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whizatphys

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Significant changes since leaving medical school (approx. 4 months prior):

1) Improvement in overall health
-Before leaving = 154 lbs; today = 138.5 pounds
-Dissipation of nodulocystic acne and regrowth of hair on scalp
-Exercising daily (elliptical for 30 minutes at gym) + hiking/walking/running with dog
-Better eating (due to sufficient time for grocery shopping -- mainly organic, price permitting)
-Reduced sugar in diet (no more than 50g per day)
-Juicing veggies & fruit approx. 2-3x per week (carrots, spinach, kale, apples, ginger, orange etc.)
-Receiving at least 20 minutes of sunlight per day (Vitamin D)
-Regularly taking:
a) daily multivitamins (organic)
b) green tea tablet (organic; 1-2 tablets/day)
3) escitalopram 20 mg/day (for obsessive compulsive disorder)

2) Improved sleep hygiene
-Sleeping every night without assistance from pharmaceuticals
-Receiving approx. 8 hours of sleep per night
-Reduction in frequency and severity of nightmares

3) Psychiatric improvement
-Less paranoid
-No longer feeling depressed
-Experiencing increased levels of energy upon waking
-No longer fatigued during mid-day (and, if so, exercise consistently improves)
-Less fear of the unknown; less frequently talking oneself out of following one's gut
-Increased sense of pride in one's work (likely due to increased productivity & efficiency)
-More positive interactions and relationships with close friends and family members
-Enhanced sense of overall wellbeing
 
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NontradCA

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This history is missing many pieces. Is this a well visit or no? CC?
 

bashwell

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Significant changes since leaving medical school (approx. 4 months prior):

1) Improvement in overall health
-Before leaving = 154 lbs; today = 138.5 pounds
-Dissipation of nodulocystic acne and regrowth of hair on scalp
-Exercising daily (elliptical for 30 minutes at gym) + hiking/walking/running with dog
-Better eating (due to sufficient time for grocery shopping -- mainly organic, price permitting)
-Reduced sugar in diet (no more than 50g per day)
-Juicing veggies & fruit approx. 2-3x per week (carrots, spinach, kale, apples, ginger, orange etc.)
-Receiving at least 20 minutes of sunlight per day (Vitamin D)
-Regularly taking:
a) daily multivitamins (organic)
b) green tea tablet (organic; 1-2 tablets/day)
3) escitalopram 20 mg/day (for obsessive compulsive disorder)

2) Improved sleep hygiene
-Sleeping every night without assistance from pharmaceuticals
-Receiving approx. 8 hours of sleep per night
-Reduction in frequency and severity of nightmares

3) Psychiatric improvement
-Less paranoid
-No longer feeling depressed
-Experiencing increased levels of energy upon waking
-No longer fatigued during mid-day (and, if so, exercise consistently improves)
-Less fear of the unknown; less frequently talking oneself out of following one's gut
-Increased sense of pride in one's work (likely due to increased productivity & efficiency)
-More positive interactions and relationships with close friends and family members
-Enhanced sense of overall wellbeing
It sounds like your decision to leave med school was the right decision for you. I'm happy to hear your life is so much better, and I only hope your life continues to get better and better over time.

That said, to be fair, there are some people who enjoyed med school and didn't have any or most of these problems, or at least only had them for a short time.
 

AspiringERMD

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Glad to hear that you've made the right decision for you. Sounds like it really wasn't worth it and that you're much healthier. I hope you find a career path that makes you happy and that you continue to have no regrets!

(Aside: Eating organic won't make you healthier or keep you safer, according to the large majority of the scientific literature I've seen, so save your money!)
 
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I was paranoid about getting out of shape with the limited time. Trick for me was to optimize time spent working out by cramming stuff into shorter workouts and working out oNE less day per week. Now the overall calories burned would be slightly less. But I made up for it by eating slightly less as the difference was small. For diet, I stuck to basic stuff like black beans brown rice and chixken and cooked up for a few days in a row. My physical health was generally good.

