USMLE STEP I Failures

Discussion in 'Step I' started by kati, Feb 27, 2000.

  1. kati

    kati Junior Member

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    Ok, here's the deal. I took step I boards three times at my current medical school and failed by 2 points the first time, 4 points the second time, and 13 points the last time. I passed my first two years of medical school o.k. - was not at the top of the class, by a long shot, but I passed them. Basically, my school has told me, "We don't care where you go, but ya gots to get the hell out of here." Their major point is that at this point, even if I took USMLE step I over again and passed, I would be limited in the number of states I could practice in because of licensing requirements.
    The thing is, I still want to do medicine - BADLY - and not for any reason other than for me. I have no family pressure, am not interested in medicine just to make a lot of money and KNOW that I would be a really good doctor. My heart is still very much in medicine. I have wanted to be a doctor for as long as I can remember and can not think of any other career that I would want to do. The months of clincal rotations that I WAS able to do, I did very well at and am sure that with a better background and better performance in the first 2 years' curriculum, I would be able to do well during the clinical rotations. I have spent time overseas working in a hospital setting and really enjoyed it. I just can't see myself doing anything else. I know that if given another chance I would succeed at medical school.
    I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions. Do I have a chance to get into another medical school (allopathic or osteopathic) in the States? Is it even worth it if I do - financially and mentally? Does anyone know anyone who has been in a similar situation? What did they do? Is my plan for a medical career over? Does my history in medical school eliminate any future in U.S. Medical schools? Please say it 'aint so.

    Thanks alot for any info. anyone has.

    kati
     
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  3. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Exactly which school do you attend?

    Practically all US medical schools, allopathic or osteopathic, will not accept transfer applicants who fail out of other medical schools. And you can't apply as a "new student" because you're not and you can't hide that part.

    I know of one guy who was in that situation. He was an SGU student who failed the Step 1 a couple of times, and ended up not being able to pull a passing score. Technically his medical career is "on hold," but effectively, for the reasons your school mentioned, his medical career is over. He now drives a taxicab in New York City.

    Perhaps you can attend a foreign school and practice medicine outside the US.


    Tim of New York City.
     
  4. ana

    ana

    kati, what med school are you from? foreign or u.s.?

    why don't you post another message stating why it is you think you did not pass. what materials did you use for studying? how did you study? did you take a commercial preparation course? did you take any practice exams? what do you think is really the problem?

    you can only transfer to another school if you are a student in good standing, and you are not that right now. there is no second, other, chance. you will not be allowed to repeat your medical education as if your first two years never happend. you must proceed by taking the exam again, passing, and then biting the bullet with respect to licensing restrictions.

    i am sorry not to be able to be more encouraging, but it's time for you to hunker down, study, and not screw one more seating for the boards. your medical career (as a physician in the u.s.) is over if you cannot do this -- ugly, but realistic. yon't need to repeat two years of coursework that you have already successfully completed. just get some good study materials and put in the time.

    otherwise, if you are determined to stay in the u.s., you may have to begin considering become an allied health professional (such as a physician's assistant) and start looking at those programs.

    sorry -- i really hate to dash anyone's hopes. but it will really be more helpful for you to ask for advice about how to pass the boards than to seek advice for anything else at this point.
     
  5. reddy

    reddy Member

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    Kati

    why would you be limited in the number of states you can practice in? Do certain states limit the number of times you can attempt the USMLE steps and still get licensure?

    There was a post I remember reading maybe about a month or 2 ago. He/she didn't pass either. Maybe check the archives.

    If there is still hope and there are at least a few states you could practice in then I'd say keep trying. You were apparently so close! Good luck.

    Reddy
     
  6. kati

    kati Junior Member

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    Thanks so much turtleboard and ana for promptly replying and for being so honest.

