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URGENT! Is having a medical transcription degree valuable to Medical School Admissions?
I'm a freshman and I'm looking to make my profile more competitive. I know there are other ways to make it competitive like a phlebotomy degree etc. But I'm asking about Medical Transcription. Is it a plus to have worked as a medical transcriptionist for a year per say?
I would really appreciate your answers.
 

Promethean

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Eh. Medical transcription degree? Like an associates? Is that even a thing, or is this just a certificate program?

Is it going to make you more competitive? Probably only marginally, if at all. You will have medical terminology down pat, and maybe even understand some of the procedures. Anything like that, anything that demonstrates some degree of familiarity with the field is going to help a little. Will it help as much as something else? Maybe, maybe not. Depends on what other opportunities you are passing to do this.

What it might do is provide you with an income source while you are in school. Medical transcription can pay pretty well, certainly more than minimum wage, and it can be done from home once you have experience. That makes it a great part time gig for a student. If you are someone who needs to have an income, that can be a bonus.

Be sure that if you do it, you train through a legitimate community college or other real school. There are a lot of "medical" and health care trade schools that will charge you many thousands of dollars for courses you could have taken online or at a community college for a few hundred. They will make outrageous promises and talk you into taking enormous loans for an education that really isn't worth what you paid for it. Medical transcription is one that especially gets sold by these companies, because they know that the work at home aspect of it is very appealing.

In almost all instances, you'd be better off just focusing on your studies and aiming for the highest grades and test scores possible. If you want something that is going to boost your app, do some direct patient care. You can get a CNA for free by getting a job at a nursing home, or for cheap through a community college. Clinical experience is going look better than back office experience, pretty much always.
 
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Bones 2020

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Worry about your grades for now. Volunteer and shadow during the summers (and work if you have to, like I did)
 
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ananasmed

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Your degree is largely irrelevant in the scheme of medical admissions. Major in whatever interests you. That being said, I had a lot of experience working as a medical transcriptionist (without degree or certificate) and it came up in most of my interviews. It was good exposure to a different side of health care and I enjoyed doing it. However, I did also have hands on patient care experience so I can't say that the MT experience alone would have been sufficient. Basically, there's no one magical path to admission, so do what you like and try to enjoy the ride :)
 
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First of all, thank you so much for the quick reply. I appreciate it.
Yeah, its just a certification program. I was thinking of it as an income and to prove that I'm well-acquainted with medical and pharmacological terminology as well. I'm definitely doing an EMT, Phlebotomy, and/or CNA later. I'm a freshman, so do you think I could work as Medical Transcriptionist for a year, while still volunteering in a hospital, and manage to be competitive in my next 3 years with EMT or CNA?

Looking forward to hearing back from you.
 

kelminak

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Do you actually want to go through all of the certification and training to be an EMT or CNA, or are you freaking out and wanting to get as much clinical experience as possible. If the latter, why not do medical scribing instead? Additionally, if you're a college freshman, what brings you to the pre-osteo board?
 
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Do you actually want to go through all of the certification and training to be an EMT or CNA, or are you freaking out and wanting to get as much clinical experience as possible. If the latter, why not do medical scribing instead? Additionally, if you're a college freshman, what brings you to the pre-osteo board?
Thank you for your reply, I appreciate it.

Well, I'm certainly willing to go through the training to become an EMT or CNA. I know people who finished the training in 4-8 weeks. I will definitely look into Medical Scribes now that you mentioned it, sounds like a great idea. To answer your second question, I look forward to becoming an osteopathic doctor, so I figured I'd ask the community I'd like to part of in the future.
:):)
 
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Worry about your grades for now. Volunteer and shadow during the summers (and work if you have to, like I did)

I'm doing well so far, with an average accumulative GPA of around 3.8 . So I figured it's time I try to make my profile more competitive and earn some money. I really appreciate your advice, Thank you.
Are you a Pre-med too by any chance?
 