Mentally different though. After having this first summer off and spending all this time with the fam, friends and SO, it's annoying to go back to it.
 

Hrdrock

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Glad to hear your quality of life has drastically improved. I'm assuming that is in lieu of you also securing your financial situation? I'd imagine that's the number one fear students have when considering leaving medical school.
 

Mad Jack

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Glad you're doing well. I don't think medical school is, by its very nature, awful. I think your school and your personality were a poor fit. I have many of the same issues as you do, but my school has allowed me to do fairly well academically, and better than expected emotionally. Many of my classmates are having literally the time of their lives, staying happy and healthy, working out five and six days a week, etc.

Essentially, your issue wasn't a problem of medical school being awful, but rather, an issue of fit, coping skills, personality, and priorities. It's good you've found a lifestyle that better fits your personality and needs.
 

wjs010

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During our first system at the end of M1, I increased my workouts... I found that about an hour a day, 3-5 x week is doable in the gym... But the 2 hrs after that I'm tired totally cuts into studying time. Oh well. OP it's good you feel healthier and happy again!
 

Frazier

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Gotta keep the health up, man. I hit the gym 50 min/6-7 days/wk.

This included IM and Surg.

Still gained 10 pounds since starting ms3...but this is due to baller lunch conference catering day after day...filet mignon, sushi, stuffed peppers, salmon, shrimp scampi, ish is ridiculous lol

Residency on surg...that's a different story ... those poor bastards. :(
 
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el_duderino

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I tried to PM you about your experience, but apparently your account isn't accepting PMs. It sounds like you made the right decision for yourself, but I'm curious to what extent you engaged with the administration and services.
 

ACSurgeon

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I think it's more of a post to try and show current students that if they aren't happy, leaving isn't the end of the world.
A lot of people aren't happy in med school. The important thing is not going beyond your individual breaking point. Dealing with adversity is part of life. Sticking with something despite clear physical and psychological harm, that's a different can if worms, and not wise.
 
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ACSurgeon

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Well by showing people that they aren't necessarily stuck or boxed in to completing med school and things can get better.
Obviously not going through medical training is easier than going through medical training. Of course you have more time to sleep and live healthy if you're not working 80 hrs/ week and rarely getting a true day off.

However, make no mistake that once you're in med school more than a semester or two, you're kinda stuck and leaving is not easy for financial and emotional reasons.

"Things can get better"- sure some aspects do, some get worse. It's a trade off that every person has to individually assess for themselves.
 

Stagg737

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Doctor Bob

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-Regularly taking:
a) daily multivitamins (organic)
b) green tea tablet (organic; 1-2 tablets/day)
3) escitalopram 20 mg/day (for obsessive compulsive disorder)
The lexapro must be working to control the OCD... even unmedicated I'd have trouble numbering a list "a, b, 3"
 
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Obviously not going through medical training is easier than going through medical training. Of course you have more time to sleep and live healthy if you're not working 80 hrs/ week and rarely getting a true day off.

However, make no mistake that once you're in med school more than a semester or two, you're kinda stuck and leaving is not easy for financial and emotional reasons.

"Things can get better"- sure some aspects do, some get worse. It's a trade off that every person has to individually assess for themselves.
I'm sorry, I meant things can get better in many ways when it comes to leaving medical school. But I disagree that you're stuck in the first or second semester. You're stuck after 2nd year.

Cue the usual people talking about how much they just :love:third year.
 

IlDestriero

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It sounds like you made the right decision for you at that time. Good luck with your search for a new career!
 

ACSurgeon

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I'm sorry, I meant things can get better in many ways when it comes to leaving medical school. But I disagree that you're stuck in the first or second semester. You're stuck after 2nd year.

Cue the usual people talking about how much they just :love:third year.
I figured that's what you meant, and I agree with that assessment. It's important for people who are struggling but overall making it through to understand the severity of leaving med school once you're in debt, emotionally invested etc.