    Let me try to answer as many questions as possible:
    I am currently attending a US medical school. I understand that I would not be able to transfer to another medical school (allopathic or osteopathic) because of my poor Step I history, which is why I was considering the option of "starting over" altogether as a new student - I mean retaking the MCAT, and everything.
    Of course, I realize that I would not be able to "hide" my history during a new application process and would not attempt to do that anyway. I am what I am, you know? Believe me, I wish medical school had been a lot easier for me, but I cannot change the past and I wouldn't even want to start over if it meant I had to lie or misrepresent myself in order to do it. I was just wondering what the chances are that a student in my situation would have in reapplying to medical school here in the States.
    The policy at the school that where I am is to dismiss students after three board failures, though the USMLE allows for up to six sittings for the exam. Though, I do have the option of formally petitioning the dean of my school and asking for permission to sit for the exam again, and will most likely do so just to keep my options open, I am wondering if, because I have an obviously shaky foundation and am now so far removed from my first and second year curriculum (it has been about 3 years since first year), it would be better to try to start anew and really get my basic science skills mastered. In a nutshell, what I fear most and am trying to avoid, is the scenario where I get approval from the dean to sit for the exam, take another 6 months to a year out to study and sit in some classes for review, just barely pass the exam and then scrape by my last two years because of a shaky foundation. Not to mention that I am already limited in where I can practice because of licensing issues, even if my last two years are stellar.
    Am I correct in thinking that if I were to start over (applying as a new student and explaining my history) at an osteopathic medical school that I would not run into licensing problems because they use the COMLEX instead of the USMLE for licensing pruposes? Or would my USMLE scores still affect licensing even in an osteopathic program?
    Okay, I know that that was a lot, but you guys were so helpful before, I hope you or anyone else who might have some suggestions will take a stab at my dilema once more.
    Thanks so much,

    kati
     
  7. kati

    kati Junior Member

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    Ana, I would like to try to specifically answer your questions about why I think I did not pass because I hope that someone else might be able to glean something out of this that they can use to avoid this in their own situation.
    I think there are many factors involved in the reasons why I have not passed this exam. And the saying, "hindsight is 20/20" was never more true than in my case.
    To summarize, I had a rough first two years, always struggling to maintain. I think part of that was because I didn't have a strong enough background. In hindsight, I think it is really important to have at least one class during your first year that you have mastered before you come to medical school - if only to build up your self-confidence. For example, during my first year, first quarter, we were required to take Gross Anatomy/Embryology, Biochemistry, and Histology, none of which I had not had any significant preparation in. It would have helped me tremendously if I had taken Biochemistry prior to coming to medical school. That would have given me at least one class that I could have "rested a little easier" in while getting used to the rigors of medical school.
    Before my first Step I attempt, I took the National Medical School Review commercial Step I preparation course. (I think it was 8 weeks long) My feelings on that particular review course is that if you would likely pass boards on your own, the course will help you do very well. If, however, a passing mark isn't so sure, it might be better to spend the time that you would be in lecture studying on your own or with a small group. I think I fell into the later category because of my rocky performance during my first two years.
    Between my first and second Board attempts, I sat in a Pathophysiology class and thought that I would do just fine reviewing the materials that I had already. I didn't have enough money to pay for another review course. I did very well in the Pathophysiology section of the test, but by then, my first year subjects had dropped.
    For this last time, I once again studied notes that I already had. I used the NMSR Board review series, but, I have to admit that I probably should have used them much more. Anybody out there who's listening. TESTS! TESTS! TESTS! Practice test yourself everywhere you go. On the toilet even. [​IMG] But really, I'm serious. I should have done that. Also, by the time I took the test this last time, I was trying to remember first year material that was not fresh. It had been about three years since my first year. That was a very difficult, particularly since I had no one to study with. I was "out of the loop" and really on my own.
    Also, ana, in all seriousness, even though I hate to have to admit it because it sounds weak and I generally hate excuses, I think psychologically taking this test the third time was a real trial. I am someone who has never had a problem in school - ever. I had a double major in college that I finished in four years. I am not a stranger to hard work so when my experience in medical school was so rough the whole way through,it really took it's toil and the failures at boards didn't help me.
    But that is one reason why I know I want to be a doctor because even after all of this, I still love it.

    kati
     
  8. UHS2002

    UHS2002 Senior Member

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    Kati,

    I sincerely doubt that you would stand a chance of being accepted into an osteopathic program after having being dismissed from an allopathic one.

    There is no reason for an osteopathic school to believe that you can pass the COMLEX after your track record with the USMLE (as a matter of fact, several of the people from my school I spoke to about last year's USMLE told me they scored better on the USMLE than on the COMLEX. One isn't necessarly more difficult than the other, but they are somewhat differently structured, so some people may find one easier over the other). I understand that you want to start over to "acquire the foundations" that you are lacking, however, you did pass your classes at your institution, correct?! Even if you passed with the bare minimum grades, that should have been enough for you to pass the USMLE (theoretically, of course), even if with the lowest grade possible. You could end up doing the same at an osteopathic institution and adcoms don't ususally like heavily stacked odds against an applicant from the get go.