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Your degree is largely irrelevant in the scheme of medical admissions. Major in whatever interests you. That being said, I had a lot of experience working as a medical transcriptionist (without degree or certificate) and it came up in most of my interviews. It was good exposure to a different side of health care and I enjoyed doing it. However, I did also have hands on patient care experience so I can't say that the MT experience alone would have been sufficient. Basically, there's no one magical path to admission, so do what you like and try to enjoy the ride :)

Thank you so much, I really appreciate your response. It was very helpful.
 
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Don't be afraid to take a deep breath and enjoy life every now and then too. Your application is going to be in a big stack next to other applicants who also have good grades and hundreds of hours of clinical exposure.

What will differentiate your application from everyone else's application?​

You reach a point where you've proven that you want to be a physician (as far as volunteer hours and what not go). If you and another applicant have similar GPA and MCAT, but you have 700 hours volunteering/exposure and they have 400 hours volunteering/exposure but they are also more well rounded by having been involved in something other than just school and volunteering, I don't think having those extra volunteer hours will put you at any more of an advantage in the application process. Yes, clinical exposure is important, but they also want well rounded individuals -- join a club just for fun or something along those lines.

Don't lose focus on your studies, but also loosen your tie every now and then and enjoy life.

Again, what is going to make your application more memorable to adcoms who read thousands of applications from other people who also have good grades and clinical exposure?

Its a loooong road, but its all worth it once you get that first acceptance phone call! (Idk how I'll feel in a few months when I actually start and I'm in the middle of an exam week, but thats besides the point haha)

Best of luck!
 
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Don't be afraid to take a deep breath and enjoy life every now and then too. Your application is going to be in a big stack next to other applicants who also have good grades and hundreds of hours of clinical exposure.

What will differentiate your application from everyone else's application?​

You reach a point where you've proven that you want to be a physician (as far as volunteer hours and what not go). If you and another applicant have similar GPA and MCAT, but you have 700 hours volunteering/exposure and they have 400 hours volunteering/exposure but they are also more well rounded by having been involved in something other than just school and volunteering, I don't think having those extra volunteer hours will put you at any more of an advantage in the application process. Yes, clinical exposure is important, but they also want well rounded individuals -- join a club just for fun or something along those lines.

Don't lose focus on your studies, but also loosen your tie every now and then and enjoy life.

Again, what is going to make your application more memorable to adcoms who read thousands of applications from other people who also have good grades and clinical exposure?

Its a loooong road, but its all worth it once you get that first acceptance phone call! (Idk how I'll feel in a few months when I actually start and I'm in the middle of an exam week, but thats besides the point haha)

Best of luck!

Thank you so much for such an insightful reply. Very encouraging. It's true that many Premeds forget to do what they like. I'm going to be well-rounded in a sense since I'm changing my major to either Economics or Communications. I've only taken Prereqs and core courses so far so I can change majors without losing anything. And congrats on your acceptance!!! Best of luck!!
 
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AnatomyGrey12

Thank you for your reply, I appreciate it.

Well, I'm certainly willing to go through the training to become an EMT or CNA. I know people who finished the training in 4-8 weeks. I will definitely look into Medical Scribes now that you mentioned it, sounds like a great idea. To answer your second question, I look forward to becoming an osteopathic doctor, so I figured I'd ask the community I'd like to part of in the future.
:):)

Keep your GPA competative and just go MD. You can thank me later.
 
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NontradICUdoc

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Don't be so quick to take on "jobs" as a CNA or EMT. Since most of the applicants have something like this, it is no longer something that makes you stand out. You want to make yourself stand out and be competitive. Your focus should be on your grades, pure and simple. Without good grades, you can be an EMT, CNA, MBA, ABC, TTP, ITP, and have a whole alphabet soup after your name and it will be meaningless. Just look at Dr. Love from Miami, Fl (JK).