It sounds like the OP reached her breaking point and leaving was the right thing for her. I hope she's really thriving. This is likely the exception and not the rule (I know a few people who left professional school and they were never the same).
 

Mad Jack

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This is likely the exception and not the rule (I know a few people who left professional school and they were never the same).
I think it largely depends on the reason a person left. The ones that leave for quality of life issues etc tend to be much, much happier than the ones that straight up failed out. Wanting to leave and being shown the door have very different effects on people. I've never met a person that voluntarily left and wasn't happy myself.
 
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Won't let me paste your reply for some reason. @lazymed,

I think it depends why the person left - failing to the point of academic dismissal where you have no choice vs. voluntarily leaving to save yourself. Oops, didn't see what @Mad Jack said. Pretty much what he said. As you get further and further along - 3rd year, 4th year, internship, or residency, turning around is nearly impossible. And if by the time third year is over, if only 1 specialty will make you tolerant of medicine, you're even more screwed since unlike a midlevel, you have to have residency to practice it.
 
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masaraksh

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Gotta keep the health up, man. I hit the gym 50 min/6-7 days/wk.

This included IM and Surg.

Still gained 10 pounds since starting ms3...but this is due to baller lunch conference catering day after day...filet mignon, sushi, stuffed peppers, salmon, shrimp scampi, ish is ridiculous lol

Residency on surg...that's a different story ... those poor bastards. :(
my school needs to get in on this.
 
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masaraksh

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I think it depends why the person left - failing to the point of academic dismissal where you have no choice vs. voluntarily leaving to save yourself. Oops, didn't see what @Mad Jack said. Pretty much what he said. As you get further and further along - 3rd year, 4th year, internship, or residency, turning around is nearly impossible. And if by the time third year is over, if only 1 specialty will make you tolerant of medicine, you're even more screwed.
Yeah, I remember some big poster posted that his DO school let a student repeat a year after failing twice. Can't help but think that person will end up miserable.. 1.5X debt (assuming loans that is) or cost to parents.... and like massive red flag for residency
 
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Yeah, I remember some big poster posted that his DO school let a student repeat a year after failing twice. Can't help but think that person will end up miserable.. 1.5X debt (assuming loans that is) or cost to parents.... and like massive red flag for residency
I would think so also, but I think it depends if it was a basic science failure or clerkship failure, and what specialties he can reasonably shoot for or want to go for. It's not automatically Family Med, but still scary.
 

ACSurgeon

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Won't let me paste your reply for some reason. @lazymed,

I think it depends why the person left - failing to the point of academic dismissal where you have no choice vs. voluntarily leaving to save yourself. Oops, didn't see what @Mad Jack said. Pretty much what he said. As you get further and further along - 3rd year, 4th year, internship, or residency, turning around is nearly impossible. And if by the time third year is over, if only 1 specialty will make you tolerant of medicine, you're even more screwed since unlike a midlevel, you have to have residency to practice it.
True. Also depends on a person's support system and their personal views. After spending at least 4 years trying to get into med school, they becomes all you know. It becomes what you're known for by family and friends. Some feel ashamed to leave 1-2 years into it, because they're really 5-6 years into it. Loans also don't help. Also, since many/most have a useless degree before med school (biology)- it's hard to do something anywhere near as stable as medicine without a lot of hardship.

So, even if you're passing but miserable, it's still very hard to decide to leave. Obviously, there comes a time where one has to be a grown up and do the right thing for their overall well being, and the right thing will be different for different people.
 

masaraksh

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True. Also depends on a person's support system and their personal views. After spending at least 4 years trying to get into med school, they becomes all you know. It becomes what you're known for by family and friends. Some feel ashamed to leave 1-2 years into it, because they're really 5-6 years into it. Loans also don't help. Also, since many/most have a useless degree before med school (biology)- it's hard to do something anywhere near as stable as medicine without a lot of hardship.

