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useful books

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by numinous, Nov 14, 2002.

  1. numinous

    numinous Member
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    I am applying to med schools now and will hopefully start next fall. In the meantime, I work for a bookstore and get a good discount on books and even some med equipment, stethoscopes, ophthalmoscopes etc. (I know there is some debate about whether some of the equipment is ever necessary to buy). I would appreciate some advice about what I should buy now. Are there a few excellent books that won't change appreciably in the next year or so? I don't want to invest too heavily and run the risk of losing a lot of $ if I don't get in, but are there any recommendations of things that I shouln't pass up?
    Thanks.
     
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  3. Castro Viejo

    Castro Viejo Papa Clot Buster
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    For the first-year I'd get the BRS Gross Anatomy book by Chung.

    For the second-year I'd pick up a copy of Baby Robbins (That's "Basic Pathology") and Microbiology made Ridiculously Simple.

    For third-year I'd get First Aid for Medicine Clerkship, Surgical Recall, and I guess First Aid for OB/GYN Clerkship.

    I doubt any of these will change in any real way over the next bunch of years.
     
  4. Dodge This

    Dodge This Senior Member
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    Personally, I wouldn't buy anything until I knew I was in somewhere. However, that's not what you asked...

    A good medical dictionary would be a wise investment now. Some other must-haves would be BRS Pathology and BRS Physiology.

    For equipment, the only major thing everyone has to have of their own is a stethescope. You'll probably want to wait anyway because unless your discount is upwards of 40-50%, chances are you'll get a deeper discount off retail for equpiment as a student.
     
  5. pillowhead

    pillowhead Senior Member
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    that's funny i came across this thread b/c I also work at a bookstore every summer and use my discount to buy books for the upcoming year! i actually have been accepted (Emory) and am 99% sure I'll go there in fall. so anymore recs?
     
  6. Castro Viejo

    Castro Viejo Papa Clot Buster
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    See, now I would've recommended a medical dictionary as well but you can get that by joining the AMA once you get to school. When I was a first-year we all joined AMA to get a copy of Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

    Joining AMSA gets you a copy of Netter's Atlas of Human Anatomy -- another must-have that you get for "free."

    For equipment: Get an average, run-of-the-mill stethoscope. Nothing too, too cheap but nothing like a Cardiology III (complete waste of cash). Don't bother with a diagnostic set (ophthalmoscope, otoscope) until you're sure you'll need it for a course. Don't bother with neurology stuff (reflex hammers, Queens Square hammer, tuning forks, etc.) until you need it, and then you can borrow it from someone more senior. :) What else? Uhm... Ooh... A copy of Maxwell's Quick Medical Reference.

    Congrats on snagging Emory.
     
  7. Weeble

    Weeble Senior Member
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    Lippincott's Biochem!
    supplements pretty much any biochem class well and you'll definitely need it for the boards.
     
  8. alina_s

    alina_s Senior Member
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    Rohen's Color Atlas of Anatomy- it's a photo atlas and I thought it was great to study with. Smells much better than the real thing and has a key to check your answers.
     
  9. IlianaSedai

    IlianaSedai Senior Member
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    Essentially, you just go to the bookstore, flip through the books, and choose the one you like best.

    If you have two or three years before you start med school, you really might want to wait, especially for topics such as biochem which does progress and get outdated. But basically for beginning med school there are three different types of books:

    1 - Textbooks
    2 - Study guides and/or review books
    3 - Atlases

    Different people buy different combinations of these. During your first quarter/semester, you do need an anatomical atlas for Anatomy and an atlas for Histology. As for textbooks and study guides, some people survive on textbook (and atlas for courses that require them), occasionally people survive on study guide only, and some people prefer to be generous with their book budget and get a textbook AND a study guide, or two textbooks, and sometimes two atlases for the same class. I have more than one of some things because I like to compare the two-- if one is unclear, I can refer to another to figure it out.

    When you ask the other med students, you'll get ten different recommendations accompanied by students swearing that theirs is *the* best. The reason why different people like different books is that they have different learning styles. Some books have poor verbal explanations but great visuals, and are well suited to people who ignore text and look at diagrams more. I tend to ignore diagrams and look at text more, so those people and I would have conflicting opinions about what is good and what is a crappy book. I also like books with good organization -- boldfaced words, useful headings, subdivided chapters, and so on. So after you get an idea of what the most frequently used books are, look at all of them yourself and choose one.
     
  10. IlianaSedai

    IlianaSedai Senior Member
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    Here is an incomplete list of some first-term books to look into.

    Anatomy atlases

    Grant's - illustrated and a classic, but Netter's is more clean and clear to me

    Netter's - illustrated, very clean and clearly depicted, the one most students use, occasionally hard to find things because it has too many labels!)

    Color Atlas of Anatomy by Rohen/Yokochi - photographs of some very good dissections. Much easier to find things in than the illustrated atlases, since many "extra" things labeled in the illustrated atlases actually cannot be seen in a real dissection.

    There are more atlases, both illustrated and photographic -- look into those too, but these were the ones that came off the top of my head and are the most frequently "prescribed." I actually bought two atlases (the last two I listed).


    Anatomy textbooks - Some authors wrote a huge mega-textbook, then spun off simplified versions and then reviews. Look into the whole range-- you might find yourself preferring to learn solely from the review book rather than the mega-book, etc.

    Richard Snell

    Keith Moore & Anne Agur

    I forget what else there is -- I didn't pay much attention to these.


    Histology atlases

    Jeffrey Kerr - Has good photos, but virtually no verbal explanations, so a good textbook and/or study guide is needed.

    Wheater - Has very good verbal explanations plus the essential photos, but occasionally I couldn't recognize slides from some of the photos.

    Again, there are others, so shop around.


    Histology textbooks

    Carlos Junqueira - Was originally written in Spanish, then translated. It is one of the most commonly assigned texts, but Spanish is a much more "rambly" language with lots of commas and long sentences! I did not like, but didn't see that much else out there. Some students, however, did like it.

    There are other ones, though-- shop around.


    Physiology textbooks

    Guyton & Hall - Thick full text.

    Berne & Leavy - Another thick full text.

    Linda Constanzo (Saunders Text and Review Series STAR) - Basic text, sufficient for the boards and has clear verbal explanations plus essential graphs.


    Other stuff

    Board Review Series (BRS) - You will see this in the medical textbook section. It is a series of study guides for various subjects throughout medical school. Pick one up if you like the outlines -- study guides can be very helpful, and occasionally students rely only on the study guide and no more. (I can't survive that way, but some do.)

    High Yield Series - More study guides. Cheaper, but also less in-depth-- in most cases, I would not rely solely on this to get by, but use it to supplement another textbook.

    An embryology text - Sometimes there is no formal embryo class, but embryo gets stuffed into the lectures and exams of all subjects, even though there really is no embryology explained in your basic anatomy or histology textbooks. I found myself relying heavily upon an embryo textbook (author Larsen - wordy but well organized and has good verbal explanations). You can survive with a study guide (see above) also. Need for an embryo textbook may vary by medical school, so wait until you find out where you're going first.

    I didn't find a medical dictionary to be that helpful. When I needed to look something up (rarely) I could find one lying around in the student lounge, the mailroom, the library, etc.
     
  11. Dodge This

    Dodge This Senior Member
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    I think AMA stopped giving out Stedman's. This year, the freebie was a Bates pocket physical exam handbook. AMSA still had the free Netter atlases, though. Best deal of them all.
     
  12. Castro Viejo

    Castro Viejo Papa Clot Buster
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    A pocket physical exam book? That should be a mark of confidence for your patients of your ability as a "doctor." :)
     

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