jtang128

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Hi everybody, I recently joined this site after lurking for a while, and I was wondering if some of you could help with a dilemma I have. Hope I'm posting in the right forum.

I'm currently enrolled in Rutgers University and am planning to graduate with a BS in Finance in 2008.

This summer I picked up an internship with an aerospace company as a Customer Service Rep...typical desk job, pushing papers for 8 hours a day. It's not bad, and the only reason I can stand it is because I know I'm not going to be doing a redundant desk job for the rest of my life. That got me thinking, what if I am? I honestly hate the idea of being 60, looking back, and feeling like I haven't done anything of value with my life.

So I've been thinking about getting into medicine. Here is where my questions comes in. What do I do about my major?

I feel reluctant to let go of my Finance major because of all the classes I've taken toward it, and it feels like it would be a waste to just start over and start on a science major. Also, I feel like if medicine doesn't work out, I always have my Finance degree to fall back on. It could also help when/if I try for a MD/MBA program, which is a distant hope but hey, we all gotta shoot for something, right? :p I suppose Post-bacc is an option...or I could take prereqs on the side/summer and take MCATs after graduation?

On the other hand, I'm not sure if having a Finance degree will set me back during med school applications. How do med schools view applicants with non-science degrees with no real-world work experience (if I do post-bacc)? Will I have enough time to do enough medicine related extracurriculars (volunteering, shadowing, lab work, etc.) while I'm doing internships? Are extracurriculars as important in getting accepted to med school if I'm a nontrad?

I'm sorry for the long post and all the questions but I've had a lot on my mind. Any help would be greatly appreciated. :thumbup:
 

njbmd

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jtang128 said:
So I've been thinking about getting into medicine. Here is where my questions comes in. What do I do about my major?

On the other hand, I'm not sure if having a Finance degree will set me back during med school applications. How do med schools view applicants with non-science degrees with no real-world work experience (if I do post-bacc)? Will I have enough time to do enough medicine related extracurriculars (volunteering, shadowing, lab work, etc.) while I'm doing internships? Are extracurriculars as important in getting accepted to med school if I'm a nontrad?

I'm sorry for the long post and all the questions but I've had a lot on my mind. Any help would be greatly appreciated. :thumbup:
Hi there,
Your finance major is not going to make much of a difference in terms of applying to medical school as long as you have done well and completed the pre-medical courses (General Biology, General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and General Physics). There are plenty of non-science majors who with good academics, get into medical school. There are no "preferred" majors for medical school.

You will need to take the pre-med courses and prepare for the MCAT (Medical College Admission Test). This test should be taken when you have completed your pre-med courses.

Extracurriculars for non-traditional applicants are the same as for traditional applicants. You need to show that you know something realistic about the practice of medicine and that you have an realistic idea of what this career entails.

Your whole application needs to be competitive. Academics (average GPA of 2004 medical school matriculants was 3.6 and average MCAT score was 30). These numbers are more likely to increase as opposed to decrease so make sure that you know where you stand.

Good luck
njbmd :)
 

drhuntzzz

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Make sure you know what your getting into. Being a MD or DO isn't for everyone. If you want to feel like you making a difference in peoples lives, but aren't ready for 4 year of medical school and 3 to 5 years in residency / internship there are other options.
I took two EMS classes at my college and have gotten a lot out of working as an EMT. Their are volunteer fire departments and part time positions that offer a shorter and easier path that could compliment a job in finance instead of replacing it. Real life doctors aren't like the ones on TV. You will deal with a lot of paper work and see a lot of patients that don't neet to see you and will not bring emotional satisfaction.
If you think you really what to be a doctor then begin planning NOW! Follow some doctors in you area and see if you like their jobs. Make sure you take the right classes and do well in them. A good BCMP GPA is imperative. Make sure to actually grasp the information and the MCAT will be a breeze (relatively). It's a long hard road designed to weed out all but the best, most dedicated students.
If I haven't disuaded you by now, Medcine can be a very rewarding field. I encourage everyone who thinks they might like it to seriously consider it.

My two cents

Good Luck
 

JamieMac

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First of all, this is the abridged version, and I still must apologize for the length. I’m standing in the shoes that you may eventually find yourself in. I’m a non-trad pre-med that has a double major in finance and accounting. I can tell you that I chose finance for the wrong reasons, and am now pursuing a career in medicine for what I believe to be the right reasons.

Upon starting undergrad, my primary goal was to get a degree that would eventually allow me to make a substantial income (I grew up underprivileged even lacking some of the necessities at times). Due to poor guidance and pure ignorance on my part, I decided that getting a finance degree would allow me to make big cash. It was as if I had blinders on during this time (i.e. I really wasn’t worried about whether I enjoyed the material or what I was getting myself into…it was all about doing well enough to be successful).

THEN, I ran into a situation in the first semester of my senior year of undergrad that thoroughly confused me: I took a bio class with a friend that was intended for science majors (I hadn’t yet completed the science requirement for my degree)…what ensued has haunted me since. Once in the class, I realized that I actually enjoyed this type of material and had a deep interest in it. For me, finance and accounting was just about going through the motions. This, however, was completely different. After the class was over, I had an epiphany that literally created a panic attack…Did I spend the last 4.5 years pursuing the wrong field??? I was freaking out…I had heart palpitations and the whole nine yards. I eventually calmed myself down, and categorized this feeling as ridiculous. After all, being a doctor was just for the super-intelligent anyway. Besides, it was much too late to change my path – I was almost done with my double major. I put those thoughts away for a later time…

After graduating…the J.O.B. After the initial excitement of actually obtaining a decent paying job, I fell into a bit of a depression. Pushing papers, crunching numbers, and creating spreadsheets was OK at first, but quickly became very monotonous. The intellectual stimulation that I sought was just not there. I eventually realized that as a financial planner, I was a merely a glorified salesperson. Two years and two jobs later, I decided that a job like that just wasn’t for me. I eventually stumbled into a business venture that has paid me very well over the last 9 years, but it involved what I will call “selling my soul”. In other words, I made a substantial amount of money, but I hated the work.

Due to the recent economic downward trend, this lucrative business venture has been reduced to "just a paycheck". Thankfully, due to a sound investment strategy, I have afforded myself the opportunity to pursue that area of study that had intrigued me so much before without enduring a financial hardship.

So, why am I telling you all of this? I made the mistake of pursuing a career for the wrong reasons, and I consider it to be a very costly mistake. If I can help someone realize that they might be doing the same thing…then it was worth the time spent in doing so. My recommendation to you is to make certain that you are going into finance (or whatever major you settle on) for the right reasons. Get as much exposure to these fields as you can by interning within the industry. Medicine may not be exactly what you think it is either. When I was in undergrad I didn’t do any finance or accounting internships because I thought I couldn’t afford to (I made a lot more money waiting tables). What I realize now, is that I paid a hefty price by not doing them. I would have realized in a very short period of time that I was going in the wrong direction.

Having said all of this, there are many helpful people here on SDN that can offer a wealth of information to you. Best of luck on your chosen career path.