    I am sorry you find yourself in this situation and that none of us have more optimistic words to offer you. As someone already stated, you may want to consider going to an offshore school and then practicing overseas. If your desire to practice medicine is so strong, that is probably the best avenue. Or, I also agree that you may want to look at an allied health care degree. I am not too confident that you would be accepted into a PA program, as they are very competitive these days. As a matter of fact, I know someone in a very similar situation as yours, and who was turned down by every PA program she applied to. Nursing, however, could be an option, and there are many programs where you can get your BSN and MSN/NP degrees in 3 years. These programs could also give you credit for many of the courses you have taken in med school.

    Good luck!
     
  9. kati

    kati Junior Member

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    reddy,

    In answer to your question:
    There are a few states who do limit the number of times you can take Step I and be eligible for licensure. Each states sets its own limits. Right now I am not exactly sure which states limit the attempts at passing to three, but I don't think there are that many.
    My concern comes because, when I spoke with my dean about the situation, he seemed to believe that the trend over the next few years would be one where more states would adopt this policy. He said that there was even some legislative action being discussed currently to make this limitation more of a nationwide policy He said that he could not be sure which states or how many states would likely be affected, but I would hate to do all of this and then only be able to practice in a few states.
    kati
     
  10. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Kati,

    The point is not only will other medical schools not accept you because of your history, but you cannot apply as a new student/matriculant. To do so would effectively wipe out everything you've done up to now in a medical school, and no one's gonna let that happen.

    I'm sure that this isn't the kind of answer you were hoping for, but the system of medical education we have in this country is designed to be pretty tight. I doubt that a medical school would even want to take the chance of taking on a student who won't pass because that makes the school look pretty bad. Med school curricula are designed to help students be doctors and to pass the Step 1. When a med student can't do that, it reflects very poorly on the curriculum and the school. Will the osteopathic schools want that burden? I doubt it, and it's a sure bet that the other allopathic schools won't want to deal with it either.

    If you still want to practice medicine, you can petition the dean of your school to let you have one more go. He may allow it just because he doesn't want anyone to fail out. If he won't allow it and you have to leave, then you may want to look into attending a foreign medical school where you will probably practice in that foreign country, or attempt to return to the US by taking the Step 1 yet again. If you have no desire to leave the US, then check out the other health professions: dentist, podiatrist, nurse practioner, PA, PT, or OT. And, if you believe in it, Chiropractic.


    Tim of New York City.
     
  11. ana

    ana

    Kati, One more question for you: are you a member of an underrepresented minority (American Indian, African American, Mexican Hispanic, native Puerto Rican)? Are you at a med school whose mission it is to graduate minorities? If so, then that fact may help you.

    The first thing you need to do is get permission to retake and then pass the exam.

    No, you will not be on shakey ground during your clinical years just because you did not repeat two years of classes -- DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REPEAT THESE CLASSES, IT WON'T HELP, AND NO ONE IN THE U.S. WILL ALLOW YOU TO. You will have more classes in your clinical years, and those classes are what will serve as the REAL knowledge base for your work with patients (the first two years was just a primer).

    This is what you need to do:
    Get a copy of 1st Aid for the Boards. If you can memorize that book cover to cover, my belief is you can pass the exam. You will need other supplemental materials, use the suggested books in the back of 1st Aid. To be frank the NMSL Boards series is much too tough. I consistently scored 30-50% on those exams, but I got a very good mark (well above average) on the Boards (you need a 60-66% to pass). I think it was a mistake for you to sit in on classes -- it takes too long and too much material in class is either too detailed or irrelevant for the boards. Also, when you review, you must review ALL the subjects, not just the parts you were weak on last time. You DO NOT NEED to take those classes again, Kati. You will NOT BE ALLOWED to take those classes again in an American school, Osteopathic or Allopathic.

    I think you are really psyching yourself out. Lots of people do not have those courses you mentioned coming into med school (in my school, Biochem is not even required as a prequisite). If you passed your classes, then you should be able to re-study for the boards. In fact, the people who tended to do well in those classes were those who had never taken them before (they studied more than those who had taken them before). This is why I am not really satisfied that I understand what the problem was for you -- your answer was vague and really just hinted at purely psycho-social factors. Were you stressed out? By what? What was/is going on in your life? What is stopping you now from planting your butt in the library for 5-6 hours per for about 4-6 weeks? You need to address these issues because you will want to discuss with your Dean why you had problems before, how you overcame them, and why the school does not need to worry about you academically again. Your dean is trying to protect the reputation of his school, and you have to be able to convince him that you've licked whatever problem you had with standardized exams in the past. You can bet on this issue to come up when you are applying for an appeal.

