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Ben25

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I am in Calc 1 this semester. I have earned an A+ so far at the mid point. At my college I only need Calc 1 to graduate wth a biology degree, but I am going to take calc 2 also. What math course do most students stop with? Would it be a waste to calc 2 and 3?
 

gmsquid

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Many med schools require Calc 2, especially top tier ones. so I would take that if I were you. Calc 3 and beyond are usually unnecessary. Also consider calc based physics as top tier med schools like that.
 
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baylormed

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I am in Calc 1 this semester. I have earned an A+ so far at the mid point. At my college I only need Calc 1 to graduate wth a biology degree, but I am going to take calc 2 also. What math course do most students stop with? Would it be a waste to calc 2 and 3?

I only took Cal1 and Cal2 (I took cal2 instead of statistics to fullfill the math requirements, I thought calculus was more interesting).

You don't need anything beyond that, but if you want to take cal 3 there isn't anything stopping you from doing so.
 

shnjb

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Calculus is an interesting subject and is the basis of all (close to it at leasT) science we have today.
Unless you're mathematically not inclined (I am inclined, just not talented enough) I'd suggest you take as many as you want, instead of just doing the minimum.
 

Droopy Snoopy

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Many med schools require Calc 2, especially top tier ones. so I would take that if I were you. Calc 3 and beyond are usually unnecessary. Also consider calc based physics as top tier med schools like that.

I wouldn't say many, but yeah several of the top programs do require a year of calc.
 

CubanDoc

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I would say that Calc 2 is usually the highest premeds go.
I guess that isn't new information

But I guess I'm not the best person to answer this...
I'm a Math Major :D :D :D
 

gmsquid

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I doubled in chem and math in 3 years...i'm mad crazy lol
 

baylormed

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Lets just say that it help me graduate with almost NO LABS past my sophomore year :smuggrin: :smuggrin:

I'm jealous. I hate labs with my whole being!

I should have majored in Spanish. The reason I did not do it is because I knew I would have gotten bored (I would have, but at least it = no labs).
 

Tired Pigeon

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Calc II is required by a few med schools. Perhaps more importantly, if you are pretty good with calc you may do well in calc-based physics, which would look better on your application than trig-based physics. If you go the calc-based physics route (usually called 'Physics for Science and Engineering' or something like that), you'll need the year of calc as a prerequisite or co-requisite at most schools.
 

Ben25

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Thanks for the advice. My next quesion was going to be about physics. At my college they have trig and calc based. For my B. S. in biology I only need the year of trig based with labs, but I am thinking about taking the calc based. I working really hard an earn A's in math. I hope I can do the calc based physics.
 
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Kfire326

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Thanks for the advice. My next quesion was going to be about physics. At my college they have trig and calc based. For my B. S. in biology I only need the year of trig based with labs, but I am thinking about taking the calc based. I working really hard an earn A's in math. I hope I can do the calc based physics.

I don't think it matters... I took trig-based (called 'Physics for Life-Sciences' at my school... lol) and got in to a few schools with an A both semesters.
 

sejin8642

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Usually tri-based physics is called college physics, and calc-based physics is general physics. So be careful when you choose med schools because some schools' physics requirements are general physics.
 

Kfire326

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Usually tri-based physics is called college physics, and calc-based physics is general physics. So be careful when you choose med schools because some schools' physics requirements are general physics.

I think you're reading too much into it... I took "General ________" to mean Introductory level courses, and none of the schools I applied to said I was missing any requirements.
 

novawildcat

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If you are good at math take linear algebra. Every scientist whether in bio, chem, physics or math should know some linear algebra. LA is used everywhere from computer science to biology to economics to statistics. A solid foundation in LA will be useful in many many different areas.
 

seadizzle

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multivariable calculus (calc III) - take those calculus I and II techniques and apply them to a sitution with several variables, which is much much more common in practice, also gain intuition about 3 and higher dimensional problems

probablity and stat with calculus (pref. multivariable) - if you took either of these courses without calculus you have only seen half the potential application, clear application to analysis of research data and clinical trials

linear algebra - like novawildcat mentioned this has application to so many fields, will complement strongly your ability to deal with multivariable situations by introducing ways to solve big systems of equations, also introduces important notion of eigenvalue/vectors that is useful in pchem (and diffeq more generally)

diffeq - this was really an eye opening class for me, there are so many relations that are best described using a first or second order differential equation (fluid flow, temperature flow, waves, stock price movement), it gives you a very powerful tool to use in a model context
 

FemalesCANTDriv

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take as many as you can. it looks better on your app if you are taking courses you don't need (that are rigorous) and you are doin well in the courses. if you think u won't do well, just stop at cal II. that being said, i was too lazy to take lots of math courses but now i wish i had. plus, there are only like 3 schools that require cal 2.
 

EagerToBeMD

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Usually tri-based physics is called college physics, and calc-based physics is general physics. So be careful when you choose med schools because some schools' physics requirements are general physics.

This is not true. I know of no medical school that requires calc-based physics. And by the way, the trig based physics at my school is called general physics and calc based is physics for engineers.
 

EagerToBeMD

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I wouldn't say many, but yeah several of the top programs do require a year of calc.

I only know of two schools in the entire country that require a full year of calc -- Harvard and Johns Hopkins. MOST schools don't even require a semester of calc.
 

sejin8642

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I will have to finish calc 4 and linear algebra since my major is physics.
 
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