While you are getting good grades, you should do what you can to involve yourself in relevant extra curricular activities. Volunteer at places that is something other than a hospital is an idea. Why other than a hospital? Again you need to stand out from the crowd. If there are 20 people interviewing that week and you are the only one who volunteered making widgets that comfort rabbits going through hospice, believe you me, that is memorable (although this particular example would be memorable for a laugh).

Finally, when the time is right you need to focus on the MCAT. Once again, that alphabet soup after your name will be meaningless without a good score on the MCAT.

You are a freshman. Take your studies seriously and don't forget to also enjoy yourself. Try to think outside of the box for things that make you c0mpetitive regarding exposure. As a CNA, you will bascially be wiping dirty parts and changing sheets. No real exposure to medicine there.
 
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Don't be so quick to take on "jobs" as a CNA or EMT. Since most of the applicants have something like this, it is no longer something that makes you stand out. You want to make yourself stand out and be competitive. Your focus should be on your grades, pure and simple. Without good grades, you can be an EMT, CNA, MBA, ABC, TTP, ITP, and have a whole alphabet soup after your name and it will be meaningless. Just look at Dr. Love from Miami, Fl (JK).

While you are getting good grades, you should do what you can to involve yourself in relevant extra curricular activities. Volunteer at places that is something other than a hospital is an idea. Why other than a hospital? Again you need to stand out from the crowd. If there are 20 people interviewing that week and you are the only one who volunteered making widgets that comfort rabbits going through hospice, believe you me, that is memorable (although this particular example would be memorable for a laugh).

Finally, when the time is right you need to focus on the MCAT. Once again, that alphabet soup after your name will be meaningless without a good score on the MCAT.

You are a freshman. Take your studies seriously and don't forget to also enjoy yourself. Try to think outside of the box for things that make you c0mpetitive regarding exposure. As a CNA, you will bascially be wiping dirty parts and changing sheets. No real exposure to medicine there.

Thank you so much for your reply, I appreciate it very much. Yeah, what you're saying makes a lot of sense. I will never put a certificate above my GPA and MCAT studying. I'm already starting to study for the new MCAT. Thank you for your contribution Doctor, it was very helpful.
 
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AnatomyGrey12

Thank you so much for your reply, I appreciate it very much. Yeah, what you're saying makes a lot of sense. I will never put a certificate above my GPA and MCAT studying. I'm already starting to study for the new MCAT. Thank you for your contribution Doctor, it was very helpful.

There is no need to study for the MCAT this early, just do well in your classes and start studying 3-6 months prior to taking it. Studying now is a waste of time.
 
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Thank you so much for your reply, I appreciate it very much. Yeah, what you're saying makes a lot of sense. I will never put a certificate above my GPA and MCAT studying. I'm already starting to study for the new MCAT. Thank you for your contribution Doctor, it was very helpful.
Ok I'm saying this from a loving place in my heart. Stop. Being. So. Neurotic.
Studying for the MCAT now is going to do diddly squat for you. You're a freshman you don't even have the foundation of the coursework you need to be able to study that stuff.
Also going through the training to be an EMT or a CNA just to get into medical school is a colossal waste of time. If you need a source of income it's not a bad idea if it's something you enjoy but there is no sense in paying for that training for the marginal help it may give you. 4-8 weeks of training is more than you realize when you're in college.
Enjoy college. Volunteer. Possibly get a job doing something at the hospital.

Also change your pic if you want to remain anonymous on this website.
 
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Ok I'm saying this from a loving place in my heart. Stop. Being. So. Neurotic.
Studying for the MCAT now is going to do diddly squat for you. You're a freshman you don't even have the foundation of the coursework you need to be able to study that stuff.
Also going through the training to be an EMT or a CNA just to get into medical school is a colossal waste of time. If you need a source of income it's not a bad idea if it's something you enjoy but there is no sense in paying for that training for the marginal help it may give you. 4-8 weeks of training is more than you realize when you're in college.
Enjoy college. Volunteer. Possibly get a job doing something at the hospital.

Also change your pic if you want to remain anonymous on this website.

Lol, alright. Thanks for the advice, I will take it into consideration.
 
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