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Urgent Care Physician $125/hr vs. Day Shift ED Nurse $125/hr

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2021Doctor

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Job Description​

Urgent Care - Eastern Indiana
Recruiting full-time urgent care physician to join Urgent Care. Excellent compensation and benefits packages.
Hospital employment – Hourly rate of $125/hr
Full hospital benefits
Signing bonus of $50,000
Student loan repayment up to $50,000
Relocation up to $10,000
Electronic Medical Records (office and hospital)
CLIA certified lab within office
Collegial co-workers and staff (many with 15+ years at the practice)
Opportunity to work with 3rd and 4th year medical students


RN - Emergency Department - Day Shift - Hourly wage $125​

LOCATION SILVERDALE, WASHINGTON POSTED 13 JAN 2022
JOB SUMMARY:

Contract registered nurses (RN's) give the sick and ailing care in healthcare facilities for a mutually agreed upon time, usually between 8-20+ weeks. They work as part of a team with physicians, other nurses and healthcare professionals to provide care, monitor health conditions, plan long-term care needs, administer medicine, use medical equipment, perform minor medical operations, and advise patients and their families on illness, care and continued care after a hospital stay. Duties include the following:

JOB DESCRIPTION:


  • Great pay, benefits available (Health, Vision, Dental, etc)
  • Identifies patient care requirements by establishing personal rapport with potential and actual patients and other persons in a position to understand care requirements.
 
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Rekt

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The boom is ending soon. My hospital, one of the highest volume EDs in the state just cut all the travel contracts. Smart RNs took the staff job offers as they know this won't last.
 
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AlmostAnMD

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The part that stands out to me is the part about the urgent care doctor working with third and fourth year medical students

That's just sad, I feel terribly for any student that has to rotate through an urgent care. Are there not enough emergency rotations, ambulatory rotations, or both?
 
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RustedFox

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The part that stands out to me is the part about the urgent care doctor working with third and fourth year medical students

That's just sad, I feel terribly for any student that has to rotate through an urgent care. Are there not enough emergency rotations, ambulatory rotations, or both?

I'll wager it's FM and not EM residents rotating thru an urgent care.
 

DeadCactus

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You're comparing a mundane, low stress, business-hours, long-term position with full benefits (including substantial bonuses) to a temporary, high-stress, all hours, contract position with no benefits.
 
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EctopicFetus

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To be fair Ed nurses are useful. Urgent cares add little value. Likely just increase spend. Spare me the what about this kid with a lac. I’m talking as a whole. They add cost for little to no useful services.
 
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Brigade4Radiant

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The nurse boom may be ending but nurses will still make more than they used to so its a net positive. Some Jobs have cut travel contracts but an ED nurse can work in ICU, floor, cath lab.

Any argument that says nurse pay will go down can easily be used for ED physicians. Also factoring in the opportunity cost plus debt the nurse is the clear winner this is also day shift only. So you don't have to deal with the circadian rhythm disruption. Not to mention they can go into management and administration.
 
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Brigade4Radiant

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The best and brightest are going into tech. Medicine is still competitive but going to medical school plus debt plus having a high stakes exam determine what field you can match into plus residency and all the liability and stress that medicine brings. Also because of the pandemic a lot of tech workers can work remotely so there's that as well. And the fact that you must give up a decade for intense training (80 hour weeks and "golden" lol weekends).

Many of the top tech companies have excellent work life balance as well as paid paternity, paid vacation, 401k employee and employer max. Also you have options of going into startups.

Edit not to mention that tech can be malleable. Physicians are not see EM physicians. If you have to spend two-three years of training to do a "different field of medicine" then your field is not flexible at all. Also I need to say we don't get sick days. If you are sick you lose money and even now with Covid you are expected to work.
 
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The Knife & Gun Club

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I'll wager it's FM and not EM residents rotating thru an urgent care.
Yea likely med students doing FM not EM. My med school had a couple weeks of urgent care in the FM clerkship. Honestly a useful experience to see how they operate and what they can or can not handle. And working alongside urgent care NPs is…enlightening.

There was actually a dedicated urgent care elective for FM bound MS4s that was quite popular.
 
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aafisahar

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The best and brightest are going into tech. Medicine is still competitive but going to medical school plus debt plus having a high stakes exam determine what field you can match into plus residency and all the liability and stress that medicine brings. Also because of the pandemic a lot of tech workers can work remotely so there's that as well. And the fact that you must give up a decade for intense training (80 hour weeks and "golden" lol weekends).

