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ILoveIceCream

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My post says it all...I'm medical school in the US but am not a US resident...when I apply, does it mean that I will apply as an International? Please, any help will be greatly appreciated. I'm tearing my hairs out everyday trying to figure this out.:(
 

mmed

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My post says it all...I'm medical school in the US but am not a US resident...when I apply, does it mean that I will apply as an International? Please, any help will be greatly appreciated. I'm tearing my hairs out everyday trying to figure this out.:(

You will be an international student at US medical school with all consequences; visa, fees …etc. The point, after graduation and residency application you will be American Medical Graduate with visa issue, unless you will get green card or citizenship by then.
 
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ILoveIceCream

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No u have nothing to worry about it...even if you are canadian!

I guess I should be more specific; I apologize. what I meant was that when I apply for residency...would I apply as a Foreign Graduate or as a regular applicant? I am currently a first year at a US Medical School. I am not on any type of visa, just that my asylum status is pending and I have the right to stay here. Thank you for the words of confidence :)

mmed said:
You will be an international student at US medical school with all consequences; visa, fees …etc. The point, after graduation and residency application you will be American Medical Graduate with visa issue, unless you will get green card or citizenship by then.

I am sorry, I don't really understand what you mean by this...do you mean that when I graduate, I will apply as an AMG even if I am not a permanent US resident? If you can please specify, I would really appreciate it.:thumbup:
 

mmed

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I

I am sorry, I don't really understand what you mean by this...do you mean that when I graduate, I will apply as an AMG even if I am not a permanent US resident? If you can please specify, I would really appreciate it.:thumbup:

I mean when you graduate you will be considered as an AMG like anyone else. The programs when they look to the applications and select candidates for interviews then for ranking will consider everything including for example if you are an international person and you will be in need of visa. By the way, the same system applicable through ERAS and the Match for IMG and AMG, no difference. The perception of the programs is the different one. If you apply to a spot with someone else from your medical school and both of you have the same scores and every thing else equal, the program may rank the other before you just because of visa and complications of immigration process.
 

ILoveIceCream

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I mean when you graduate you will be considered as an AMG like anyone else. The programs when they look to the applications and select candidates for interviews then for ranking will consider everything including for example if you are an international person and you will be in need of visa. By the way, the same system applicable through ERAS and the Match for IMG and AMG, no difference. The perception of the programs is the different one. If you apply to a spot with someone else from your medical school and both of you have the same scores and every thing else equal, the program may rank the other before you just because of visa and complications of immigration process.

Since I essentially have a permanent work visa here in the US, do you think that will work greatly in my favor? That way, the Residency program doesn't have to deal with getting me a visa ( I can stay here indefinitely, or work permit (for I already have one)I would just need their residency spot :oops: . You seem really knowledgeable, what do you think?
 

mmed

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Since I essentially have a permanent work visa here in the US, do you think that will work greatly in my favor? That way, the Residency program doesn't have to deal with getting me a visa ( I can stay here indefinitely, or work permit (for I already have one)I would just need their residency spot :oops: . You seem really knowledgeable, what do you think?

As I said, suppose everything else is equal, they will rank the one without any work permit or any related issue before you. The PDs don't understand immigration issues and categories in details. But if you have more credits than others for sure they rank you first since you have indefinit work permit.
 

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A) In ERAS, you will look like a AMG, because that's exactly what you are: An American Medical Graduate, i.e. a graduate from an LCME-accredited school. AMG is based on where you were taught medicine, not the color of your passport.
B) If you have a permanent residency and work permit, there's no need for programs to be concerned about visa issues, so I see absolutely no reason to even bring that up.

There's a few creveats to the above. E.g., you cannot directly receive NIH research funding, unless you are a US citizen or green card holder. I -think- the same applies to a few Federal residency programs (like NCI etc.). And they'll spell out such special requirements. Other than that, you'll apply just like your classmates, and have no need to concern yourself with ECFMG, IMG/FMG status, and all that other nonsense.
 

mmed

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A) In ERAS, you will look like a AMG, because that's exactly what you are: An American Medical Graduate, i.e. a graduate from an LCME-accredited school. AMG is based on where you were taught medicine, not the color of your passport.
B) If you have a permanent residency and work permit, there's no need for programs to be concerned about visa issues, so I see absolutely no reason to even bring that up.