    [This message has been edited by ana (edited 02-27-2000).]
     
  12. Sheon

    Sheon Senior Member

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    This is going to sound shaky, but it is the best I could come up with (it's worth a try).

    1) Take the USMLE again. I think you said that they allow you up to six tries. Use all six, if you have to. Take the review courses (more than one simultaneously if you think it will help). I don't know if you can sit for the test with no school affiliation, but if you can, take it again. Keep taking it. Use every preparation method available to you (at this point I would think the prep course is a given).

    2) Once you have passed it, try seeking re-admission to the third year class at your school (if they have slots available they will probably consider you), any school with a LOW board passing rate and/or high attrition rate, and every foreign school you can think of.

    You will probably be afforded a whole lot more lattitude once you have showed that you can pass the USMLE. Trying to do anything with failed boards hanging over your head is unlikely to work.

    In order to reasonably expect someone to be willing to give you a chance, you have to show that you have overcome that USMLE hurdle.

    I find it very hard to believe that there isn't a single US Medical school or Foreign medical school that would be willing to pick up a student for an available slot in the third year IF that student has passed Step I.

    Lastly, don't get your hopes up too high. If this route is even possible (and I don't know that it is) it is going to be difficult and expensive. My guess is you already have somewhere between $30-60k debt.

    My guess is that dismissing students after three board failures has something to do with malpractice insurance. MAYBE they (they being ANYONE that is willing to give you a chance) will allow you to cover the cost of insuring yourself (which will probably be very expensive if it is even possible).

    I hope things work out for you.

    Sheon
     
  13. jscottc33

    jscottc33 Member

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  14. jscottc33

    jscottc33 Member

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    jsc
    Kati,

    could you please list your mcat score and gpa before you went to med school. also could you list your med school. i believe knowing your mcat score could help a lot of people that do not do well on standardized tests way the risks of pursuing med school. i made a 15,20,24, and a 23 on the mcat and have been accepted to an osteo school. i know there is a risk of not passing the boards.
     
  15. kati

    kati Junior Member

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    jscott,
    To tell you the truth, i can't remember my mcat scores. I know that sounds like a cop out, but i really can't remember them, it's been so long ago. They are in another state at my parent's house. Also, I understand that the MCAT is different now, and I am not sure if they are even scored the same now.

    But I do remember that my scores were pretty average. They were not great, by any means, but they weren't the worst either. I did do pretty well on the verbal section though, I do remember that.
    I graduated from college, summa cum laude with mainly A's and a few B's in my sciences courses except Organic Chemistry, in which I received a C+. I majored in Biology and a Fine Art in College and completed both degrees in 4 years.
    Hope this helps, jscott.

    kati
     
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  17. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Just a technical point: the MCAT hasn't changed since 1991.

    Tim of New York City.
     
  18. exile

    exile New Member

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    Kati,

    I don't think you should worry about anything but trying to pass Step 1. I have a friend that took four times to pass Step 1, and two times to pass Step 2, and he still got interviews, including one at UPenn. The best part of that is that he went to a foreign medical school. So I guess some introspection is probably necessary to see if you can muster the energy to give it another shot. I think that since you came this far, it would be a shame not to. The most important thing to remember is that you are not alone in your situation, literally thousands of well qualified people don't pass step 1 on multiple tries, so that shouldn't discourage you. The fact that you got into medical school to begin with shows that you have what it takes to do the work. You might just have to change a couple of things that you did on prior attempts to overcome this adversity. The fact that your score declined after the first time you took it might mean that you have to analyze the source texts you used to study.

    Sit down with your score distribution from your Step 1 results. Approximate your strong points and weak points. If you are very weak in a particular area, go to the gold standard text and force yourself to do a detailed review; maybe even a first learning. Sometimes notes are not enough if you don't have a clear idea of the central topic. For example, if Pathology was a weak point for you, go back and read Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease, and then read Dr. Goljan's notes from the NMSR course. I am sure if you do that you will be able to strengthen your knowledge base.