Many of the top tech companies have excellent work life balance as well as paid paternity, paid vacation, 401k employee and employer max. Also you have options of going into startups.

Edit not to mention that tech can be malleable. Physicians are not see EM physicians. If you have to spend two-three years of training to do a "different field of medicine" then your field is not flexible at all. Also I need to say we don't get sick days. If you are sick you lose money and even now with Covid you are expected to work.
the people getting these tech jobs paying >300k are the cream of the cream of the crop. You're average CS graduate is languishing in 100k jobs making an app's button more responsive. I've seen the other side of tech and 95% of it is low quality, meaningless jobs. Or intense 24/7 positions being responsible for maintaining server up-time and then getting cut because your boss doesn't understand what you do.
 
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deleted941485

the people getting these tech jobs paying >300k are the cream of the cream of the crop. You're average CS graduate is languishing in 100k jobs making an app's button more responsive. I've seen the other side of tech and 95% of it is low quality, meaningless jobs. Or intense 24/7 positions being responsible for maintaining server up-time and then getting cut because your boss doesn't understand what you do.

This is what I always suspected about tech. The genius tech CS big dogs are the best but honestly most of the money in these orgs is on the management side. The dude hiring and firing May have been Ex CS or just have a bussiness degree they don’t know or care but they have all the power.

Like most big bussiness it’s kept going by armies and armies of cheap labor. In this case, it’s Eastern European and south East Asian programmers data scientists and CS engineers on work visas making 100K working remotely or living in HCOL areas while their bosses and overloads who haven’t programmed or designed anything in years if at all laugh all the way to the bank. They throw them a bone every once in a while but it sounds like a grind house
 
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EctopicFetus

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This is what I always suspected about tech. The genius tech CS big dogs are the best but honestly most of the money in these orgs is on the management side. The dude hiring and firing May have been Ex CS or just have a bussiness degree they don’t know or care but they have all the power.

Like most big bussiness it’s kept going by armies and armies of cheap labor. In this case, it’s Eastern European and south East Asian programmers data scientists and CS engineers on work visas making 100K working remotely or living in HCOL areas while their bosses and overloads who haven’t programmed or designed anything in years if at all laugh all the way to the bank. They throw them a bone every once in a while but it sounds like a grind house
It’s like law. The avg lawyer makes trash money. The cream of the crop are making millions.
 
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deleted941485

It’s like law. The avg lawyer makes trash money. The cream of the crop are making millions.

Well on our way! Only people that’ll be making any money will go to Harvard. Everyone else will spend there 30-50s in some crap practice making as much as a nurse.

Yup just like law
 
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xaelia

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I guarantee my friends at Apple and Google are working hard and feel quite stressed. No, they don't have to skip lunch, don't get punched by drunks at 3am, or chewed out by rabid Karenmoms. But, even at these golden places, only these last couple years did their salaries really start to approach physician salaries due to the massive uptick in stock prices and with RSUs.

I wouldn't go so far as to say "don't go to medical school", because there are some great jobs out there in *other* specialties. EM, unfortunately, looks to be the sort of thing where the only viable future career is part-time with some other side gigs.
 
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EctopicFetus

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The Em field is like a patient with a recent cancer diagnosis. The field is dying slowly but painfully. ACEP and Aaem (to a lesser degree) can try to save us but the cancer is growing (cmgs) and now we have mets in bad places (too many residency spots, mlp encroachment etc) these are like brain stem mets and mets to the spine.

We can see how it will end. I can’t lie as I’m ultra pessimistic about the field. Never felt so hopeless about em. My parachute is packed, I’ll just before we crash.
 
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nimbus

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Companies like Google do hire top candidates who demonstrate coding ability in on the spot technical interviews. But their compensation is comparable to medicine.


 

anonperson

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If you can swing a FAANG job and do well, you can make a killing with the stock options. Those are harder jobs to get though.

The main issues:

Ageism is a real thing. By the time you hit your late 40s, you're considered old. Getting a job in your late 40s and 50s is a tough thing.

Some of these companies are real meat grinders. Amazon has a reputation for being particularly bad. Why else would they increase their base pay recently?

Medicine isn't as great of a deal as it was in years past but it's not a bad gig.
 
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EctopicFetus

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If you can swing a FAANG job and do well, you can make a killing with the stock options. Those are harder jobs to get though.