So, even if you're passing but miserable, it's still very hard to decide to leave. Obviously, there comes a time where one has to be a grown up and do the right thing for their overall well being, and the right thing will be different for different people.
do you think its that time yet that more people have a useless degree from undergrad than a useful one.
 

ACSurgeon

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do you think its that time yet that more people have a useless degree from undergrad than a useful one.
Seems like most premed and then med students or residents have college degrees that require more schooling to be useful. Not sure if I understand your question...
 

TBV

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Yeah, I remember some big poster posted that his DO school let a student repeat a year after failing twice. Can't help but think that person will end up miserable.. 1.5X debt (assuming loans that is) or cost to parents.... and like massive red flag for residency
There is a kid in my MD school like this... still sold on ortho though
 
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Mad Jack

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True. Also depends on a person's support system and their personal views. After spending at least 4 years trying to get into med school, they becomes all you know. It becomes what you're known for by family and friends. Some feel ashamed to leave 1-2 years into it, because they're really 5-6 years into it. Loans also don't help. Also, since many/most have a useless degree before med school (biology)- it's hard to do something anywhere near as stable as medicine without a lot of hardship.

So, even if you're passing but miserable, it's still very hard to decide to leave. Obviously, there comes a time where one has to be a grown up and do the right thing for their overall well being, and the right thing will be different for different people.
Yeah- for people like myself that already had stable careers, didn't share our ambitions of need school until we were accepted, and only invested a year of postbacc course into med school, it really isn't that big of a deal to up and leave. It's just a job, etc, quality of life is more important than any career. For premeds that know nothing else, it's got to be crazy disruptive because they didn't have much of an identity aside from medicine, so they've got nothing left when they lose it. Not that all premeds are like that, but many are.
 

Entadus

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Time for a non sequitur response! For me, it's as simple as asking: If we all took the OP's path, who would care for patients? A single medical student who braves a few years of 'teh suxx0rz' has the power to positively impact the lives of countless sick people. For that reason alone, medicine is worth it to me.
 

fastlane

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It's not that difficult to do pretty much all of #1 while in medical school.
#2 is more along the line of a personal problem. I've never had trouble sleeping except for the night before my step 1.
#3 is also your individual personal problem.

Quitting and leaving medical school may feel great in the short term (stick it to the man, dude) but the regret will come. Being a 100k+ in debt with no guaranteed $200K+/yr job is not a great feeling. If you find a job paying 40-50K/year you will probably remain in debt for life.
I prefer to continue taking the temporary sacrifices of training to have a great job for the 30+ years of day to day work after medical school and residency are done.
 

ACSurgeon

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Time for a non sequitur response! For me, it's as simple as asking: If we all took the OP's path, who would care for patients? A single medical student who braves a few years of 'teh suxx0rz' has the power to positively impact the lives of countless sick people. For that reason alone, medicine is worth it to me.
It's not that difficult to do pretty much all of #1 while in medical school.
#2 is more along the line of a personal problem. I've never had trouble sleeping except for the night before my step 1.
#3 is also your individual personal problem.

Quitting and leaving medical school may feel great in the short term (stick it to the man, dude) but the regret will come. Being a 100k+ in debt with no guaranteed $200K+/yr job is not a great feeling. If you find a job paying 40-50K/year you will probably remain in debt for life.
I prefer to continue taking the temporary sacrifices of training to have a great job for the 30+ years of day to day work after medical school and residency are done.
The OP doesn't strike me as someone who was not willing to make "temporary sacrafices", she reached the point of not being able to continue without inflicting irreversible harm to herself. This happens to a minority of students. Some leave med school. Some try to stick it out and make it through with significant damage that they cope with to varying degrees. Some try to stick it out and then break in the process, and still never make it through.

Otherwise yea, if you can push through, no one will tell you not to just to avoid moderate stress or to avoid studying long hours.
 
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