    I hope this helps.


    e
     
  19. kati

    kati Junior Member

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    Once again, I just want to thank everyone who has taken the time to give their opinion. You have all been really honest and in the situation that I am in right now, that is really what I need.
    I have really been thinking hard about my situation this week, re-evaltuating my options, my dreams, and doing alot of self-introspection. I have talked to all of the State medical boards and there seems to be only about 5 states that have any limits at all on Board attempts and those aren't that rigid. The only one that I think I probably wouldn't have a chance at is Montana and I doubt I'd end up there anyway.
    Exile, I can't tell you how much your message has given me hope. I was hoping that I could talk to at least one person who had been in my situation and "made it" and the fact that you have a friend who seems to be doing well is encouraging. By the way, what area of medicine did your friend pursue?
    My plan right now is to petition my dean and see if he will let me sit again for the Board and take the Kaplan/NMSR/Compass 13-week review course in June. This is supposed to be a really rigorous review. And ana, yes, I am going to "hunker down" and get my butt in the library and study my ass off. [​IMG] I just hope the dean allows me another chance.
    Thanks you guys. Feel free to add any other comments as you see fit. I will definitely keep checking back.

    kati
     
  20. crahgs

    crahgs New Member

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    Kati,
    I don't think your situation is hopeless. If I could, I'd like to give you some optimism.

    1. I am an ms3 at an allo school. A 4th year at my school previously attended a different allo school, failed step 1 3 times, and then subsequently reapplied to my school (as a new applicant, no this is not illegal or out of the question as most of you seem to think), was accepted, repeated years 1 & 2 and then passed step 1 on her 1st (well, actually 4th) attempt.
    2. I have two suggestions, I?m not sure which one is better, let?s face it, you?re in a tough situation:
    a. Appeal with all your might to your own school. Convince them that you are committed to becoming an excellent physician. Convince them that your previous failures are only a small set back in your promising future. And convince them that in attempt number 4 you will pass step 1. Of course you should also pass step 2 on your first attempt.
    b. If your school just won?t allow you to take step 1 again?I say ?allow? because I think you need a medical school?s certification of approval on your USMLE application to be even allowed to take the test?call the student affairs dean at every allo and osteo school in the nation and tell them of your commitment, your small obstacle to certain future success, and ask them if they will consider you for a spot as a new applicant (again, this is not illegal).
    3. If you do get another chance to take step 1, let me give you a few tips. My advice to mastering the material is different from most of my classmates (and most of all medical students). My style worked for me (score=249). It will appear at first that my style would take way too long to attempt but I am almost certain that my style took less time than it would have taken me to read the Kaplan series of books (I took the boards 3?5 weeks earlier than all of my classmates). Here is my advice:
    a. You are not studying to pass step one, you are studying important information that will help you become an excellent doctor. If what you are studying seems like obscure tidbits of information, the type of info that won?t help you with clinical medicine, you?re studying the wrong information. The USMLE writes excellent tests. They test you on relevant info. Remember, you?re studying to practice good medicine, not to pass a test.
    b. Assess your weaknesses before you begin. You probably already know your weaknesses but to actually assess them use the Kaplan starter kit book. It has two tests. Take the first test and submit your answers on their web site. They?ll send you back an assessment of your strengths and weaknesses. This Kaplan book is very representative of the actual step 1 test. No other book of sample tests comes close.
    c. Make your weaknesses your strengths.

    d. Begin early. Because you are studying to become a doctor, you?re studying to solidify this info into your mind for the rest of your career. Cramming is a big mistake. I began about Christmas time in my second year. If you start early, you?ll have the luxury to be able to work slow and meticulous, solidifying the core principles of medicine into your head. Most of my classmates started too late and then they hit the inevitably panicked. When you hit the panic stage, you can?t concentrate, you cram, you waste your time.

    e. Learning the basic sciences is like building a pyramid. The most important and first step to studying for step 1 is building a strong foundation. Thus before you even think of opening that Kaplan book or that BRS book, you should master the two most critical basic science subjects--physiology and biochemistry. Thankfully because of a couple of excellent texts, this task is fun and not all that difficult. First, read Guyton physiology from beginning to end. If your physiology is weak, don?t try to skimp with the mini edition (though for those of you who have a decent foundation in physiology, the mini edition will suffice?it?s the one I used). You should go to the library today and check out the hefty text (or better yet, buy it?if I could only buy one basic science book, it would be guyton.) After you have mastered guyton, it?s time for the second core book?Lippincott?s biochem. I?m sure you own this one already. You?ve read it before. But you didn?t master it. Read it again and this time, master it.

