Aug 21, 2017
6
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Thank you in advance for your time; it's greatly appreciated!
My dilemma is that I'm not going to have any assistance paying for my cost of living or tuition throughout my journey to become a doctor. Many have said, "Just take out loans! You'll be a hotshot doctor; med school will be pennies!" but with today's average debt soaring, the thought of $250-$500k in loans is egregious (cant forget about the interest acurring throughout school!).

Ive already finished my English pre-reqs and taken a few 'elective' classes. This fall semester I'll be starting my intro chemistry class and finishing last math class. So, I'm only three terms in taking about 12 credits each term maintaing a 3.9 Gpa.

I want to get some perpective on my plan and figure out if my solution is viable.
Here it is: I'm working in an extremely profitable sales position where I'm only required to work ~30-35 hours a week. If I were to work all the way until matriculation to medical school, I would be able to save enough money to cover my entire tution and cost of living.
However, in order to work, do extracurriculars, and maintain my GPA above a 3.8, I predict I'll only be able to take three classes (about 12 credits) at most per semester and in doing so I would spend six years on my undergraduate.

Would it be wise to just quit my job and take out loans in order to graduate quicker with a larger courseload, or would it be more beneficial to graduate med school with $0 in loans and some money in the bank? Or would I not even be able to matriculate if I only took 12 credits a semester for six years?

Any advice or alternative plan would be extremely helpful!
Again, thank you.
 

Blanky

2+ Year Member
Mar 12, 2017
1,614
1,359
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
This sounds like a perfect plan. Continue working and performing at your pace. Do you plan on taking some courses during the summer? Just 6 credits during the summer will keep you on track at 30cr/yr which finishes you in the normal 4 year span.
 

DrHart

5+ Year Member
Jan 2, 2013
1,064
1,447
Chicago
Status
Pre-Medical
Eventually you'll have to bite the bullet. You won't be able to work your way through medical school. 30-35 hours is still a huge commitment as a pre-med.

Personally, I would rather work full time, pinch pennies, and save as much money as possible for two or three years... And then fully focus on classes, ECs, MCAT, etc. There are some things that you simply need to devote full attention to. Just my 2c, good luck friend
 
OP
K
Aug 21, 2017
6
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
This sounds like a perfect plan. Continue working and performing at your pace. Do you plan on taking some courses during the summer? Just 6 credits during the summer will keep you on track at 30cr/yr which finishes you in the normal 4 year span.
Thanks for the response. I do plan on taking summer courses as well. Any thoughts on how med school admissions perceive my relatively light courseload?
 
OP
K
Aug 21, 2017
6
0
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Eventually you'll have to bite the bullet. You won't be able to work your way through medical school. 30-35 hours is still a huge commitment as a pre-med.

Personally, I would rather work full time, pinch pennies, and save as much money as possible for two or three years... And then fully focus on classes, ECs, MCAT, etc. There are some things that you simply need to devote full attention to. Just my 2c, good luck friend
I appreciate your input. Any thoughts on being able to matriculate if I did only take 12 credits per semster?
 

mellie0

2+ Year Member
Apr 23, 2015
386
445
Status
Medical Student
I don't think taking 12 credits per semester is going to preclude you from matriculating at a med school, especially if you make it clear on your app that you worked 30-35 hours per week and paid for your schooling and cost of living all by yourself. There's also a portion on AMCAS asking what percentage of your schooling was paid by yourself vs. scholarships, family contribution, etc., so they'll be able to see that.
 
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Feb 21, 2017
48
13
Status
Pre-Medical
The finances all depends on your debt preferences. Some people hate the idea of debt, others see it as an investment in terms of education. Medical school debt can be managed after residency if you live like a resident for a few more years and prioritize your debt over a nice car or $300k house. I agree with the above, the course load shouldn't matter all the much. There are many paths to physician hood!

But if you can work somewhat during undergrad to save some money and that gives you relief, more power to you! Just remember that the goal is medical school and becoming a physician.
 
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