There's a few creveats to the above. E.g., you cannot directly receive NIH research funding, unless you are a US citizen or green card holder. I -think- the same applies to a few Federal residency programs (like NCI etc.). And they'll spell out such special requirements. Other than that, you'll apply just like your classmates, and have no need to concern yourself with ECFMG, IMG/FMG status, and all that other nonsense.

If you are AMG, FMG or whatever, in your application with ERAS and I think also with the match you have to answer a question if you are US citizen, green card, visa ...and this will show up to the program. Some programs can't sponsor visa or handle it (do not have international office). Others like military accept citizens as I beleive only and so on. Everything must be clear in the application
 

ILoveIceCream

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A) In ERAS, you will look like a AMG, because that's exactly what you are: An American Medical Graduate, i.e. a graduate from an LCME-accredited school. AMG is based on where you were taught medicine, not the color of your passport.
B) If you have a permanent residency and work permit, there's no need for programs to be concerned about visa issues, so I see absolutely no reason to even bring that up.

There's a few creveats to the above. E.g., you cannot directly receive NIH research funding, unless you are a US citizen or green card holder. I -think- the same applies to a few Federal residency programs (like NCI etc.). And they'll spell out such special requirements. Other than that, you'll apply just like your classmates, and have no need to concern yourself with ECFMG, IMG/FMG status, and all that other nonsense.


PAthone,

Thank you for taking the time to reply. In your statement, you said if I was a permanent resident. I do not have a permanent residency card, but I do have a court order that says that I am granted "withholding of deportation" indefinitely...essentially since I came to the US about 13 years ago. I hope that residency programs will understand my situation.
 

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I'm certainly no expert on immigration law, but more practically inclined: IF your current status allows you to work legally in the US without a visa, there's simply no need to bring visa issues up anytime during your application, interview or acceptance for residency. Hence, also on that score, you'll be treated just like any other AMG.
If citizenship issues comes up, you can just say that you have a permanent right of residency and work in the US, and if that's the case, I can't see anybody wanting to waste time on that issue.
 

ILoveIceCream

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I'm certainly no expert on immigration law, but more practically inclined: IF your current status allows you to work legally in the US without a visa, there's simply no need to bring visa issues up anytime during your application, interview or acceptance for residency. Hence, also on that score, you'll be treated just like any other AMG.
If citizenship issues comes up, you can just say that you have a permanent right of residency and work in the US, and if that's the case, I can't see anybody wanting to waste time on that issue.

Pathone,

Well said. Your words have given me confidence about my outlook once I finish medical school. I'm currently a first year and it was a long and torturous path to get here in the first place due to my strange residency status. I feel blessed everyday. :)
 

Scottish Chap

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Be careful with this one. What do you mean by "permanent work visa"? J-1? H-1?

Unless you have a green card (which you will need to have before citizenship in your case) or special diplomatic privilege, you definitely do not have "a permanent right of residency" in the U.S. and you will unequivocally have to prove this via formal documentation before a hospital lets you into their residency program. I have first-hand experience with this one. Hospitals are VERY concerned with fracturing immigration laws, and so they carefully follow what the BCIS stipulates.

I'm assuming you have the F-1 visa right now as a student. For your internship, the F1-OPT visa would buy you a year, but almost all residency directors sponsor residents on J-1 visas and, as you know, those have a 'home' requirement when they expire. I would try to apply for permanent residency (green card) right now so that it's pending while you're working hard in medical school. With a M.D. from an American medical school, you will be in great shape.
 

PathOne

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It seems to me that the OP is under some kind of refugee status, which is a special case that might in fact be equivalent to green card. But obviously, it'll be advisable to check up with an immigration lawyer, just to be on the safe side.
 

f_w

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If you apply for asylum, you have the right to stay and work in the US from the time that the goverment initially looks at your case until your case is decided. After the case is approved, you have another 10years or so that you have the right to be in the US and to work here before you become a permanent resident (there is a huge backlog of asylees waiting for asylum related green-cards).
 
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