on hold for the future -- you can end up doing that your whole life. There will always be another target you need to achieve. Don't miss out on the college experience in your rush for med school.
 

notdeadyet

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You also have to be careful not to put the present on hold for the future -- you can end up doing that your whole life. There will always be another target you need to achieve. Don't miss out on the college experience in your rush for med school.
Amen to that. Talk to enough doctors and you'll find that when they reminesce, it's often about their undergrad days. Very few physicians kick up their heels and smile at memories of good times in residency or the chuckles they had in their efforts to build a new practice.
 

smq123

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On an unrelated note, do med schools take AP credit for your pre-reqs? I thought they won't?

Many don't. Some schools will accept AP calc in lieu of 1 semester of college-level math, but not all. You need to check the MSAR and the med school's individual website.
 

DoctaJay

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I could be wrong, but don't some medical school require actual college credit for their prerequisite science courses? Like don't they want you to actually take General Chemistry in college compared to having an AP credit for it? I could be wrong, but I swear that some school I applied to didn't accept AP credits for the sciences courses.
 

apsojdoooo

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Ok so I have considered the aspect of enjoying college, and I figure if I cange my mind as a junior and would like to stay an extra year, I always can. I can minor in something or just take extra classes for the hell of it, but Im still concerned about actually being able to do it. Im just finding out that med schools don't accept some AP credit so Im going to look into that some more

Anyways thanx for your help, Im still going to try to graduate in 3 years if I change my mind and still want to stay in college I can always do that.
 

Law2Doc

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Now now, no need for names, guys.
College is one of those periods in your life where responsibilities are limited, time is freer, and parties, alcohol, pizza and dates are not particularly hard to come by. You can schedule your classes to allow yourself to sleep in or be hung over; you have ample time to goof off daily, and compared to what's to come later the workload is fairly easy. If you feel that you are going to live it up that way throughout life, then more power to you. But that isn't really most people's experience. You will work a ton in med school and residency, and then will likely have the responsibilities of family, taxes, mortgages etc shortly thereafter (if not before). Live it up when you have the chance.
 

notdeadyet

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Anyone who leaves high school thinking, "I can't wait until I get out of college so I can go to med school!" was never going to enjoy it in the first place.
Good observation.
 
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