    f. If you?ve mastered guyton and Lippincott, it?s time to move on to the second layer of the pyramid. The first layer was the foundation, but you?re structure is still at ground level. It is time to add height to your structure. It?s time to read the two books that will bridge your newly acquired mastery of the science of medicine with what we?re all here to learn--clinical medicine. These two books can and should be read in synchrony. The more important of the two books is by Stobo, The Principles and Practice of Medicine. The other book you already own, Robbins, Pathologic Basis of Disease. Read these books cover to cover. I recommend reading an organ system section of Stobo and then the same organ system section of Robbins. Or you could read one from beginning to end and then the other from front to back. Once again, master the material. A third book can supplement these two books, but should be only used as a supplement. This book is Lippincott?s pharmacology. Thus when you read the hypertension section in Stobo, you may want to quick review Lippincott?s anti-hypertension medications. This should not take long however because by having read guyton you have already solidified your knowledge of the sympathetic nervous system. Also, Stobo offers a more than adequate pharm review (this is one of the many beauties of Stobo).
    g. If you master these four books (or five) you will easily pass step 1. In fact, you?ll almost surely score above the 50th percentile. But for those who want to do even better, I have a couple more tidbits of advice. Read Levinson?s medical microbiology and immunology pages 1-71 and 314-380. Read first aid for the boards but only as a supplement. It should not be your core text. Remember, you?re learning to be a doctor; you?re not studying to pass a test! Read Guyton again. Read Stobo again. Flip through the pictures and charts in Robbins again--If you see a bolded disease and you can?t remember the details of the disease, quick refresh your mind. Read high yield behavioral sciences. Master this book. Master sensitivity and specificity. Master blood smears. Master genetics. Yes, genetics?Stobo has a short but excellent section on genetics. Know this section. Robbins has some genetics too, not as good as Stobo but good nonetheless (are you starting to get the drift as to why I say these two books are so important?). If time still permits, quick review anatomy and embryology. But if you don?t know Stobo, you?d be making a mistake to even think about opening Netter instead of Stobo. Stobo, Stobo, Stobo, it?s the most underutilized text in the first two years of medicine (and years 3 and 4 for that matter).

    Good luck, I admire your commitment. Don?t give up, some day you?ll make an excellent doctor.
     
  21. exile

    exile New Member

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    kati,

    the program my friend was granted an interview was for a new program in rehabilitation medicine that was recently started there.

    Don't worry, if you're willing to do the work, there will be schools willing to train you further.

    e
     
  22. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor

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    Crahgs,

    You mean to tell me your school took in someone who essentially failed out of another med school as a "new" first-year? Did you friend tell your med school he failed out, or simply applied as a "new" applicant?


    Tim of New York City.
     
  23. DO Boy

    DO Boy Senior Member

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    crahgs,

    if i had to vote on the best, most helpful posts on this board, it would be your crahgs. very organized and informative.

    thanks (even tho it wasn't originally for me),
    DO Boy
     
  24. md03

    md03 Senior Member

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    Also check out the web site "Success Types Survivial Strategy"

    (Sorry, I don't have the URL handy, but if you put that into your search engine you should find it)

    This has been developed by a couple of professors at Texas Tech, and discusses study strategy. It is one of the most helpful things I have encountered. The kind of thinking that this method teaches you is also the kind of thinking needed to solve clincial problems...just what you will do as a physician, and the kind of thinking required for USMLE.

     
  25. reddy

    reddy Member

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  26. Paul's Boutique

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    Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never--in nothing, great or small, large or petty--never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense.
    - Sir Winston Churchill

    [​IMG]

    [This message has been edited by Paul's Boutique (edited 03-12-2000).]
     
  27. medstud

    medstud Junior Member

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    Who among us would say that medschool doesn't have the potential to eat you alive. I know we all face this everyday. Part of the process is putting students in a pressure cooker, with dozens of responsibilities besides studying.
    If I found myself in the same situation I would find a faculty member who would take me into their lab. Next, I would make a contract with the Dean to do a year of research. During that time do nothing but study. It solves most of your problems; It takes all the other pressures off, it buys you time, and the research experience will help to offset poor performance on the boards. This is the strategy sometimes used with struggling students and gives you a better shot than trying to enroll in another school as a tarnished student.
    PS - the boards average a 7% failure rate, and the average student performance has marched from 200 to 215 since 95.
     
  28. Just a reply to keep this current since I knocked it off with all the med school posts.

    ------------------
    Jim Henderson, MD at http://www.studentdoctor.net
     
  29. felicia2001uk

    felicia2001uk Junior Member

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  30. Summer.Thunder

    Summer.Thunder Junior Member

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    "kati" wrote that in 2000! my god, u wrote a reply 6 years later? so I did a little search. it seems that she started doing rotations in 2002. somehow she was able to pass step 1 and moved on.
     
    nebuchadnezzarII likes this.

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