The main issues:

Ageism is a real thing. By the time you hit your late 40s, you're considered old. Getting a job in your late 40s and 50s is a tough thing.

Some of these companies are real meat grinders. Amazon has a reputation for being particularly bad. Why else would they increase their base pay recently?

Medicine isn't as great of a deal as it was in years past but it's not a bad gig.
Medicine isn’t bad. It’s specialty specific. Plenty of ortho guys making $1m plus and minimal call or weekends and no holidays. Ophtho is sweet too. Primary care still isn’t ideal. Em was good but sinking quickly. Our job has always been hard but pay was reasonable. Now we are moving to where the job is harder and the pay is dropping. Yuck.
 
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deleted941485

Companies like Google do hire top candidates who demonstrate coding ability in on the spot technical interviews. But their compensation is comparable to medicine.



The salary might be the stock options probably bump those numbers up considerably. I suck at coding and have no intention of trying to learn that now.
 
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deleted941485

Medicine isn’t bad. It’s specialty specific. Plenty of ortho guys making $1m plus and minimal call or weekends and no holidays. Ophtho is sweet too. Primary care still isn’t ideal. Em was good but sinking quickly. Our job has always been hard but pay was reasonable. Now we are moving to where the job is harder and the pay is dropping. Yuck.

Most of medicine is going down the drain. Partly due to technology, govt regs, and the ****ing hoards of midlevels that graduate every year. Also No shortage of people willing to just work hard for years for absolute dick for the prospect of having a real career and making real money problem is when there’s too many people chasing the same damn dream nobody gets anything.
 
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mark v

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I did IT briefly before my journey in to medicine. You never feel safe, and for good reason. Job volatility was a big driver for my career change. After completing medical training, it's pretty easy to walk in to a quarter of a million dollar/year job with benefits as a joe shmoe. There are very few other fields that can make that claim.

In life and careers, you're either the hammer, or you're the nail. As medicine is further corporatized, we increasingly find ourselves as very highly compensated nails, for now.
 
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deleted941485

I did IT briefly before my journey in to medicine. You never feel safe, and for good reason. Job volatility was a big driver for my career change. After completing medical training, it's pretty easy to walk in to a quarter of a million dollar/year job with benefits as a joe shmoe. There are very few other fields that can make that claim.

In life and careers, you're either the hammer, or you're the nail. As medicine is further corporatized, we increasingly find ourselves as very highly compensated nails, for now.
Next stop is replacement with cheaper nails
 
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mark v

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Next stop is replacement with cheaper nails
Sad but true. The sky isn't falling, but it is getting a lot cloudier. I don't get those who refuse to see the writing on the wall.
 
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deleted941485

Sad but true. The sky isn't falling, but it is getting a lot cloudier. I don't get those who refuse to see the writing on the wall.
they're too far invested. debt, expectations to see the problems.
 

bronx43

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Most of medicine is going down the drain. Partly due to technology, govt regs, and the ****ing hoards of midlevels that graduate every year. Also No shortage of people willing to just work hard for years for absolute dick for the prospect of having a real career and making real money problem is when there’s too many people chasing the same damn dream nobody gets anything.
Great description of most of “academia.”

Everyone thinks they’ll be the guy seeing 25% clinical FTE and making 80th percentile salary. Chances are they’ll be the chump carrying the heavy clinical load for the whole department for 25th percentile salary.


…for their whole career.
 
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mark v

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So here's a something. With all the new online programs, how much longer will it be until we see a nursing surplus and where do things go then?
 

emergentmd

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Medicine is like a 2 inch putt where almost everyone will make it towards a good financial life. A few will make it big if they become an owner of a successful practice letting other 2 inch putters make money for them.

FANG jobs are like a 50 foot put where very few will make it but the rewards are great. Many will fail miserably but the exceptional have a greater upside compared to medicine.

Neither path is better than the other. Are you willing to gamble that your putting skills are exceptional? Even if you are exceptional, it doesn't mean you will make the 50ft putt.

Truthfully, if you gave 100 people the option of a 2 inch putt to guarantee 300K/yr vs a 50 foot put for $5M/yr, MOST would pick the 2 inch putt.

I have a brother that is a software engineering director at a large Tech company who would kill for my 2 inch putts. He works longer hours, had to travel precovid, and every time there is a layoff he has to worry. I doubt he made more $$$ throughout his career and definitely do not make more now than I do.
 
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