Undergraduate suspension for fighting: medical school out of the equation for life?

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seeker123

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Hey all,

Going to try to not sugarcoat things here. Background: 30 y.o. male, have worked in technology in the past few years since undergrad, have also worked in education teaching middle/high school students in intimate settings.

Major f$$$up: I hope none of this comes across as an excuse because I don't intend for it to be. During undergrad (I went to a so-called "top 10" school), I was suspended for physical violence/threatening behavior. I started off school strong for only the first year or two, but then I went on a downward spiral as I dealt with adult issues such as relationships, heartbreak, etc. I had anger management issues and on one occasion got in a fight while intoxicated (I provoked it); and sadly on another occasion, almost got into a fight during an athletic event, verbally threatening the other person and throwing an object. Ultimately, no charges were filed in either case, but I received a hefty suspension, and rightfully so. On top of all of this, my overall undergrad GPA ended up in the low 3's - academics was the last thing on my mind, unfortunately.

College was a major awakening and growth period for me, and I've not had any incidents since then - worked on myself, saw therapists, practice meditation, etc all for my personal well-being and emotional maturity. In the past few years, I've been pleased with how my career's been going - got promoted to a senior position overlooking and mentoring junior folks. I've also been volunteering at a government hospital.

How severely am I limited in medical school admissions? Let's just say, assuming I go through post-bacc, earn high grades and a high MCAT score (this is just hypothetical, as I know how difficult actually achieving this is), will my undergrad record render it impossible for me to gain admittance? I understand the absolute necessity of having emotionally mature physicians, and also due to the insanely high volume of applicants, I totally empathize with why a med-school committee wouldn't even consider applicants like myself who have a suspension history.

Thanks! Appreciate honest feedback
 
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Epi Geek
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Hey all,

Going to try to not sugarcoat things here. Background: 30 y.o. male, have worked in technology in the past few years since undergrad, have also worked in education teaching middle/high school students in intimate settings.

Major f$$$up: I hope none of this comes across as an excuse because I don't intend for it to be. During undergrad (I went to a so-called "top 10" school), I was suspended for physical violence/threatening behavior. I started off school strong for only the first year or two, but then I went on a downward spiral as I dealt with adult issues such as relationships, heartbreak, etc. I had anger management issues and on one occasion got in a fight while intoxicated (I provoked it); and sadly on another occasion, almost got into a fight during an athletic event, verbally threatening the other person and throwing an object. Ultimately, no charges were filed in either case, but I received a hefty suspension, and rightfully so. On top of all of this, my overall undergrad GPA ended up in the low 3's - academics was the last thing on my mind, unfortunately.

College was a major awakening and growth period for me, and I've not had any incidents since then - worked on myself, saw therapists, practice meditation, etc all for my personal well-being and emotional maturity. In the past few years, I've been pleased with how my career's been going - got promoted to a senior position overlooking and mentoring junior folks. I've also been volunteering at a government hospital.

How severely am I limited in medical school admissions? Let's just say, assuming I go through post-bacc, earn high grades and a high MCAT score (this is just hypothetical, as I know how difficult actually achieving this is), will my undergrad record render it impossible for me to gain admittance? I understand the absolute necessity of having emotionally mature physicians, and also due to the insanely high volume of applicants, I totally empathize with why a med-school committee wouldn't even consider applicants like myself who have a suspension history.

Thanks! Appreciate honest feedback

Owning up to your mistakes is huge. I think age and maturity will work in your favor, but I'm not on an adcom, so I'll wait for @gyngyn and @Goro to chime in with their thoughts.
 
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Goro

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Owning up to your mistakes is huge. I think age and maturity will work in your favor, but I'm not on an adcom, so I'll wait for @gyngyn and @Goro to chime in with their thoughts.
There are Adcom members that believe in redemption, especially when many years have gone by and you have led an exemplary life.
 
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workaholic181

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Hey all,

Going to try to not sugarcoat things here. Background: 30 y.o. male, have worked in technology in the past few years since undergrad, have also worked in education teaching middle/high school students in intimate settings.

Major f$$$up: I hope none of this comes across as an excuse because I don't intend for it to be. During undergrad (I went to a so-called "top 10" school), I was suspended for physical violence/threatening behavior. I started off school strong for only the first year or two, but then I went on a downward spiral as I dealt with adult issues such as relationships, heartbreak, etc. I had anger management issues and on one occasion got in a fight while intoxicated (I provoked it); and sadly on another occasion, almost got into a fight during an athletic event, verbally threatening the other person and throwing an object. Ultimately, no charges were filed in either case, but I received a hefty suspension, and rightfully so. On top of all of this, my overall undergrad GPA ended up in the low 3's - academics was the last thing on my mind, unfortunately.

College was a major awakening and growth period for me, and I've not had any incidents since then - worked on myself, saw therapists, practice meditation, etc all for my personal well-being and emotional maturity. In the past few years, I've been pleased with how my career's been going - got promoted to a senior position overlooking and mentoring junior folks. I've also been volunteering at a government hospital.

How severely am I limited in medical school admissions? Let's just say, assuming I go through post-bacc, earn high grades and a high MCAT score (this is just hypothetical, as I know how difficult actually achieving this is), will my undergrad record render it impossible for me to gain admittance? I understand the absolute necessity of having emotionally mature physicians, and also due to the insanely high volume of applicants, I totally empathize with why a med-school committee wouldn't even consider applicants like myself who have a suspension history.

Thanks! Appreciate honest feedback

If you just own it and explain how you have changed (as you did here) I think you would be okay. This was what, 9 years ago? As long as you can substantiate growth and newfound academic excellence, I think you'll have a shot.
 
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aformerstudent

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Which answer were you looking for? The feel good one or the harsh reality?

Feel good one:
There are Adcom members that believe in redemption, especially when many years have gone by and you have led an exemplary life.

Harsh reality one: Look at who your competition will be. Students who already have the grades who don't need any redemption.

Not saying you shouldn't move forward because I don't know you but I don't want to do you a disservice and sugarcoat anything for you considering you're 30 and this journey will require money and time...time that is not on your side.
 
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